07a Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)

07a Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)
Virginia Lawyers
Image by Kansas Sebastian
Palm Springs Historic Landmark No. 34
__________

The Willows Historic Inn, 1924
Dow and Richards
412 W Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs

While looking for a Heineman on Tahquiz Canyon Way, which appears to have been demolished, I turned around to find this lovely Mediterranean Revival Villa. Once the Winter home of New York Lawyer Samuel Untermyer, it is now a charming and lovely inn. Although it’s described as Mediterranean, I initially saw it as Spanish. It just goes to show that style is in the eye of the beholder.

– Kansas Sebastian
__________

Samuel Untermyer (March 6, 1858 – March 16, 1940), also known as Samuel Untermeyer [1] was a Jewish-American lawyer and civic leader as well as a self-made millionaire. He was born in Lynchburg, Virginia but after the death of his father the family moved to New York where he studied law. After admission to the bar, he soon gained fame as a lawyer, focusing on corporate law, and became recognized as a civic leader, frequently attending the Democratic National Convention as a delegate.

Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Untermyer

Personal Injury – Do I Need a Lawyer? Fairfax, VA

www.gross.com When do you need a lawyer to handle your personal injury case from an automobile accident? Why not keep all the money and save the attorney’s fee? In this video Edward Gross of Gross & Romanick, PC, a Fairfax Virginia law firm, discusses when to hire a lawyer and when to do it yourself. The video gives practical advice on handling your own claim. It also explains lawyer’s fees and what sevices an experienced law firm can provide that a lay person probably cannot do. If you’re in the Washington DC area and need a lawyer consider Gross & Romanick, PC. http
Video Rating: 0 / 5

07b Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)

07b Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)
Virginia Lawyers
Image by Kansas Sebastian
Palm Springs Historic Landmark No. 34
__________

The Willows Historic Inn, 1924
Dow and Richards
412 W Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs

While looking for a Heineman on Tahquiz Canyon Way, which appears to have been demolished, I turned around to find this lovely Mediterranean Revival Villa. Once the Winter home of New York Lawyer Samuel Untermyer, it is now a charming and lovely inn. Although it’s described as Mediterranean, I initially saw it as Spanish. It just goes to show that style is in the eye of the beholder.

– Kansas Sebastian
__________

Samuel Untermyer (March 6, 1858 – March 16, 1940), also known as Samuel Untermeyer [1] was a Jewish-American lawyer and civic leader as well as a self-made millionaire. He was born in Lynchburg, Virginia but after the death of his father the family moved to New York where he studied law. After admission to the bar, he soon gained fame as a lawyer, focusing on corporate law, and became recognized as a civic leader, frequently attending the Democratic National Convention as a delegate.

Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Untermyer

07e Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)

07e Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)
Virginia Lawyers
Image by Kansas Sebastian
Palm Springs Historic Landmark No. 34
__________

The Willows Historic Inn, 1924
Dow and Richards
412 W Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs

While looking for a Heineman on Tahquiz Canyon Way, which appears to have been demolished, I turned around to find this lovely Mediterranean Revival Villa. Once the Winter home of New York Lawyer Samuel Untermyer, it is now a charming and lovely inn. Although it’s described as Mediterranean, I initially saw it as Spanish. It just goes to show that style is in the eye of the beholder.

– Kansas Sebastian
__________

Samuel Untermyer (March 6, 1858 – March 16, 1940), also known as Samuel Untermeyer [1] was a Jewish-American lawyer and civic leader as well as a self-made millionaire. He was born in Lynchburg, Virginia but after the death of his father the family moved to New York where he studied law. After admission to the bar, he soon gained fame as a lawyer, focusing on corporate law, and became recognized as a civic leader, frequently attending the Democratic National Convention as a delegate.

Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Untermyer

The Big Picture, episode 4, Interview with Judge Thomas D. Horne and Rhonda Paice, Esq.

