Williams President Henry Hopkins 1902

Williams President Henry Hopkins 1902
Colleges In Virginia
Image by ledges
From the Williams College website (http://williams.edu/home/presidents/#HHopkins):

Henry Hopkins, son of Mark Hopkins, the most famous and longest tenured president of Williams College, was born on November 30, 1837. He grew up in Williamstown, and graduated from Williams in 1858, while his father was in the middle of his presidency. Henry then studied theology for two years at Union Seminary and for a year under the expert tutelage of his father before being ordained as a minister in the fall of 1861.

Hopkins served as a chaplain during the Civil War, stationed at the Federal Hospital in Alexandria, Virginia after a personal commission from President Lincoln. He headed the ambulance corps at the battlefields of Chantilly and Bull Run, and then enlisted as a field chaplain in the New York Infantry in May of 1864.

When the war finished, Hopkins returned to Massachusetts as the pastor of the Second Congregational Church in Westfield. After fifteen years there, he was called to Kansas City where he was a pastor for twenty-two years, until he assumed the role of president at Williams in 1902, stepping in as the permanent replacement after the short and interim tenure of Henry Haskell Hewitt.

Hopkins was inaugurated with much fanfare during the commencement exercises on June 24, 1902. Delegates from twenty-three other schools and many alumni returned to honor both the new president and the memory of his father. In his address, Hopkins praised the ideal of a liberal arts education, calling for the continuation of generalized study amid the nation’s new demand for specialists.

Hopkins first major action was to restructure the college’s curriculum. A committee from the faculty oversaw the drafting of new guidelines, and the faculty as a whole accepted the program without a single vote of dissent. The new curriculum laid out a proscribed program focusing on the humanities for freshman, with more choices allowed for upperclassmen. Hopkins also oversaw the erection of Thompson Memorial Chapel and other buildings, the lengthening of the term, and the improvement of student-faculty relations.

Hopkins resigned in 1908, at the age of seventy, as planned. Very soon afterwards, he set off for Europe with his family, but fell ill during the voyage. He died in Rotterdam on August 28, 1908.

Many Infallible Proofs by Henry Morris

Quotes by Evolutionary Scientists Against Evolution – www.warneveryone.com Live broadcasting with instant message – www.justin.tv Henry M. Morris, Ph.D. Hydraulic Engineering (Founder and President Emeritus of ICR) He has a BS from Rice University with honors in Civil Engineering and MS and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Morris majored in engineering hydraulics/hydrology while minoring in Geology and Mathematics. He has served on the faculties of Rice University, the University of Minnesota, the University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Southern Illinois University. From 1957 to 1970 he was Head of the Department of Civil Engineering at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). While at Virginia Tech, Dr. Morris was able to get approval for Ph.D. programs in Civil Engineering and Hydraulics. Dr. Morris authored Applied Hydraulics in Engineering, which has been used by over 100 colleges and universities at one time or another. It is still used today as a reference and even the main text in some university classes. As of 1993 and 30 years after the first edition was printed, there was no comparable textbook available. The Evolution Handbook – www.evolution-facts.org
Video Rating: 3 / 5

Alex Veatch – Admissions Counselor for Emory & Henry College

Meet Alex, an admissions counselor at Emory & Henry College. Alex works with students from the Richmond and Fredricksburg areas, along with Ohio, West Virginia and the entire Northeast region. Emory & Henry is consistently honored for its achievements and is ranked on the national level. Among its recent honors was the 2009 Presidential Award for Service Learning, the highest national recognition for community service and service learning. In addition, Emory & Henry is ranked among the top 30 liberal arts colleges and universities in the nation by Washington Monthly and among the first tier of national liberal arts colleges by US News & World Report. Newsweek ranks Emory & Henry No. 4 among all institutions in the nation in providing effective community service and service learning.

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Preventing Dialogue

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Preventing Dialogue
Colleges In Virginia
Image by quixoticlife
Armed police prevented Equality Riders from entering campus and dialoguing with students, or even inviting students to a public presentation and dialogue off-campus.

The Soulforce Equality Ride traveled to Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, to attempt to dialogue with students about the college’s religious-based discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer and transgender students. The Riders and dozens of community members, who were committed to and trained for nonviolence, were barred from campus and met with more than 100 armed state police.

For coverage and an excellent short video on the nonviolent vigil for queer rights at Patrick Henry College, see "Young, Gay Christians, On a Bumpy Bus Ride," in The Washington Post, April 13, 2007. An account and video from a Rider is available at www.interstateq.com/archives/1978/, and more photos can be found at www.adambritt.net/photos/Events/PHC.html.

