Smethwick council buying vacant homes to prevent more coloured people moving in on Marshall Street

Video 3 of 3 In 1964 Peter Griffiths, Conservative candidate in Smethwick constituency won his seat using the slogan “If you want a nigger for a neighbour VOTE LABOR” The general election was won by Labour, overturning 13 years of Conservative government. In contrast, largely because of the race issue, a Labour majority of 3544 was turned into a Tory majority of 1774, defeating the senior Labour MP Patrick Gordon in Smethwick. The “nigger for a neighbour” slogan was attributed to the Griffiths campaign in a BBC interview by Labour leader Harold Wilson. Griffiths denied using those words, but said that they accurately reflected the frustrations of locals. Immediately after the election Wilson (as prime minister) attacked Griffiths in the House of Commons, calling him the “parliamentary leper”. Additionally the Tories had also taken control of the local council, instituting a policy on Marshall Street of buying houses which came up for sale and putting them back on the market for sale to whites only. In an attempt to better-integrated immigrants. Soon after, Americas Malcolm X visited Marshall Street and was interviewed, saying: “I have come here because I am disturbed by reports that coloured people in Smethwick are being badly treated. I have heard they are being treated as the Jews under Hitler. I would not wait for the fascist element in Smethwick to erect gas ovens.” Malcolm X was shot dead in Harlem days after his return from this trip. Later that year in October a
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Software Channel Leadership Council Proceedings: Increasing Partner Engagement

Software Channel Leadership Council Proceedings: Increasing Partner Engagement

This IDC update summarizes the key findings and participant feedback from the Software Channel Leadership Council (SCLC) summit held on December 2, 2009, in Palo Alto, California. The theme of the day was “Partner Engagement,” building on top of IDC’s research effort on the topic. Event participants included 22 software vendor executives, IDC software partnering analysts, and four partners (that attended a portion of the afternoon session). This document focuses on the feedback and perceptions of the participants regarding the three main sessions during the day, including:

  • IDC research presentation: Partner engagement
  • Partner engagement partner panel discussion
  • Breakout group presentations: Six approaches to improved partner engagement

List Price: $ 2,000.00

Price: $ 2,000.00

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the Virginia Council on Human Relations, on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery, located just outside the Special Collections Research Center on the first floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from October 17, 2011 through April 15, 2012.

The following are transcriptions of the label text presented in this case:

Jobs

The Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR)
advocated for and offered assistance to businesses and employers to implement what was known as "merit employment." The Virginia Equal Job Opportunity Bureau (VEJOB) was established to assist businesses prepared to adopt personnel policies based on equal opportunity without regard to race, ethnicity, or religion. VEJOB was partially funded by a grant the VCHR received and a staff member was hired to serve as the director. However, the VEJOB folded within a short time of its organization, when further funding was not secured. The VCHR specifically appealed to those businesses competing for federal contracts impacted by Executive Orders with non-discrimination provisions and also to the overall competitiveness of Virginia business and industry.

Schools

The matter of school desegregation was a major issue for the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR). The VCHR monitored actions in Prince Edward County and other Virginia localities, where county officials had closed their public schools in an effort to block school desegregation. With a multi-faceted approach of fact-finding, education, publicity, negotiation, and persuasion, the VCHR sought to further the cause of school desegregation. Ultimately, Prince Edward County public schools were closed for 5 years during the period of Massive Resistance in Virginia.

Rev. Heslip M. “Happy” Lee

Portrait of Heslip M. Lee
Courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives
James Branch Cabell Library
Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

The Rev. Heslip M. "Happy" Lee worked during the height of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. He moved to Virginia in the late 1950s and later served as an active Executive Director of the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR) until 1964. He worked to
increase both the number of local VCHR groups and its overall membership, spoke to numerous groups, and helped in the desegregation of public facilities in Virginia.

THINGS ARE HAPPENING
ACROSS THE OLD DOMINION
Key
Eating Establishments
Hotels and Motels
Theaters
Police Forces
Schools
Biracial Commissions
All White Committee

Unless otherwise indicated, all material is from the Virginia Council of Human Relations Records, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the Virginia Council on Human Relations, on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery, located just outside the Special Collections Research Center on the first floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from October 17, 2011 through April 15, 2012.

The following are transcriptions of the label text presented in this case:

Jobs

The Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR)
advocated for and offered assistance to businesses and employers to implement what was known as "merit employment." The Virginia Equal Job Opportunity Bureau (VEJOB) was established to assist businesses prepared to adopt personnel policies based on equal opportunity without regard to race, ethnicity, or religion. VEJOB was partially funded by a grant the VCHR received and a staff member was hired to serve as the director. However, the VEJOB folded within a short time of its organization, when further funding was not secured. The VCHR specifically appealed to those businesses competing for federal contracts impacted by Executive Orders with non-discrimination provisions and also to the overall competitiveness of Virginia business and industry.