Jon Huddleston interviews Judge Thomas D. Horne and Rhonda Paice of Loudoun County to discuss their community service, particularly their involvement in Loudoun Bar Association’s “Leadership in the Law Summer Camp” held in Leesburg, Virginia. Senior Justice Harry L. Carrico and local lawyers participate. www.loudounbar.org www.fauquierbar.com www.camphighroad.org
Video Rating: 4 / 5

“Irrepressible Conflict or Blundering Generation? The Coming of the Civil War” Exhibit

“Irrepressible Conflict or Blundering Generation? The Coming of the Civil War” Exhibit
Virginia Lawyers
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here are images from the exhibit "Irrepressible Conflict or Blundering Generation? The Coming of the Civil War," on display in the Marshall Gallery (first floor rotunda) and the Special Collections Research Center Lobby in Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. The exhibit will be on display from April -September 2011.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

Blundering Generation, 1830s-1850:

The Blundering Generation school believes that the Civil War resulted from a series of mistakes by politicians, whose failure to act as statesmen allowed extremists on each side to push the nation into war. J.G. Randall coined the phrase “blundering generation,” which was the title of his 1940 presidential address to the Mississippi Valley Historical Association. Other historians who led this school included Charles Ramsdell and Avery Craven. It was especially popular during the 1950s, at the height of the Cold War, when people did not want to believe that two radically different civilizations (such as the United States and the Soviet Union) would inevitably end up at war with each other.

Rise of Abolitionism:

The 1830s saw the rise of radical abolitionism. Although many people had opposed slavery earlier, the focus had been on ending it gradually. The radical abolitionists demanded an immediate end to slavery. In 1835-1836, they sent thousands of petitions to Congress calling for a ban on slavery in Washington, D.C. Southerners persuaded Congress to adopt the “gag rule” to leave abolitionist petitions unread. In the diary included here, an unidentified Vermonter records the speech of Senator Felix Grundy, a Jacksonian Democrat from Tennessee, opposing the abolitionists. The abolitionists also flooded the South with “incendiary publications” sent through the mail. Southern whites reacted by trying to ban the use of the mails for that purpose. Many Northerners joined Southern whites in viewing the abolitionists as dangerous fanatics, and a Northern mob even killed an abolitionist publisher.

The Oregon Question and the Mexican War:

Some historians believe President James Polk blundered in the mid-1840s by treating expansion into free territory in the Northwest differently than expansion into slave territory in the Southwest. Despite rhetoric suggesting he would go to war to win more land for Oregon, Polk reached a peaceful settlement with Britain, accepting a much smaller territory than Northern expansionists desired. But when it came to Texas, Polk seemed to go out of his way to provoke a fight, and the U.S. ended up at war with Mexico.

Southerners, including the Shockoe Hill Democratic Association, supported the annexation of Texas, and far more Southerners than Northerners volunteered for military service. Included here is a muster roll for a Virginia company, as well as an equipment list for a Mexican battalion that seemed to have more musical instruments than weapons. The U.S. commander, Winfield Scott (W&M 1804/1805), led an invasion that succeeded in capturing Mexico’s capital. In the documents shown here, he tried to make his troops treat civilians respectfully and reassured the Mexican people that the U.S. had issues with their leaders, not with the people.

The United States gained a huge amount of territory in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848. Northern antislavery politicians tried to impose the Wilmot Proviso, declaring all of the lands acquired in the War to be free territory, but outraged Southerners were able to block its passage in the Senate.

California and the Compromise of 1850:

The discovery of gold in California in 1848 set off a gold rush, drawing thousands of people such as Philip Hines, whose diary and Bible are included on the top shelf. With a booming population and a desperate need for government, California applied for admission as a free state, setting off a crisis. Adding another free state with no slave state to balance it would give the North control of the Senate, alarming Southern whites, especially in view of the Wilmot Proviso. More extreme Southerners talked of secession.

