Loaded Coal Cars Sit in the Rail Yards at Danville, West Virginia, near Charleston. Awaiting Shipment to Customers…04/1974

Loaded Coal Cars Sit in the Rail Yards at Danville, West Virginia, near Charleston. Awaiting Shipment to Customers…04/1974
Colleges In Virginia
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Loaded Coal Cars Sit in the Rail Yards at Danville, West Virginia, near Charleston. Awaiting Shipment to Customers. It Is One of the Largest Transshipment Points for Coal in the World. A Constant Stream of Rail Cars Is Moved in and Out of the Small Town 04/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-13957

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
Charleston (Kanawha county, West Virginia, United States) inhabited place
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556409

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Kentucky Farm Land Mobile Home for sale – seller will finance Danville, KY

more images and info at www.StarHomeUSA.com Super nice manufactured home – in one of our best communities. 2 miles to Super Wal-Mart, Office Depot, Lowe’s and Cracker Barrel – this location couldn’t be better. 14×80 manufactured home, 3 large brs, 2 baths, Fireplace with Italian, Black Marble Hearth, garden tub, deck, massive 14′ Master BR, move in condition – end of the street – end lot with huge yard for flowers, garden, etc. Oakview Commons offers Pro Volleyball, tetherball – for kids of all ages ;-), BBQ grill, picnic table, fire pit, horseshoes, 3 plank-horse fence, school bus shelter, soda machine, 24 hr lighting, Community living, etc – I could go on and on. Oakview Commons is a must-see Community and this is a Must-See home. 859-319-5000 Mobile Homes for sale in Kentucky
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Kentucky Farm Land Mobile Home for sale – owner will finance Danville, KY

more images and info at www.StarHomeUSA.com 859-319-5000 Mobile Homes for sale in Kentucky KY Super nice manufactured home – in one of our best communities. 2 miles to Super Wal-Mart, Office Depot, Lowe’s and Starbucks – this location couldn’t be better. 14×80 manufactured home, 3 large brs, 2 baths, Fireplace with Italian, Black Marble Hearth, garden tub, deck, massive 14′ Master BR, move in condition – end of the street – end lot with huge yard for flowers, garden, etc. Oakview Commons offers Pro Volleyball, tetherball – for kids of all ages ;-), BBQ grill, picnic table, fire pit, horseshoes, 3 plank-horse fence, school bus shelter, soda machine, 24 hr lighting, Community living, etc – I could go on and on. Oakview Commons is a must-see Community and this is a Must-See home.

Danville, KY mobile home Owner will Finance near WalMart and Centre College

www.StarHomeUSA.com for more info and prices. 2 miles to WalMart SuperCenter, Cracker Barrel, McDs, Office Depot, etc, etc, etc. Call today – this home will not last long on the market. 859-319-5000 or 4000 859-319-5000 Mobile Homes for sale in Kentucky
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Aerial of Williamson, West Virginia, Showing the Coal Rail Yards and the River That Divides Kentucky at the Upper Left and West Virginia. The Town Has the Largest Coal Train Yard in the World, Followed by Danville, West Virginia 04/1974

Aerial of Williamson, West Virginia, Showing the Coal Rail Yards and the River That Divides Kentucky at the Upper Left and West Virginia. The Town Has the Largest Coal Train Yard in the World, Followed by Danville, West Virginia 04/1974
Virginia Western
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Aerial of Williamson, West Virginia, Showing the Coal Rail Yards and the River That Divides Kentucky at the Upper Left and West Virginia. The Town Has the Largest Coal Train Yard in the World, Followed by Danville, West Virginia 04/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-14012

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
West Virginia (United States) state
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: http://arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556464

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Buy copies of selected National Archives photographs and documents at the National Archives Print Shop online: gallery.pictopia.com/natf/photo/

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Masonic Temple, Danville 5

Masonic Temple, Danville 5
Virginia Insurance
Image by Universal Pops
The Masonic Temple (1921) in Danville is located at 105 S. Union Street in the Danville Historic District [Virginia Department of Historic Resources ID 108-0111-065]. It is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Danville prospered for many years as a tobacco and textile center.

