Trench Warfare under Grant and Lee: Field Fortifications in the Overland Campaign (Civil War America)

Trench Warfare under Grant and Lee: Field Fortifications in the Overland Campaign (Civil War America)

In the study of field fortifications in the Civil War that began with Field Armies and Fortifications in the Civil War, Hess turns to the 1864 Overland campaign to cover battles from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. Drawing on meticulous research in primary sources and careful examination of trench remnants at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, and Bermuda Hundred, Hess describes Union and Confederate earthworks and how Grant and Lee used them in this new era of field entrenchments.

List Price: $ 45.95

Price: $ 13.92

Campaign in Western Virginia

Campaign in Western Virginia

Only 250 copies of this slim volume were originally published, shortly after George B. McClellan wrote it in 1863. Now back in print, this text is newly indexed and includes supplemental archival correspondence (including telegraphs) to and from noted individuals during the campaign.

Also features an afterword by noted Civil War author Tim McKinney (Robert E. Lee & the 35th Star.)

List Price: $ 8.95

Price: $ 5.62

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in Austin, TX

Check out these Network advertising images:

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in Austin, TX
Network advertising
Image by Rainforest Action Network
Thanks to the activists in Austin, TX who posted these spoof Chevron posters!

When Chevron rolled out a fancy new ad campaign, we were ready for them. We had only a fraction of Chevron’s budget — the company won’t say how much it spent this time around, but typically spends as much as million on an ad campaign like this — but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage. Go here for the full scoop.

That’s interesting
Network advertising
Image by kevindooley
Last night I read Flickr’s patent on its interestingness algorithm. Patents are not easy to decipher sometimes, especially if they’re written well as this one is, but I think I have some interesting things to share…

(Note: Please don’t confuse the following with a discussion about Explore. Explore depends on interestingness, but getting into Explore depends on a lot more than just interestingness.)

From reading the patent, it seems to me that the entire "Flickr System" is largely built around this notion of interestingness, so anyone who says that popularity and interestingness are not important in Flickr universe is dead wrong. My intuition is that Flickr was designed first as a means to provide superior search results to seekers of "media objects", and second as a social network. It’s interesting to see that the patent description forsees video and other objects, as well as launched advertising specific to the content of the media object (i.e. image).

The basics of the "interestingness score" that Flickr calculates for each of your images have been discussed here and many places: how many faves, comments, notes, views, and where the views come from (e.g. an award group versus an outside search engine). Also discussed elsewhere is the "how many groups" question (answer: 1-5 good, +5 perhaps penalized).

Here are some tidbits from the patent that perhaps are less intuitive…
–Interestingness is affected by how long it’s been since your last upload (it doesn’t say how it takes any of these factors into account by the way!)
–The EXIF camera data is important to have. If you are uploading scanned images (e.g. film) it likely won’t have such data. My recent lomos didn’t get into Explore until I added the EXIF data (I use a Mac, so I used some freeware called "Reveal 1.2").
–Other metadata is important to have. I haven’t done "controlled experiments" on this, but my guess if the title, description, tags, or sets are empty, that decreases interestingness.
–Interestingness is decremented over time (e.g. 2% a day); and is decremented in the presence of metadata (in the title, text, tags, comments, notes) of blacklisted words (you can guess what those are!)

I also found it interesting that an image’s interestingness score can be customized to the requester of the score. For example, if you’ve faved a lot of my pics with a particular tag, then other pics that you haven’t faved but which have the same tag will show up to you as "more interesting".

Of course, in the end, faves and views and comments and all that stuff is the outcome–the cause is having an interesting photo to start with!

(Explore)

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in New York, NY

A few nice Network advertising images I found:

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in New York, NY
Network advertising
Image by Rainforest Action Network
Chevron rolled out a fancy new ad campaign yesterday, and we were ready for them. We had only a fraction of Chevron’s budget — the company won’t say how much it spent this time around, but typically spends as much as million on an ad campaign like this — but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage. Go here for the full scoop.

Punking Chevron’s We Agree Campaign in New York, NY
Network advertising
Image by Rainforest Action Network
Chevron rolled out a fancy new ad campaign yesterday, and we were ready for them. We had only a fraction of Chevron’s budget — the company won’t say how much it spent this time around, but typically spends as much as million on an ad campaign like this — but we had the element of surprise, and we were determined to press our advantage. Go here for the full scoop.

Sprint: Plug into Now. (Interactive Advertising Campaign) / 2010-01-11 / SML Screenshots

A few nice Network advertising images I found:

Sprint: Plug into Now. (Interactive Advertising Campaign) / 2010-01-11 / SML Screenshots
Network advertising
Image by See-ming Lee 李思明 SML
Screenshot: now.sprint.com/widget/

Sprint launched an interactive advertising campaign to promote their mobile broadband network called Now.

The site is realized as a cluster of widget panels, each of which displays one aspects of what’s happening in the world. Rolling each widget gives a bit of data about the world.

Particularly interesting to me is the very witty copy which comes with the voice over. The sound design is also very well done, which mimics the ambience aboard a spaceship. Nice animation. Overall it’s a well executed site. Kudos to the team who created this!

Credits
+ Aaron Dietz, art director
+ Mandy Dietz, writer
+ Christian Haas, creative director
+ Rich Silverstein, executive creative director
+ Tena Goy/Margaret McLaughlin, producers
+ Derek Richmond, executive producer
+ Mike Kellogg, FaceFaceFace, project design and development
+ Goodby, Silverstein & Partners (San Francisco, CA), ad agency

via Didier Lahely on Friendfeed – SML Thank You!

Digital networks
Network advertising
Image by Toban Black
I blurred out two parts of the ad that promise to save people money.

Those portions of the ad suggest that you can save money while spending it;
but I posted this photo to highlight the rest of the ad.