Henry Clay of Kentucky, nicknamed the Great Compromiser, proposed a series of measures to settle all the disputes between North and South. For more than thirty years, Clay (who had trained to be a lawyer under William and Mary law professor St. George Tucker), antislavery Daniel Webster of Massachusetts, and pro-slavery John Calhoun of South Carolina had dominated Congress. This crisis would be the last hurrah for all three, who gave the last great speeches of their careers on this issue (a colleague read the dying Calhoun’s speech for him). Clay and Webster pled with both sides to support compromise and save the Union. Calhoun defiantly insisted that the North needed to back down and refused to compromise. Despite Calhoun, the Compromise of 1850 passed.

As the letters included here show, many Americans hailed Clay and the compromisers for saving the country. Northern extremists denounced the Compromise as a pact with the devil due to the Fugitive Slave Act. Southern extremists argued that the South got precious little out of it except the Fugitive Slave Act and that by conceding a majority in the Senate to the North, it sealed the South’s fate.

Fugitive Slaves:

The Fugitive Slave Act further inflamed tensions between North and South. Northerners were appalled as slave-catchers claimed runaway slaves, some of whom had lived in freedom for years. Northern states passed laws to hinder the enforcement of the Act, infuriating Southerners. Adding fuel to the fire was Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, published in 1852. A huge bestseller, it portrayed the cruelties of slavery and the efforts of slaves to escape to freedom, winning many fans in the North and many enemies in the South. Swem’s collections include a letter from Quashy, a runaway slave, to William Seward, the Northern abolitionist, in 1850. Quashy told Seward he intended to live in a house Seward owned in Albany, New York.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Can anyone recommend a divorce lawyer near Alexandria, Virginia?

Question by Heather H: Can anyone recommend a divorce lawyer near Alexandria, Virginia?
I’m looking to find a good lawyer that practices in or around the Alexandria/Springfield area. I’m hoping this divorce isn’t particularly complicated, but knowing my soon-to-be-ex, you never know. I’m also hoping to find someone that isn’t going to cost me a fortune.

Anyone have any tips or suggestions?

Best answer:

Answer by Queen of Weddings
I would suggest Nicholas Balland in Arlington Va, also if you want it to be done, quick, I would try legal aid of Fairfax County.

Add your own answer in the comments!

Virginia Divorce│Omitted Property in Separation Agreement by Virginia Divorce Lawyer

www.virginiadivorceattorney.com Omitted Property. What happens in an agreement when you fail to mention property that’s been omitted in the agreement. Normally, if you fail to discuss it then it’s probably going to the person who has title or ownership to the property. One of the clauses you might want to put in your Separation Agreement is an Omitted Property Clause. This clause will spell out what is going to happen to any property that was omitted purposely or by accident.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Luther Cone

Luther Cone
Virginia Lawyers
Image by jajacks62
Co. C, 186th OH. Infantry
The Chanute Daily Tribune, June 14, 1916

