Obituary of J. B. F. Cates
Virginia Lawyers
Image by jajacks62
Probably Company E, 4th Tennessee Cavalry, C. S. A..
Below information from Kevin Ivey, Sons of Confederate Veterans, Kansas.
I have two obits (below) on Joseph B. F. Cates, but neither tell the unit he
served in. There is a Jospeh B. Cate in Co. E 4th TN Cavalry (Branner’s),
which became Co I, 2nd TN Cavalry I suspect strongly as being him, as it
was formed up in Jefferson County, which matches the location from the
obits, and the age matches, service records show 24 in 1864.
J. B. F. Cates is indeed in Mt. Hope in Independence, but he is in the
mausoleum there.
Kevin

South Kansas Tribune
Wednesday, August 25, 1926
Front Page Column 1

JUDGE J. B. F. CATES DIED LAST FRIDAY MORNING
Was Kansas Pioneer; Chief Counsel for Prairie Interest for Many Years

Judge J. B. F. Cates, aged 89, a pioneer Kansas attorney, and
from 1900 to 1917 chief legal counsel for the Prairie Oil & Gas Company,
died at his home here at 418 North 12th street shortly after 2 o’clock last
Friday morning. His death followed an illness which had lasted since
November 11, 1925.
Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 3 o’clock from
the local Episcopal church, with Rev. T. G. Hill, rector of the Chanute
Episcopal church, in charge. Interment was made in the mausoleum at Mount
Hope cemetery, where services were held by the Elk’s Lodge, of which Judge
Cates had long been a member. The body lay in state at the Episcopal parish
house from 11:30 until 2:30 Monday. The Prairie offices closed at 2:30 for
the remainder of the day in tribute to the memory of Judge Cates.
Judge Cates had enjoyed fairly good health, and had been very
active, until last November, when he fell over a cable stretched along West
Myrtle street, where paving operations were in progress. The fall fractured
his hip, and since that time, he was confined to his home, under the care of
a nurse. Despite the fact that he was closely confined to his home, he
manifested his usual interest in public affairs.
At 2 o’clock last Friday morning he complained to his daughter,
Miss Ada Cates, who was reading to him, that he could not see through his
glasses, and death followed in but a short time.
The deceased is survived by his daughter, Miss Ada Cates, of the
home address, and two sons, Charles H. Cates of New York City, and R. W.
Cates, of the Citizens-First National bank here. Judge Cates’ wife died in
January 1925.
Judge Cates was born in Grainger county, Tennessee, April 19,
1840, a descendant of a fine old English family which had settled in
American in the colonial period. He spent his boyhood in his native state,
where he obtained a common school education. In 1860 he graduated from
Newman college, in Jefferson county, Tennessee. He served in the
Confederate army until 1864, then he was taken prisoner.
He was soon paroled, however, and went to Platte City, Missouri,
where he began to read law. He was admitted to the bar in 1867. Mr. Cates
was untied in marriage to Miss Nellie Wilhoite, of Platte county, Mo. Three
of the five children born to this union survive. For a short time he
established himself at Leavenworth, and the came to Humboldt, where he
remained for ten years as a pioneer Kansas lawyer. In 1877 he left Kansas
to open up an office in Kansas City, Mo. In 1884 he went to Florida, where
he spent three years, and then returned to this state, this time locating in
Fredonia. In 1893 he left Fredonia for Chanute, and practiced there until
1905, when he came to Independence.
From 1900 until 1917 he was chief counsel for the Prairie Oil &
Gas Company. He was one of Kansas’ oldest practicing lawyers, and was
recognized as one of the most efficient. Early in his career, Judge Cates
was attorney for Guffey & Galey, the forerunners of the Prairie system.
Judge Cates was a member of the Knights Templar here, as well as
of the Ancient Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Mirza Temple, at
Pittsburg. He was also a member of the local Elks lodge.

Independence Daily Reporter
Friday, August 20, 1926,
Front Page Column 3

JUDGE J. B. F. CATES DIED EARLY TODAY; A KANSAS PIONEER
Long Chief Counsel of Prairie Oil & Gas Co. Here
NATIVE OF TENNESSEE
Judge Cates Lived in Humbolt in Early Days – Death Came at the Age of 89

