Media portrayal of mental illness a negative influence on adolescents?

Question by Autumn: Media portrayal of mental illness a negative influence on adolescents?
I am doing a research on how movies and television portrayals of mental illness have a negative influence on adolescents.

I’m looking for movies to use as an example. Anything that has to do with mental illness (broad topic) and how it might affect adolescent audiences in a negative way.

I just need titles and suggestions. Thanks!

Best answer:

Answer by Doodle
Here are a list of films about mental disorders but I believe they could only have a negaive affect on teens who are already struggling with depression, substance abuse, etc.,

This summary was derived from several of the articles listed in the resource list, from the suggestions of our ADMSEP colleagues, and from our own personal experience. We have not personally reviewed all of the movies on the list, and suggest you view any film before choosing it for teaching purposes.

Axis I Disorders

Anxiety and Anxiety Disorders Bipolar Disorder/Mania
Copycat (panic/agoraphobia) Mr. Jones
As good as it gets (OCD) Network
The touching tree (Childhood OCD) Seven Percent Solution
Fourth of July (PTSD) Captain Newman, MD
The Deer Hunter (PTSD) Sophieís Choice
Ordinary People (PTSD) Sheís So Lovely

Depression Psychosis
Ordinary People Shine
Faithful I Never Promised You a Rose Garden
The Seventh Veil Clean Shaven
The Shrike Through a Glass Darkly
Itís a Wonderful Life (Adjustment disorder) An Angel at my Table
The Wrong Man (Adjustment disorder) Personal
Dissociative Disorders Man Facing Southwest
The Three Faces of Eve Madness of King George (Psychosis due to Porphyria)
Sybil Conspiracy Theory

Delirium
The Singing Detective

Substance Abuse
The Long Weekend (etoh) The Days of Wine and Roses (etoh)
Barfly (etoh) Basketball Diaries (opiates)
Kids (hallucinogens, rave scenes, etc.) Loosing Isaiah (crack)
Reefer Madness Under the Volcano
Long Day’s Journey into Night Ironweed
The Man with the Golden Arm (heroin) A Hatful of Rain (heroin)
Synanon (drug treatment) The Boost (cocaine)
The 7 Percent Solution (cocaine induced mania) Iím Dancing as Fast as I can (substance induced organic mental disorder)

Eating Disorders
The Best Little Girl in the World (made for TV)-Anorexia Kateís Secret (made for TV)-Bulemia

Axis II Disorders

Personality Pathology
Cluster A Cluster B
Remains of the Day- Schizoid PD Borderline PD
Taxi Driver-Schizotypal PD Fatal Attraction
The Caine Mutiny- Paranoid PD Play Misty for Me
The Treasure of Sierra Madre -Paranoid PD Frances
After Hours
Cluster C Looking for Mr. Goodbar
Zelig-Avoidant PD
Sophieís Choice-Dependent PD Histrionic PD
The Odd Couple-OCPD Bullets over Broadway
Gone with the Wind
A Streetcare Named Desire

Antisocial PD
A Clockwork Orange

Narcissism Obsession
All that Jazz Taxi Driver
Stardust Memories Single White Female
Zelig The King of Comedy
Jerry Maguire Triumph of Will
Alfie
Shampoo Mental Retardation
American Gigolo Charly
Citizen Kane Best Boy
Lawrence of Arabia Bill
Patton Bill, On His Own

Miscellaneous Issues

Family Early Adult Issues
Ordinary People Awakenings
The Field The Graduate
Kramer vs Kramer Spanking the Monkey
Diary of a Mad Housewife
Betrayal Latency and Adolescent Issues
Whoís Afraid of Virginia Woolfe Stand by Me
The Stone Boy Smooth Talk
The Great Santini

Doctor/Patient Relationship Boundary Violations
The Doctor The Prince of Tides
Mr. Jones

Idealized “Dr. Marvelous” Psychotherapy
Spellbound Suddenly Last Summer
The Snake Pit Captain Newman, MD
The Three Faces of Eve Ordinary People
Good Will Hunting

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

How did the revolutionary war influence the thought, opinion and behavior of american people?

Question by drs823: How did the revolutionary war influence the thought, opinion and behavior of american people?
how did american people change during the war? their thoughts, opinions, and behaviors?