MR. LUTHER
CONE DEAD
______
FUNERAL SERVICES IN HOME
TOMORROW AFTERNOON.
________
FUNERAL SERVICES IN HOME
TOMORROW AFTERNOON.
______
HE HAD LIVED IN
CHANUTE SINCE 1870
_________
HIS PARENTS SETTLED IN KAN-
SAS IN 1856.
______
He Was In Lawrence When Quantrell’s
Raiders Made Their Massacre
and Played An Active
Part In the Development of
Chanute.
______
Luther Cone, Sr., died this morning at 8 o’clock at his home, 915 South Central avenue, after an illness dating from an attack of la grippe in January. He was in his seventy-fifth year. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 4 o’clock at his late home, the Rev. Mueller, rector of Grace Episcopal church, conducting the services.
Mr. Cone was educated for a minister. The accident of war made him a soldier, and the fortunes of civil life turned him to the law and later to editorial work. His life’s activities miight fairly be epitomized to three epochs–soldier, lawyer, editor.
Came Here in 1870.
He came to Chanute as a settler in 1870, though he had passed through this locality several times in ’68 on trips from Lawrence and Leavenworth to the Indian Territory trading posts. For the first twenty of his residence here he was actively and prominently associated with all the town’s affairs. He studied law, was admitted to the Neosho county bar, and practiced continuously for twenty years. He was successfully, and for several terms each, justice of the peace, police judge, city attorney and city clerk. He helped organize the Methodist church Sunday school, the Odd Fellows and Knights of Pythias lodges, the first fair association, and, with R. N. Allen, and S. A. Wickard, organized Neosho post of the Grand Army of the Republic and was its first commander.
Editorial Writer.
In the early days he played tuba in the band, bass viol in the orchestra, bass drum in the drum corps, was usually a speaker of campfires, reunions and political gatherings, became editor of the Chanute Weekly Chronicle for eighteen months that the town might not lose its paper, and generally showed that versatility and adaptability which was the characteristic of the pioneers of Kansas.
Later he was associated with his son an editorial writer on the Chanute Daily Sun for thirteen years, and following that served as deputy oil inspector for four years.
Suffered From War Diet.
At intervals he suffered greatly from stomach trouble, the origin of which he attributed to a 3-day diet on apples and apple cores during the war. For the last ten years he had prolonged his life by a number of hours’ work daily in the garden, which, with his library, he greatly enjoyed. He was of rather a retiring disposition in later life, but his friendships were many and stood the test of time. His patient, genial nature was a lasting pleasure to his friends.
The Family.
He was married in Chanute May 4, 1874, to Mary Bertha Giles, daughter of Pearce Giles, Esq., who had brought his family to Chanute from England the year previous. He is survived by his wife and four children, Fred P. and Gladys of this city, Luther G., with the Santa Fe at Kansas City, and Curtis E, with the Prairie Oil & Gas Company at Independence. Of his brothers and sisters there remain Mrs. J. C. Mann of Orlando, Fla., John P. Cone of Lawrence, Kas., and Mrs. Mattie Sleeth of Portland, Ore., all old residents of Chanute. His mother and his eldest brother are buried in Elmwood.
Of Pioneer Stock.
Luther Cone came from a family of pioneers and patriots, whose each succeeding generation answered the call to arms if one was made. He was the son of Luther and Margaret Obershiner Cone, one of fourteen children, all born in Delaware county, Ohio, and a direct descendent of Daniel Cone, who settled the town of Haddam, Conn., on a king’s grand in 1642.
His parents were pioneers of Ohio, moving from Chambersburg, Pa., at an early age. In Ohio they acquired woolen mills and large farming interests, all of which was sold to move to Kansas in 1856. The outbreak of the war found them settled at Lawrence, and the father and five sons joined Kansas regiments for the front.
Luther was returned to Delaware College to study for the ministry, where he remained long enough to join the 148th Ohio when it was enrolled. He was invalided home in time to go through the Quantrell raid, surviving the horrors of that day through quick wit of neighvor women. After the war he served an apprenticeship under Abe Marks, a pioneer jeweler at Lawrence, who died a few weeks ago.
A Colonial Ancestor.
In the family history book is preserved a document which typifies the stock from which Luther Cone sprang. It is a petition addressed to the colonial congress by an ancestor, Nathaniel Cone of Virginia. The phrascology is quaintly colonial, but in substance it says:
"I gave my nine sons to my country ungudgingly; none returned. My revenues were taken by the government in burdensome taxes, and my properties have been destroyed by the ravages of war. At 91 years of age I have neither chick nor child nor worldly substance. Will this government show its ingratitude by furnishing me a poor house to die in, rather than a pension to live on?"
And so it was with all of them, from the first of his name–they went to war at the first call, and cut out their lives to fit afterward.
Brother’s Appreciation.
A few lines written this morning by his brother John P. Cone, beautifully express an appreciation of him:
He loved the worthy, the gems of earth,
The flowers and things that charm. He abode in patience, through flood and death,
And did no creature harm.
He saw this grand old universe
Her wondrous charms reveal;
He meekly bore the age old curse,
To him, his God was real.
His voice never vexed the market
place
With clamor vain and loud;
He strove with fortitude to face
All linings of the cloud.
The love of wife and child was won
With naught of cruelest strife,
With much of labor, more of fun,
Indeed, what more is life?

