yard, back – cinder blocks & bricks storage – Home Depot color matching – IMG_3464 (20110828)

yard, back – cinder blocks & bricks storage – Home Depot color matching – IMG_3464 (20110828)
Virginia Insurance
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
Just a pic demonstrating our cache of cinder blocks and bricks that we left in the back yard. These are VERY HANDY for ladder stabilization when putting a 16-ft ladder on an earthy, slanted hill. You put the feet of the ladder into the holes in the cinder blocks, then shove the bricks into the remaining space. But DAMN are they HEAVY. We’ve now left some in our back and side yards so that we can stabilize ladders in the future without having to cut our arms up carrying heavy cinder blocks around our yard. So this is where they’ll stay.

That landing stone in front of the door? That used to be under the old outside air conditioning unit, before we upgraded to a heat pump as part of building our addition. It’s bigger/better than the one that was in front of the door originally, which I moved to the left. THROW NOTHING AWAY! Certainly not big-ass squares of useful material.

BTW, this is the kitchen/back door. Rarely used. Accidentally painted the storm door shut and have not not opened it since. Opted not to paint the door itself out of laziness, and the fact that it’s in alright condition other than a permanent stain from ripping kudzu off of it back when the kudzu had gotten under the storm door and grown to the ceiling. Stupid stupid kudzu.

And oh — we also had to paint that pipe. It was green like the house used to be.

Home Depot’s color-matching skills with Behr paint-with-prime vs Behr paint-without-prime leaves a lot to be desired. A LOT. Our color mis-matching here is what you get when you take the same paint back and ask them to match the existing paint. They, er, uh… don’t. No refunds! a gallon paint-with-primer, a gallon paint-without-primer, tons of brushes, paint thinner, rags, elbow grease — And you get this! Mis-matched color!

Home Depot color matching, bricks, cinder blocks, house maintenance, kitchen door, mismatched paint, pipe, planter, shovel, stone, storm door.
after painting.

Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

August 28, 2011.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL.wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL.wordpress.com

BACKSTORY: So our homeowners insurance (Farmers) got dropped due to having peeling paint on our window sills, trees touching our roof, and yard overgrowth (and possibly other reasons I forgot). Weak. Since when did one’s level of yardwork affect insurability? It was a LOT of work AND money for us to repaint all our sills. However, we ended up painting a lot of other things that needed painting too, like this door.

roof – soffit painting – 0 – Clint up on ladder – cinder blocks for stability – left=done, right=todo – IMG_3105 – (20110620)

roof – soffit painting – 0 – Clint up on ladder – cinder blocks for stability – left=done, right=todo – IMG_3105 – (20110620)
Virginia Insurance
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
Way the hell up there! Note how the ladder is balanced by placing its feet inside of cinder blocks (with bricks in the holes to reduce wiggle). Typically the way I held on while painting was to hook a finger behind the trim around window sills or attic vents (or hold on to the edge of the roof), while painting with the other hand. When you’re up so high you can’t reach the ladder, you paint with no hands on ladder.

See the roof edge to my left? Painted. To my right? Still to paint.

You can also see how we are in the middle of painting the window sill (and it’s trim–partially painted in this pic) below, as well as where I used Elmer’s wood filler to build successive filling layers in the bottom right of the sill where it had almost completely rotted out.

Extra paint on the brushes at the end of the day went to fence post tops, then fence posts, then fence tops, then sides, then bottoms. We ended up doing the entire fence with "done for the day" brushes, even though we hadn’t intended to paint the fence.

The small ladder came from Matthew, and saved us a LOT LOT LOT of effort in this job. Compelled us to buy a comparable wooden ladder for at a yard sale later that summer.

Some irony on my t-shirt: It’s the company that paid my wages that paid for buying this house [which only required having 00 liquid cash, and only spending 00 of it] 🙂

Chair on the bottom right? Set of 4 found on a streetside near our house.

Gutter on the bottom right? Later painted gray as well.

Clint.
painting soffit.
caulk, chair, cinder blocks, gutter, house maintenance, ladders, paint brushes, window, wood filler.

roof, Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

June 20, 2011.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL.wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL.wordpress.com

BACKSTORY: You people with modern houses don’t know how good you’ve got it. Did you ever stop to appreciate your plastic soffits? No, you probably don’t even know what a soffit is. I used to be in that blissful ignorance. But then Farmers (and, later, Progressive) dropped our homeowners insurance for having, among other things, peeling paint on our window sills. In 2005 or so, we installed siding on our house at a cost of ,000 to avoid having to spend ,000 on painting our house. But siding doesn’t include window sills! And now they’re peeling. Tasked with weeks of evening and weekend painting, it makes sense to also paint the soffits while painting the window sills. Pretty much the last vestiges of the green color our house used to be are gone — it’s now almost all gray.

cinder block ladder – 9.5 blocks – 1 – IMG_3066-diptych-MG_3065 (20110614)

cinder block ladder – 9.5 blocks – 1 – IMG_3066-diptych-MG_3065 (20110614)
Virginia Insurance
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
This was 100% necessary! And kind of fun! There was no way to set up a ladder to paint this window! Not even a ladder with 20+ configurations like mine! The steps were perpendicular and there was no way to balance a ladder. The wood to the right is too slippery to hold it up safely, and not enough to the left. To go over the fence but under the window would require having the ladder almost completely horizontally. It was NOT happening.

So we had to make a cinder block ladder.

Two cinder blocks for 3 levels: Each level perpendicular to the one underneath it [to prevent rocking]. 1.5 blocks (I was happy to have that half-height block on the bottom left!) to deal with the fact that they hung over the edge of the step. I had to add the vertical cinder block in front as a step onto to get to the top. (Yo dawg, I heard you like steps, so I put steps on your steps so you can step while stepping).

But then the top wasn’t tall enough, so the diagonal block had to be added. It wasn’t originally diagonal, but was turned so to allow control of how far away my face is from what I am painting — because painting something 2 inches in front of your face is AWKWARD! There’s nothing to hold onto other than the trim of the window!

In all, 9.5 cinder blocks were used. And the stack of Peapod bins to the right gave me a place to put my paint tray.

We also painted the stair railing. (I once fell so rapidly that I ripped the railing out of the wall and STILL bled a lot. So I appreciate it more now because my arm would probably have been broken otherwise.)

You can also see the partially-painted fence. Extra paint on the brushes at the end of the day went to fence post tops, then fence posts, then fence tops, then sides, then bottoms. We ended up doing the entire fence with "done for the day" brushes, even though we hadn’t intended to paint the fence.

Peapod bins, cinder block ladder, cinder blocks, fence, gutter guards, house maintenance, stair rail, window.
after painting. diptych.

Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

June 14, 2011.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL.wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL.wordpress.com

BACKSTORY: So our homeowners insurance (Farmers) got dropped due to having peeling paint on our window sills (among other things). Then Progressive took us and did the exact same thing. Weak. It was a LOT of work AND money for us to repaint all our sills. Wood windows SUCK!! Modern vinyl windows are MAINTANENCE-FREE!! Wood windows… You gotta re-glaze the panes when they fall out, and then the wood itself is always going to rot. What a pain!