Schools

The matter of school desegregation was a major issue for the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR). The VCHR monitored actions in Prince Edward County and other Virginia localities, where county officials had closed their public schools in an effort to block school desegregation. With a multi-faceted approach of fact-finding, education, publicity, negotiation, and persuasion, the VCHR sought to further the cause of school desegregation. Ultimately, Prince Edward County public schools were closed for 5 years during the period of Massive Resistance in Virginia.

Rev. Heslip M. “Happy” Lee

Portrait of Heslip M. Lee
Courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives
James Branch Cabell Library
Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

The Rev. Heslip M. "Happy" Lee worked during the height of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. He moved to Virginia in the late 1950s and later served as an active Executive Director of the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR) until 1964. He worked to
increase both the number of local VCHR groups and its overall membership, spoke to numerous groups, and helped in the desegregation of public facilities in Virginia.

THINGS ARE HAPPENING
ACROSS THE OLD DOMINION
Key
Eating Establishments
Hotels and Motels
Theaters
Police Forces
Schools
Biracial Commissions
All White Committee

Unless otherwise indicated, all material is from the Virginia Council of Human Relations Records, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the Virginia Council on Human Relations, on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery, located just outside the Special Collections Research Center on the first floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from October 17, 2011 through April 15, 2012.

The following are transcriptions of the label text presented in this case:

Jobs

The Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR)
advocated for and offered assistance to businesses and employers to implement what was known as "merit employment." The Virginia Equal Job Opportunity Bureau (VEJOB) was established to assist businesses prepared to adopt personnel policies based on equal opportunity without regard to race, ethnicity, or religion. VEJOB was partially funded by a grant the VCHR received and a staff member was hired to serve as the director. However, the VEJOB folded within a short time of its organization, when further funding was not secured. The VCHR specifically appealed to those businesses competing for federal contracts impacted by Executive Orders with non-discrimination provisions and also to the overall competitiveness of Virginia business and industry.

Schools

The matter of school desegregation was a major issue for the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR). The VCHR monitored actions in Prince Edward County and other Virginia localities, where county officials had closed their public schools in an effort to block school desegregation. With a multi-faceted approach of fact-finding, education, publicity, negotiation, and persuasion, the VCHR sought to further the cause of school desegregation. Ultimately, Prince Edward County public schools were closed for 5 years during the period of Massive Resistance in Virginia.

Rev. Heslip M. “Happy” Lee

Portrait of Heslip M. Lee
Courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives
James Branch Cabell Library
Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

The Rev. Heslip M. "Happy" Lee worked during the height of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. He moved to Virginia in the late 1950s and later served as an active Executive Director of the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR) until 1964. He worked to
increase both the number of local VCHR groups and its overall membership, spoke to numerous groups, and helped in the desegregation of public facilities in Virginia.

THINGS ARE HAPPENING
ACROSS THE OLD DOMINION
Key
Eating Establishments
Hotels and Motels
Theaters
Police Forces
Schools
Biracial Commissions
All White Committee

Unless otherwise indicated, all material is from the Virginia Council of Human Relations Records, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the Virginia Council on Human Relations, on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery, located just outside the Special Collections Research Center on the first floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from October 17, 2011 through April 15, 2012.

The following are transcriptions of the label text presented in this case:

Jobs

The Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR)
advocated for and offered assistance to businesses and employers to implement what was known as "merit employment." The Virginia Equal Job Opportunity Bureau (VEJOB) was established to assist businesses prepared to adopt personnel policies based on equal opportunity without regard to race, ethnicity, or religion. VEJOB was partially funded by a grant the VCHR received and a staff member was hired to serve as the director. However, the VEJOB folded within a short time of its organization, when further funding was not secured. The VCHR specifically appealed to those businesses competing for federal contracts impacted by Executive Orders with non-discrimination provisions and also to the overall competitiveness of Virginia business and industry.

Schools

The matter of school desegregation was a major issue for the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR). The VCHR monitored actions in Prince Edward County and other Virginia localities, where county officials had closed their public schools in an effort to block school desegregation. With a multi-faceted approach of fact-finding, education, publicity, negotiation, and persuasion, the VCHR sought to further the cause of school desegregation. Ultimately, Prince Edward County public schools were closed for 5 years during the period of Massive Resistance in Virginia.

Rev. Heslip M. “Happy” Lee

Portrait of Heslip M. Lee
Courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives
James Branch Cabell Library
Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

The Rev. Heslip M. "Happy" Lee worked during the height of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. He moved to Virginia in the late 1950s and later served as an active Executive Director of the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR) until 1964. He worked to
increase both the number of local VCHR groups and its overall membership, spoke to numerous groups, and helped in the desegregation of public facilities in Virginia.

