How was the First Battle of Bull Run during the Civil War historically significant?

Question by Molly: How was the First Battle of Bull Run during the Civil War historically significant?
I’m just doing a project and I’m a little stuck.

Best answer:

Answer by Jack P
The first Battle of Bull Run was historically significant because it established in the minds of the observers who trekked out from Washington in their Sunday best to watch it that the war probably wasn’t going to be as short as they previously believed.

The Battle of Bull Run was fought between the Confederates and Non-Confederates and was generally appraised as a victory for the Confederates by experts on both sides.

What do you think? Answer below!

Battle of Antietam; 17 September, 1862; Kurtz and Allison Art Publishing Company, Chicago; 1888

Battle of Antietam; 17 September, 1862; Kurtz and Allison Art Publishing Company, Chicago; 1888
Virginia Union University
Image by Penn State Special Collections Library
The full ferocity of the Battle of Antietam is captured in this beautiful memorial print produced by the Kurtz and Allison Art Publishing Company to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the bloodiest single-day battle in American history. The first major battle of the American Civil War to take place on Northern soil (near Sharpsburg, Maryland) produced a staggering 23,000 casualties. The epic battle pitted Union General George McClellan’s Army of the Potomac against Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Tactically the battle was inconclusive, with the Union halting Lee’s advance into Maryland but failing to pursue the Confederates southward to deliver a fatal blow. Only five days after this pyrrhic victory, September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln announced that he would issue a formal emancipation of all slaves in any state of the Confederate States of America that did not return to Union control by January 1, 1863.

American Battlefield Prints Collection, Rare Books and Manuscripts Collection, Special Collections Library, University Libraries, Pennsylvania State University

Penn State’s Special Collections Library

Legacy of Civil War era celebrated by University Libraries’ exhibit

Battle of Carnifex 150th Anniversary

On September 10, 1861, Union and Confederate troops fought atop Carnifex Ferry in a battle pivotal to the withdrawal of rebel forces from what is now West Virginia. This weekend, the Carnifex Ferry Battlefield State Park, in Nicholas County, commemorates the 150th anniversary of the conflict. Clark Davis has this report, centered on the annual reenactment in 2009.

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Battle of the Bulge Memorial

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Battle of the Bulge Memorial
Virginia Western
Image by wallyg
The Battle of the Bulge Memorial, a gift from the grateful people of the United Kingdom of Belgium and Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, was dedicated on December 16, 1986. Known to the public as the Battle of the Bulge, the Ardennes Offensive, or Ardennes-Alsace campaign, officially called the Unternehmen Wacht am Rhein (Operation The Guard on the Rhine) by the German Wehrmacht, was a major German offensive through the forested Ardennes Mountains region of Belgium, France and Luxembourg on the Western front. The Germans had Lasting from December 16, 1944 to January 25, 1945, the Germans were turned away as survivors retreated to the defenses of the Siegried Line. With over 800,000 men committed and over 19,000 killed, the Battle of the Bulge became the single biggest and bloodiest battle that American forces experienced in World War II.

Arlington National Cemetery, a military cemetery directly across the Potomac from Washington, D.c., was established during the Civil War on the grounds of the Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. By 1864, the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria were filled with Union dead. After Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs quickly selected Arlington as a replacement, in part to prevent the Lee’s from ever returning, the government confiscated the land claiming unpaid property taxes. Today, more than 300,000 people, including veterans and military casualties from every one of the nation’s wars, are interred in the 624-acre cemetery administered by the Department of the Navy.

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Battle of the Bulge and Spanish American War Nurses Memorials

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Battle of the Bulge and Spanish American War Nurses Memorials
Virginia Western
Image by wallyg
The Battle of the Bulge Memorial (near), a gift from the grateful people of the United Kingdom of Belgium and Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, was dedicated on December 16, 1986. Known to the public as the Battle of the Bulge, the Ardennes Offensive, or Ardennes-Alsace campaign, officially called the Unternehmen Wacht am Rhein (Operation The Guard on the Rhine) by the German Wehrmacht, was a major German offensive through the forested Ardennes Mountains region of Belgium, France and Luxembourg on the Western front. The Germans had Lasting from December 16, 1944 to January 25, 1945, the Germans were turned away as survivors retreated to the defenses of the Siegried Line. With over 800,000 men committed and over 19,000 killed, the Battle of the Bulge became the single biggest and bloodiest battle that American forces experienced in World War II.

The Spanish American War Nurses Memorial (far) was erected by The Society of Spanish American War Nurses to those brave nurses who died during that war, many of whom are buried in Section 21 of Arlington National Cemetery. The Maltese cross, which serves as the insignia of the Society, rests atop a large granite megalith dedicated to the memory of their "brave comrade."

Arlington National Cemetery, a military cemetery directly across the Potomac from Washington, D.c., was established during the Civil War on the grounds of the Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. By 1864, the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria were filled with Union dead. After Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs quickly selected Arlington as a replacement, in part to prevent the Lee’s from ever returning, the government confiscated the land claiming unpaid property taxes. Today, more than 300,000 people, including veterans and military casualties from every one of the nation’s wars, are interred in the 624-acre cemetery administered by the Department of the Navy.