Best answer:

Answer by Butcher Bird
“Ordinary people” is a broad term. In the port towns it covered seafarers, laborers, apprentices, journeymen artisans, master craftsmen, tavern keepers, and even small merchants. In the right circumstances it could cover slaves, though describing a crowd as comprising “sailors, Negroes, and boys” was a standard way to disown it. Crowd action was a normal part of eighteenth-century urban life. Some crowds amounted to a whole community defending itself when the militia, the sheriff’s posse, or the volunteer fire company could not. Even gentlemen might be involved, perhaps disguised in costume or a workingman’s long trousers.
Crowd action also could have a class content. Seafarers, rather than all “town-born,” frustrated an attempt in 1747 to impress them off the Boston streets into the Royal Navy. Crowds could be rough, but they also could be sophisticated. Boston workingmen paraded with effigies each autumn on “Pope’s Day” (5 November), which celebrated the unmasking of the seventeenth-century Gun-powder Plot to bomb Parliament. They were keeping alive their sense that to be British meant more than doing whatever Parliament said. It was to be Protestant and free, and on that day the crowd of Protestant freemen ruled Boston’s streets.
For the most part these uprisings were traditional, aimed at restoring how things ought to be, but during the Stamp Act crisis of 1765–1766 a transformation began. An intercolonial network of Sons of Liberty emerged, combining militancy with political direction. For the most part they were men in the middle, not real plebeians but not gentry either. In Boston Samuel Adams was Harvard educated but very much a popular politician. Adams could (and often did) argue with the governor, but he also could talk to people like shoemaker Ebenezer Macintosh, who led one of the Pope’s Day crowds. Macintosh brought out the crowds on 14 August 1765, in order to “convince” stamp distributor Andrew Oliver that he should resign before the Stamp Act even took force. Boston’s depressed economy helps explain the crowd’s intense anger.
Newport, New York City, and other places followed Boston’s lead. Virginia’s House of Burgesses passed powerful (if ambiguous) resolutions. These inspired more resolutions from other assemblies and from a congress of nine colonies that assembled in New York. Mary land pamphleteer Daniel Dulany demolished the British argument that the colonies were “virtually” represented in Parliament. Henceforth the British assertion would be simply that Parliament could do what it chose. Separate but coordinated nonimportation campaigns in the ports frustrated the Townshend Acts between 1768 and 1770, not completely but enough to bring repeal of all but the tax on tea.
Parallel to the tax problem, the issue of British soldiers became an irritant. Only New York had a longstanding garrison, and it was small until the Seven Years’ War. When peace returned, the garrison remained so large that two separate barrack areas were needed to house the troops. Their off-duty competition for scarce jobs made them immensely unpopular, which also applied to the four-regiment garrison posted to Boston in 1768. Street brawls between soldiers seeking work and civilians broke out in New York in January 1770, and five Bostonians died when soldiers on guard duty at the customs house opened fire on a snowball-throwing crowd in Boston in March. Work was an issue there also, but Boston’s bloodshed began when a customs informer fired into a hostile crowd, killing eleven-year-old Christopher Seider. Calm returned after the “Boston Massacre,” but in 1772 Rhode Islanders captured and burned the revenue cutter Gaspée when it ran aground.

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Cultural Insurrections:essays on Western Civilization, Jewish Influence, & Anti-semitism

Cultural Insurrections:essays on Western Civilization, Jewish Influence, & Anti-semitism

Jewish intellectual and political movements are a powerful force in Western societies. Marxism, Zionism, neoconservatism, psychoanalysis, and multiculturalism have trans-formed Western self-consciousness, shattered ancient political orders through wars and revolutions, and promoted the ongoing demographic dispossession of European peoples by Third World immigrants. The Jewish role in these movements is often the subject of fierce partisanship, on all sides, but is seldom the subject of careful and dispassionate scientific analysis.

Kevin MacDonald has pioneered the evolutionary analysis of Jewish religious, intellectual, and political movements as strategies for achieving collective survival, advancement, and influence in his trilogy A People That Shall Dwell Alone: Judaism as a Group Evolutionary Strategy (1994), Separation and Its Discontents: Toward an Evolutionary Theory of Anti-Semitism (1998), and The Culture of Critique: An Evolutionary Analysis of Jewish Involvement in Twentieth-Century Intellectual and Political Movements (1998).
In the present volume, MacDonald extends and refines his analysis in chapters on Zionism and the Jewish role in Soviet Communism, neoconservatism, and the promotion of racial integration. MacDonald also devotes chapters to the anti-Semitism of Henry Ford, the psychological basis of ethnocentrism, the unique characteristics of Western civilization, and what Jewish group evolutionary strategies can contribute to its survival. MacDonald’s essays are not only models of scientific rigor, broad research, and deep insight, but of courage, candor, and clarity.

This edition is hardcover.

List Price: $ 40.00

Price: $ 40.00