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Police Presence

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Police Presence
Colleges In Virginia
Image by quixoticlife
Seen in the background are some of the more than 100 armed state police who greeted the nonviolent Equality Riders.

The Soulforce Equality Ride traveled to Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, to attempt to dialogue with students about the college’s religious-based discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer and transgender students. The Riders and dozens of community members, who were committed to and trained for nonviolence, were barred from campus and met with more than 100 armed state police.

For coverage and an excellent short video on the nonviolent vigil for queer rights at Patrick Henry College, see "Young, Gay Christians, On a Bumpy Bus Ride," in The Washington Post, April 13, 2007. An account and video from a Rider is available at www.interstateq.com/archives/1978/, and more photos can be found at www.adambritt.net/photos/Events/PHC.html.

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Holding the Line

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Holding the Line
Colleges In Virginia
Image by quixoticlife
Equality Riders and community members held a silent vigil at the edge of campus, punctuated only by periodic singing of hymns and speaking of Biblical verses.

The Soulforce Equality Ride traveled to Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, to attempt to dialogue with students about the college’s religious-based discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer and transgender students. The Riders and dozens of community members, who were committed to and trained for nonviolence, were barred from campus and met with more than 100 armed state police.

For coverage and an excellent short video on the nonviolent vigil for queer rights at Patrick Henry College, see "Young, Gay Christians, On a Bumpy Bus Ride," in The Washington Post, April 13, 2007. An account and video from a Rider is available at www.interstateq.com/archives/1978/, and more photos can be found at www.adambritt.net/photos/Events/PHC.html.

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Silent Vigil

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Silent Vigil
Colleges In Virginia
Image by quixoticlife
Equality Riders and community members held a silent vigil at the edge of campus, asking only for dialogue with Patrick Henry College students.

The Soulforce Equality Ride traveled to Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, to attempt to dialogue with students about the college’s religious-based discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer and transgender students. The Riders and dozens of community members, who were committed to and trained for nonviolence, were barred from campus and met with more than 100 armed state police.

For coverage and an excellent short video on the nonviolent vigil for queer rights at Patrick Henry College, see "Young, Gay Christians, On a Bumpy Bus Ride," in The Washington Post, April 13, 2007. An account and video from a Rider is available at www.interstateq.com/archives/1978/, and more photos can be found at www.adambritt.net/photos/Events/PHC.html.

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Holding the Line

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Holding the Line
Colleges In Virginia
Image by quixoticlife
The Equality Riders’ vigil was nonviolent, spiritually-based witnessing for an end to religious-based oppression.

The Soulforce Equality Ride traveled to Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, to attempt to dialogue with students about the college’s religious-based discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer and transgender students. The Riders and dozens of community members, who were committed to and trained for nonviolence, were barred from campus and met with more than 100 armed state police.

For coverage and an excellent short video on the nonviolent vigil for queer rights at Patrick Henry College, see "Young, Gay Christians, On a Bumpy Bus Ride," in The Washington Post, April 13, 2007. An account and video from a Rider is available at www.interstateq.com/archives/1978/, and more photos can be found at www.adambritt.net/photos/Events/PHC.html.

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Police Guard Entrance

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Police Guard Entrance
Colleges In Virginia
Image by quixoticlife
More than 100 armed state police met the nonviolent Equality Riders.

The Soulforce Equality Ride traveled to Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, to attempt to dialogue with students about the college’s religious-based discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer and transgender students. The Riders and dozens of community members, who were committed to and trained for nonviolence, were barred from campus and met with more than 100 armed state police.

For coverage and an excellent short video on the nonviolent vigil for queer rights at Patrick Henry College, see "Young, Gay Christians, On a Bumpy Bus Ride," in The Washington Post, April 13, 2007. An account and video from a Rider is available at www.interstateq.com/archives/1978/, and more photos can be found at www.adambritt.net/photos/Events/PHC.html.

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Through the Rain

Soulforce Equality Ride-Patrick Henry College: Through the Rain
Colleges In Virginia
Image by quixoticlife
Equality Riders stood in silent vigil even as rain and hail began to fall.

The Soulforce Equality Ride traveled to Patrick Henry College in Purcellville, Virginia, to attempt to dialogue with students about the college’s religious-based discrimination against gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer and transgender students. The Riders and dozens of community members, who were committed to and trained for nonviolence, were barred from campus and met with more than 100 armed state police.

For coverage and an excellent short video on the nonviolent vigil for queer rights at Patrick Henry College, see "Young, Gay Christians, On a Bumpy Bus Ride," in The Washington Post, April 13, 2007. An account and video from a Rider is available at www.interstateq.com/archives/1978/, and more photos can be found at www.adambritt.net/photos/Events/PHC.html.