THINGS ARE HAPPENING
ACROSS THE OLD DOMINION
Key
Eating Establishments
Hotels and Motels
Theaters
Police Forces
Schools
Biracial Commissions
All White Committee

Unless otherwise indicated, all material is from the Virginia Council of Human Relations Records, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit

Virginia Council on Human Relations Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the Virginia Council on Human Relations, on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery, located just outside the Special Collections Research Center on the first floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from October 17, 2011 through April 15, 2012.

The following are transcriptions of the label text presented in this case:

Jobs

The Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR)
advocated for and offered assistance to businesses and employers to implement what was known as "merit employment." The Virginia Equal Job Opportunity Bureau (VEJOB) was established to assist businesses prepared to adopt personnel policies based on equal opportunity without regard to race, ethnicity, or religion. VEJOB was partially funded by a grant the VCHR received and a staff member was hired to serve as the director. However, the VEJOB folded within a short time of its organization, when further funding was not secured. The VCHR specifically appealed to those businesses competing for federal contracts impacted by Executive Orders with non-discrimination provisions and also to the overall competitiveness of Virginia business and industry.

Schools

The matter of school desegregation was a major issue for the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR). The VCHR monitored actions in Prince Edward County and other Virginia localities, where county officials had closed their public schools in an effort to block school desegregation. With a multi-faceted approach of fact-finding, education, publicity, negotiation, and persuasion, the VCHR sought to further the cause of school desegregation. Ultimately, Prince Edward County public schools were closed for 5 years during the period of Massive Resistance in Virginia.

Rev. Heslip M. “Happy” Lee

Portrait of Heslip M. Lee
Courtesy of the Special Collections and Archives
James Branch Cabell Library
Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries

The Rev. Heslip M. "Happy" Lee worked during the height of the struggle for Civil Rights in the U.S. He moved to Virginia in the late 1950s and later served as an active Executive Director of the Virginia Council on Human Relations (VCHR) until 1964. He worked to
increase both the number of local VCHR groups and its overall membership, spoke to numerous groups, and helped in the desegregation of public facilities in Virginia.

THINGS ARE HAPPENING
ACROSS THE OLD DOMINION
Key
Eating Establishments
Hotels and Motels
Theaters
Police Forces
Schools
Biracial Commissions
All White Committee

Unless otherwise indicated, all material is from the Virginia Council of Human Relations Records, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance

Addresses and Historical Papers Before the Centennial Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Virginia, at Its Meetings in

Addresses and Historical Papers Before the Centennial Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Virginia, at Its Meetings in

The book has no illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from the publisher’s website (GeneralBooksClub.com). You can also preview excerpts of the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Title: Addresses and Historical Papers Before the Centennial Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of Virginia, at Its Meetings in St. Paul’s and St. John’s Churches, in Richmond, May 20-24, 1885; Original Publisher: New York, T. Whittaker; Publication date: 1885; Subjects: Virginia;

List Price: $ 20.00

Price: $ 20.00

More Virginia Llc Products

Legislative Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia..

Legislative Journals of the Council of Colonial Virginia..

Publisher: Richmond, Va. : [The Colonial Press, Everett Waddey Co.] Publication date: 1918 Notes: This is an OCR reprint. There may be typos or missing text. There are no illustrations or indexes. When you buy the General Books edition of this book you get free trial access to Million-Books.com where you can select from more than a million books for free. You can also preview the book there.

List Price: $ 54.85

Price: $ 54.85

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NCCI scores victory for WC insurers in Virginia. (National Council on Compensation Insurance, workers’ compensation): An article from: National Underwriter … & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management

NCCI scores victory for WC insurers in Virginia. (National Council on Compensation Insurance, workers’ compensation): An article from: National Underwriter … & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management

This digital document is an article from National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management, published by The National Underwriter Company on April 19, 1993. The length of the article is 486 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

From the supplier: The National Council on Compensation Insurance (NCCI) praised Virginia Gov L. Douglas Wilder and the state legislature for the Apr 7, 1993 enactment of a law that will end a six-year battle over workers’ compensation (WC) insurance rate increases. WC insurance rate increases will be based on NCCI filings of state insurer loss cost data and member company’s individual rates when the law becomes effective on Jan 1, 1994. Insurance company prices and services will be the competitive criteria used in marketing WC insurance.

Citation Details
Title: NCCI scores victory for WC insurers in Virginia. (National Council on Compensation Insurance, workers’ compensation)
Author: Robert G. Knowles
Publication: National Underwriter Property & Casualty-Risk & Benefits Management (Magazine/Journal)
Date: April 19, 1993
Publisher: The National Underwriter Company
Issue: n16 Page: p7(1)

Distributed by Thomson Gale

List Price: $ 5.95

Price: $ 5.95