James M. Allen

James M. Allen
Virginia Lawyers
Image by jajacks62
Co. K, 16th IND. Infantry
The Chanute Daily Tribune, Monday, Dec. 2, 1912
Died: Dec. 1, 1912
Buried in East Hill Cemetery, Erie, Neosho County, KS.

JAMES M.
ALLEN DEAD
_____
INJURIES BY FALL FROM BUGGY
PROVED FATAL.
______
HE HAD LIVED IN
COUNTY 47 YEARS
______
GAVE UP COLLEGE TO FIGHT
FOR THE UNION.
______
He Saw Four Years’ Service in the
Civil War, Being Held a Prisoner
in Texas Nearly Six Months—
In Chanute Thirteen
Years.
______

James M. Allen, for more than forty-seven years a resident of Neosho county, died at his home, 401 South Lincoln avenue, at 11 o’clock last night. His death was the direct result of injuries which he received when he fell from a buggy Thursday of last week—Thanksgiving day.
He alighted upon his head, the blow producing concussion of the brain and a fracture of the spine. These injuries, in connection with his health, which had not been robust for three or four years, soon terminated fatally.
At the time of the accident Mr. Allen was returning from an inspection of the rock road being constructed south of the city. The horse behind which he was riding became frightened. It kicked and backed and was starting to run when Mr. Allen jumped from the buggy.
A telegram is expected from the son, Clay Allen, in Seattle, Wash., and if he cannot come the funeral will be tomorrow. A short service will be held at the home and the body will be taken on the afternoon train to Erie for interment. The Santa Fe railroad has expressed its willingness to hold the train returning from Erie, in case there should be any delay in the funeral, so that all will be able to return to Chanute that evening.
Mr. Allen was born January 31, 1842, in Putnam county, near Greencastle, Ind. In September, 1860, he entered Asbury university, now De Pauw university, which institution he attended until the following April, when he, together with a number of other students of the university, enlisted in Company K, Sixteenth Indiana volunteer infantry, for one year. He was mustered out at Washington, D. C., in June 1862.
His regiment was reorganized an he re-enlisted and was mustered in as a sergeant, August 16, 1862. He was commissioned second lieutenant in July, 1863.
While taking passage down the Red river on the river boat “City Belle,” he was taken prisoner, May 1, 1864, by the Confederate forces at Snaggy Point, and was, by them, taken to Tyler, Tex. October 20 of the same year, under the name of Andrew H. Patrick, a fellow prisoner who had previously escaped, he was exchanged and returned to his regiment, where he was commissioned first lieutenant in May and served until the end of the war, July 1865. He was discharged with his regiment at Indianapolis.
September 27, 1865, he moved to Kansas and settled on a claim in what is now Neosho county. August 27, 1867, he married Eva Foster at Baldwin, Kas. Thereafter they continued to make their home on the farm until November, 1883, when they moved to Erie, Kas., together with his nephew, Will T. Allen, organized the private banking firm under the name of Allen & Allen. In this business he continued for sixteen years, at the expiration of which time he disposed of his interest in the bank and with his family moved to Chanute, where he had made his home ever since.
He is survived by his wife, Eva Foster Allen and four children, I. Foster Allen of Chanute, Miss Ada Allen of Chanute, Mrs. T. L. Rosebush of Tecumseh, Okla., and Clay Allen of Seattle, Wash. Another son Harry the first born, died in infancy, at the age of 4 years.
His three surviving brothers are A. P. Allen of Erie, H. C. Allen, who many years ago made his home in this city, but now resides in Indianapolis, Ind. And R. N. Allen of this city.
He had held a number of positions of public trust, and was a member, at the time of his death, of the Tioga township road commission, road improvement being a matter in which he was much interested.
He was a member of the state legislature in 1873, defeating C. F. Hutchings, now of Kansas City, Kas. While in the body he gave warm support to the bill, which is now law, making taxes payable semi-annually instead of only once a year, as formerly.
In 1867 he was a member of the board of county commissioners, and was re-elected in 1871, being chairman of the board his second term.
He was appointed chief of police by Mayor D. M. Kennedy in 1903, serving a year or more.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Southeastern Kansas, pg 243 & 244

Chicago: Biographical Publishing Co.

