Do you agree with ICE using any means to locate and capture illegal aliens?

Question by : Do you agree with ICE using any means to locate and capture illegal aliens?
Police and other agencies use sting operations and undercover alias’ all the time. Why should ICE not be allowed to use any means possible to round up these illegals who are breaking the law?

Immigration agents suspected of posing as LDS missionaries

By Kristen Moulton

The Salt Lake Tribune
Updated: 12/28/2009 05:26:57 PM MST

The American Civil Liberties Union is raising the suspicion that federal immigration agents posed as Mormon missionaries to try to nab undocumented immigrants.

The allegation was made by a California professor writing in a recent edition of The Nation magazine who quoted Marina Lowe, an ACLU staff attorney in Salt Lake City.

The article, posted online Dec. 17, asserted that ICE agents throughout the nation use all kinds of ruses, including posing as missionaries and insurance agents.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokeswoman Virginia Tice on Monday said the allegation that agents pretend to be missionaries is “patently untrue.”

Lowe told The Salt Lake Tribune that she had little to go on when a woman living along the Wasatch Front reported last spring that ICE agents may have posed as LDS missionaries.

The woman, who was suspicious of other visitors seeking her husband around the same time, said two people dressed like missionaries but lacking black name badges commonly worn by Mormon emissaries, came to her door, Lowe said.

“It was purely her impression,” Lowe said. “She was very suspicious.”

The day after she confirmed for the visitors that her husband lived there, the article said, he was arrested by ICE agents.

Visitors seeking her husband previously about an insurance matter, however, left a phone number.

Lowe said that when she telephoned the number, the man who answered ultimately acknowledged he was an ICE agent.

“He said they use whatever tactics they can to get someone to talk to them,” Lowe said.

The ACLU attorney said she was not able to probe the woman’s suspicion about visitors dressed like missionaries because they left no contact information.

The report echoed similar anecdotes from the immigrant community in Utah County, she said. “It’s hard to get to the bottom of [these stories]. People are very worried about coming forth with their story.”

But Tice said the two top ICE officials in Utah deny their agents ever pose as missionaries.

“The thing that’s troubling about this is it is causing significant anxiety in the Mormon community, which is appropriate,” Tice said. “But it’s patently and completely false.”

LDS Church spokeswoman Kim Farah declined comment. “The church cannot comment on unsubstantiated allegations,” she wrote Monday in an e-mail.

Aaron Tarin, an immigration attorney in West Jordan and a Mormon, was quoted in The Nation story.

“If this gets out,” Tarin told the magazine, “it could have a catastrophic effect on missionaries’ work in Utah, and it can really put missionaries in danger. Aliens could get hostile and offensive.”

Tarin did not return a phone call Monday seeking comment.

The article by Jacqueline Stevens, a University of California at Santa Barbara professor in the law and society program, detailed instances in which ICE agents allegedly impersonated OSHA inspectors, insurance agents and religious workers.

“The effect,” she wrote, “is to corrode trust in the government, neighbors — and even Mormons.”

Contacted by The Tribune , Stevens was dubious of ICE’s denials. “How do we know it’s not part of their ruse operation to lie about ruse operations?”

When Stevens was preparing her article, she asked ICE whether it is consistent with government policy for its agents to pose as religious workers. The e-mailed answer did not deny such ruses, but instead said tactics are effective to enhance officer safety.

“They told me it’s consistent with their policy,” Stevens said. “Why would I doubt it?”

http://www.sltrib.com/faith/ci_14082628
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Best answer:

Answer by Anti Censorship
Yes, its good they are finally doing something about the illegal alien problem. 12 million is no small number you know, hell Switzerland only has a population of 3 million! We have 4x the number of illegals than Switzerland has people in it!

What do you think? Answer below!

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in Austin, TX

Check out these Network advertising images:

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in Austin, TX
Network advertising
Image by Rainforest Action Network
Thanks to the activists in Austin, TX who posted these spoof Chevron posters!

When Chevron rolled out a fancy new ad campaign, we were ready for them. We had only a fraction of Chevron’s budget — the company won’t say how much it spent this time around, but typically spends as much as million on an ad campaign like this — but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage. Go here for the full scoop.

That’s interesting
Network advertising
Image by kevindooley
Last night I read Flickr’s patent on its interestingness algorithm. Patents are not easy to decipher sometimes, especially if they’re written well as this one is, but I think I have some interesting things to share…

(Note: Please don’t confuse the following with a discussion about Explore. Explore depends on interestingness, but getting into Explore depends on a lot more than just interestingness.)

From reading the patent, it seems to me that the entire "Flickr System" is largely built around this notion of interestingness, so anyone who says that popularity and interestingness are not important in Flickr universe is dead wrong. My intuition is that Flickr was designed first as a means to provide superior search results to seekers of "media objects", and second as a social network. It’s interesting to see that the patent description forsees video and other objects, as well as launched advertising specific to the content of the media object (i.e. image).

The basics of the "interestingness score" that Flickr calculates for each of your images have been discussed here and many places: how many faves, comments, notes, views, and where the views come from (e.g. an award group versus an outside search engine). Also discussed elsewhere is the "how many groups" question (answer: 1-5 good, +5 perhaps penalized).

Here are some tidbits from the patent that perhaps are less intuitive…
–Interestingness is affected by how long it’s been since your last upload (it doesn’t say how it takes any of these factors into account by the way!)
–The EXIF camera data is important to have. If you are uploading scanned images (e.g. film) it likely won’t have such data. My recent lomos didn’t get into Explore until I added the EXIF data (I use a Mac, so I used some freeware called "Reveal 1.2").
–Other metadata is important to have. I haven’t done "controlled experiments" on this, but my guess if the title, description, tags, or sets are empty, that decreases interestingness.
–Interestingness is decremented over time (e.g. 2% a day); and is decremented in the presence of metadata (in the title, text, tags, comments, notes) of blacklisted words (you can guess what those are!)

I also found it interesting that an image’s interestingness score can be customized to the requester of the score. For example, if you’ve faved a lot of my pics with a particular tag, then other pics that you haven’t faved but which have the same tag will show up to you as "more interesting".

Of course, in the end, faves and views and comments and all that stuff is the outcome–the cause is having an interesting photo to start with!

(Explore)

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in New York, NY

A few nice Network advertising images I found:

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in New York, NY
Network advertising
Image by Rainforest Action Network
Chevron rolled out a fancy new ad campaign yesterday, and we were ready for them. We had only a fraction of Chevron’s budget — the company won’t say how much it spent this time around, but typically spends as much as million on an ad campaign like this — but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage. Go here for the full scoop.

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in New York, NY
Network advertising
Image by Rainforest Action Network
Chevron rolled out a fancy new ad campaign yesterday, and we were ready for them. We had only a fraction of Chevron’s budget — the company won’t say how much it spent this time around, but typically spends as much as million on an ad campaign like this — but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage. Go here for the full scoop.