Judge J. B. F. Cates, aged 89 years, retired attorney for the
Prairie Oil & Gas Co., died early this morning at the family home, 418 North
Twelfth street, following an illness since November 11, 1925.
Funeral services will be in charge of the Prairie companies, who
will furnish the pall bearers and make other necessary arrangements which
will be announced in detail either Saturday or Monday. Judge Cates had
requested that his body be taken to the Potts Funeral home to lie until
services could be held from the Episcopal church, and then taken to the
mausoleum, where the Elks should have charge.
Arrangements are held up pending arrival of one son, Charles H.
Cates of New York City, who is now on a trip in New Hampshire.
Injury Proved Serious.
Judge Cates was very active during his life time until he fell
over a wire cable stretched along the paving on West Myrtle street, where
paving operations were going on. His hip was broken, and since that time he
has been confined to is home under the care of a special nurse. Despite his
advanced years and the seriousness of his condition he manifested a close
interest in the affairs of the city.
His daughter, Miss Ada, was reading to him at 2 o’clock this
morning when he complained that he could not see through his glasses and
death followed shortly after.
The deceased is survived by one daughter, Miss Ada of the home;
and two sons, Charles H. Cates, New York City; and R. W. Cates of the
Citizens National Bank here. Mrs. Cates passed away in January 1925.
Born in Tennessee.
Joseph B. F. Cates was born in Grainger county, Tennessee, April
19, 1840, the son of Charles and Elizabeth (Lloyd) Cates. His father was a
native of North Carolina, and was reared and educated in his native state,
being the descendant of fine English ancestors, who settled in the Carolinas
during the colonial period.
Mr. Cates was the youngest of a family of three sons and three
daughters. His boyhood was spent in Tennessee, where he attended the common
schools and worked on the farm during vacations. He afterwards took a
collegiate course at Newman college, Jefferson county, Tennessee, where he
graduated in 1860. Immediately after aiding in surveying public lands in
Nebraska, he began to read law in Platte City, Mo., where he was admitted to
the bar in 1867. For a short time he located at Leavenworth. Soon after he
located at Humboldt for the active practice of his profession, bec oming a
pioneer lawyer of Kansas. He was a partner of L. W. Keplinger, now of
Kansas City, Kans., for a time.
For ten years Mr. Cates remained in Humboldt, where he built up
a good practice, but left Kansas in 1877 to open an office in Kansas City,
Mo., where he remained until 1884. From that city he went to Florida for
three years returning to Kansas and opening an office at Fredonia. From
1887 until 1893 he remained in that city, moving from there to Chanute where
he lived until 1905, when he moved to Independence.
Joined Prairie in 1900.
From 1900 until 1917 he devoted his entire time and services to
the Prairie Oil & Gas company of Independence as chief attorney for the
corporation. He was one of the oldest practicing lawyers in Kansas and had
a wide range of experience in professional work. He was admired and
respected by the men of his profession and highly esteemed by many friends
and acquaintance as a broad, liberal, and generous man.
Fraternally he was a Mason, being Knight Templar here and a
member of the Ancient Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Mirza Temple at
Pittsburg. He was also a member of the Elks lodge.
Served in Civil War.
Mr. Cates served in the Confederate army during the Civil war
until 1864, when he was captured and paroled, following which he returned to
Missouri, where he began the study of law.
Mr. Cates was united in marriage in 1869 to Nettie Wilhoite, of
Platte county, Missouri. Five children were born to the marriage of whom
three survive.
In his early career Mr. Cates was a attorney for Guffey & Galey,
pioneer oil men who afterwards sold out to the Forest Oil Company which was
afterwards reorganized as the Prairie Oil & Gas company and the offices
moved to Independence. E. T. Patterson has been with the company since the
days of the early organization of the company along with Mr. Cates.

__________________________
Joseph B. F. Cates, lawyer, was born in Grainger county, Tennessee, April
19, 1840, the son of Charles and Elizabeth (Lloyd) Cates. His father was a
native of North Carolina, and was reared and educated in his native state,
being the descendant of fine English ancestors, who settled in the Carolinas
during the colonial period. He became a farmer and then emigrated from North
Carolina to Tennessee, where he became a pioneer settler west of the
Alleghany mountains. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth
Lloyd, also was born in North Carolina, but of Welsh ancestry.
Mr. Cates is the youngest of a family of three sons and three daughters, all
of whom grew to manhood and womanhood, but he is the only one who survives.
His boyhood was spent in Tennessee, where he attended the common schools and
worked on the farm during vacations. He afterward took a collegiate course
at Newman College, Jefferson county, Tennessee, where he graduated in 1860.
Immediately after receiving his degree of A. B. Mr. Cates came West, and
after aiding in surveying public lands in Nebraska, began to read law in
Platte City, Mo. He was admitted to the bar in 1867, at Platte City, and
soon afterward located at Humboldt, Kan., for the active practice of his
profession, becoming a pioneer lawyer of Kansas. For ten years Mr. Cates
remained in Humboldt, where be built up a good practice, but left Kansas, in
1877; to open an office in Kansas City, Mo., where he remained until 1892,
with the exception of four years spent in Florida; then he returned to the
Sunflower State and located at Chanute, where he resided until 1907, since
which year he has resided in Independence. Since 1900 he has devoted his
entire time and services to the Prairie Oil & Gas Company, of Independence,
as attorney for the corporation. He is one of the oldest practicing lawyers
in Kansas, and has had a wide range of experience in professional work. He
is admired and respected by the men of his profession, and is highly
esteemed by many friends and acquaintances, as a broad, liberal and generous
man. Fraternally, he is a Mason, being a Knight Templar and a member of the
Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Mirza Temple, Pittsburg,
Kan. He has never sought political honors, preferring to devote his whole
time and attention to professional work.
Mr. Cates was married in 1869, to Nettie, the daughter of John H. Wilhoite,
of Platte county, Missouri. Five children were born to the marriage: Charles
Henry, who was educated at the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va.,
and who is now a traveling salesman for a New York City house; Lloyd R.,
engaged in farming in Oklahoma; Philip F., a graduate of the Kansas City,
Mo., Dental College, who is now practicing dentistry in Oklahoma; Roscoe W.,
a graduate of the law department of the University of Kansas, now assistant
cashier of the First National Bank of Independence; and Ada F., a graduate
of the University of Kansas, class of 1906, who later spent two years at
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.
Pages 261-262 from volume III, part 1 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state
history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities,
towns, prominent persons, etc. … / with a supplementary volume devoted to
selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago :
1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank
W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is
identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is
a two-part volume 3.