The building designed by West Virginia architect Fred F. Farris, cost 0,000 to build in 1921. It is fire-proof and was Danville’s first skyscraper; the styling is eclectic. It has two 10-story blocks of concrete and steel with a face of glazed, white architectural terra-cotta. The basic shape is in the form of a “U”. At the center of the “U” is a Tudor arched screen, a sculpted eagle crowning the entrance. Gothic ornamentation decorates the metal awning below the arch. Elaborate relief work follows the curved of the arch and is continued on both sides of the lobby entrance. The lobby ceiling had been dropped, hiding a barrel-vaulted skylight; but it will eventually be restored to its former state. Some nice relief work is above the doors to the elevators, the original ones installed at the time of construction.

At the base of the building are bays with Tudor arches containing various shops. A reason the building is so tall was to accommodate offices for various professionals—insurance companies, utilities, lawyers, doctors, dentists, etc. The styling of most floors is utilitarian, windows being 3 over 3; on the 9th floor the windows are taller and 6 over 6. Windows on the 10th level have Tudor arches between ornamented capitals

I was unable to tour the interior, which apparently has some spectacular rooms. I was fortunate enough to meet a member of the owner’s family, who provided some details on the structure. I was in Danville around 9 in the morning when these photos were taken; the lighting was not the best, but I wasn’t about to let the opportunity pass.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

Masonic Temple, Danville 4

Masonic Temple, Danville 4
Virginia Insurance
Image by Universal Pops
The Masonic Temple (1921) in Danville is located at 105 S. Union Street in the Danville Historic District [Virginia Department of Historic Resources ID 108-0111-065]. It is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Danville prospered for many years as a tobacco and textile center.

The building designed by West Virginia architect Fred F. Farris, cost 0,000 to build in 1921. It is fire-proof and was Danville’s first skyscraper; the styling is eclectic. It has two 10-story blocks of concrete and steel with a face of glazed, white architectural terra-cotta. The basic shape is in the form of a “U”. At the center of the “U” is a Tudor arched screen, a sculpted eagle crowning the entrance. Gothic ornamentation decorates the metal awning below the arch. Elaborate relief work follows the curved of the arch and is continued on both sides of the lobby entrance. The lobby ceiling had been dropped, hiding a barrel-vaulted skylight; but it will eventually be restored to its former state. Some nice relief work is above the doors to the elevators, the original ones installed at the time of construction.

At the base of the building are bays with Tudor arches containing various shops. A reason the building is so tall was to accommodate offices for various professionals—insurance companies, utilities, lawyers, doctors, dentists, etc. The styling of most floors is utilitarian, windows being 3 over 3; on the 9th floor the windows are taller and 6 over 6. Windows on the 10th level have Tudor arches between ornamented capitals

I was unable to tour the interior, which apparently has some spectacular rooms. I was fortunate enough to meet a member of the owner’s family, who provided some details on the structure. I was in Danville around 9 in the morning when these photos were taken; the lighting was not the best, but I wasn’t about to let the opportunity pass.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

Masonic Temple, Danville 6

Masonic Temple, Danville 6
Virginia Insurance
Image by Universal Pops
The Masonic Temple (1921) in Danville is located at 105 S. Union Street in the Danville Historic District [Virginia Department of Historic Resources ID 108-0111-065]. It is also listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Danville prospered for many years as a tobacco and textile center.

The building designed by West Virginia architect Fred F. Farris, cost 0,000 to build in 1921. It is fire-proof and was Danville’s first skyscraper; the styling is eclectic. It has two 10-story blocks of concrete and steel with a face of glazed, white architectural terra-cotta. The basic shape is in the form of a “U”. At the center of the “U” is a Tudor arched screen, a sculpted eagle crowning the entrance. Gothic ornamentation decorates the metal awning below the arch. Elaborate relief work follows the curved of the arch and is continued on both sides of the lobby entrance. The lobby ceiling had been dropped, hiding a barrel-vaulted skylight; but it will eventually be restored to its former state. Some nice relief work is above the doors to the elevators, the original ones installed at the time of construction.

At the base of the building are bays with Tudor arches containing various shops. A reason the building is so tall was to accommodate offices for various professionals—insurance companies, utilities, lawyers, doctors, dentists, etc. The styling of most floors is utilitarian, windows being 3 over 3; on the 9th floor the windows are taller and 6 over 6. Windows on the 10th level have Tudor arches between ornamented capitals

I was unable to tour the interior, which apparently has some spectacular rooms. I was fortunate enough to meet a member of the owner’s family, who provided some details on the structure. I was in Danville around 9 in the morning when these photos were taken; the lighting was not the best, but I wasn’t about to let the opportunity pass.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License