1894.

J. M. ALLEN is the senior member of the firm of Allen & Allen, bankers of Erie, and is a worthy representative of the business interests of this place. A native of Indiana, he was born in Putnam County, January 31, 1842, and is a son of R. N. and Elizabeth (Talbott) Allen. The father was born in Virginia, and about 1827 emigrated to Putnam County, Ind., where he entered land from the Government. He made the trip in company with William Talbott, the father of his intended wife. There he opened up a farm, transforming the wild land into rich and fertile fields. Devoting his energies to its cultivation until 1865, he then removed to Bloomington, Ind., where he died on the 12th of October, 1876. His wife passed away in 1860. While in Indiana he served as Associate Judge of Putnam County. He held membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church. The maternal great-great-grandfather of our subject was one of the heroes of the Revolution.
J. M. Allen belongs to a family of eleven children, eight of whom grew to mature years, while four sons and two daughters are yet living, all of who graduated at De Pauw University. The sons are: A. P., residing in this county; R. N., who is President of the First National Bank of Chanute, Kan.; H. C., a prominent lawyer of Indianapolis, Ind., who is now serving as attorney for the street railroad company and an insurance company; and our subject.
Mr. Allen whose name heads this record attended the public schools of Putnam County, Ind., and then spent one year in De Pauw University, where we find him at the breaking out of the war, in April, 1861. He immediately left the schoolroom, and when Lincoln issued the first call for troops he joined Company K, Sixteenth Indiana Infantry. He became First Lieutenant, and was mustered out July 20, 1865. At Snaggy Point, on the Red River, he was taken prisoner May 1, 1864, and was incarcerated for five months and twenty days at Tyler, Tex. He was wounded at the battle of Arkansas Post, and again at Vicksburg. He participated in the entire siege of that city, and was also in many other hotly contested engagements.
After the war, Mr. Allen removed to this county and entered from the Government one hundred and sixty acres of land in Erie Township. He afterward purchased eighty acres and began the development of his farm, the boundaries of which he extended from time to time until he had seven hundred acres. This he sold in 1883. He was married in Baldwin, Kan., August 27, 1867, to Miss Eva, daughter of Henry Foster, of Putnam County, Ind. They began their domestic life upon the farm where they lived until 1883, when they came to Erie.
Mr. Allen is numbered among the pioneers of Neosho County, which was very sparsely settled by white people at the time of his arrival, and Indians still lived in the neighborhood. He has seen as many as twenty-two deer from his cabin door at one time. On coming to Erie in 1883, he formed a partnership with his nephew, W. T. Allen, in the banking business, in which he has since continued. It has become one of the leading financial institutions of the county, business being conducted on a safe and conservative basis. He has led a busy and useful life, yet has found time to serve in public office. In 1867 he was elected County Commissioner for a two-years term, then was re-elected, and served as Chairman of the Board during the time of the trouble concerning the county seat. In the fall of 1873 he was elected to the State Legislature upon the Republican ticket, being a stanch advocate of Republican principles until 1877, at which time he espoused what was known as the Greenback cause. In 1878 he was a candidate for State Senator, but was defeated by one hundred and forty-four votes. Socially, he is a member of Erie Post No. 311, G. A. R., which he joined at its organization, and in 1892 was elected as a delegate to the National Encampment in Washington. He belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and Modern Woodmen, and holds membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Allen were born four children, two sons and two daughters: J. F., who is serving as book-keeper in the bank in Erie; Clay, who has just been appointed a cadet at West Point; Sue and Ada, who are at home. The family is widely and favorably known in the county, its members holding an enviable position in social circles. Mr. Allen has borne all the experiences of frontier life in this locality, and is familiar with the history of its troublous times. On the side of right and order he has ever been found, and his hearty support and co-operation have ever been given to those enterprises tending to advance the best interests of the community.