John H. Shields

John H. Shields
Virginia Western
Image by jajacks62
Cobb’s Legion Infantry Battalion, C. S. A.
The Wichita Beacon, Friday, Nov. 10, 1916, Pg1 & 8
Died: Nov. 9, 1916

CAPTAIN JOHN H. SHIELDS
_____

The death of Captain Shields yesterday brought genuine sorrow to Wichita. During all the years he has been in Wichita no man has had honest cause to speak ill of him. He came here soon after the Civil War, a brave hearted Southern gentleman, a soldier of the Lost Cause, but he was never an exile, even at that hour when sectional lines had been emphasized by four years of warfare.
And he never truckled to the majority; he never struck his flag except to government. He had fought and lost; he saluted victory with dignity and went to running a Democratic newspaper in the heart of the abolition movement.
He was always kindly, courteous, helpful. He fought on the moral side of every issue—and the entire community expressed gratification at the later successes of his life. He leaves a useful memory in a community that grew to love him.

CAPT. J. H. SHIELDS
HAS PASSED AWAY
______
Death Came to Him Late
Thursday Afternoon.
______
During the Past Year He
Had Been Failing—Was
Wichita’s Postmaster.
______

Captain John H. Shields, who has been postmaster of this city since June 26, 1913, died at his home on Water and Orme Streets a little after 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon at the age of 72.
His physician, who had been passing a quarter of an hour before, dropped in, examined his heart, and found it in excellent condition. The captain was about to take an automobile ride for the fresh air when his head dropped and he was dead. Heart failure was the immediate cause of death.
For a year or more Captain Shields had been failing rapidly in health. His friends mentioned it to one another that he was not long for this world, but he did not realize it himself. He kept at his work all thru the hot weather. Some two months ago his limbs began to fail him and eventually became almost entirely paralyzed.
An Outing Every Day.
He was taken out in a wheel chair every day and during the last three or four weeks suffered great emaciation of body. His indomitable spirit, however, sustained him, and he never for a moment felt that he could not resume his duties in the postoffice.
Tuesday he said he wanted to go to his polling precinct to vote for President Wilson and reluctantly abandoned his purpose in deference to the counsel of his family.
This is the third time within the last three years that death has invaded the Shields cottage, the home of the family for twenty-four years. His wife, who had been a invalid for several years, was the first to depart. Then one of his daughters was taken from him and now he is gone. Some seven or eight years ago his son, Robert Prather Shields, who was getting a fine start in the world, died at St. Joseph, Mo. All of these sorrows had a considerable effect upon the health of Captain Shields, for altho he had a strong spirit, his closer friends knew that he grieved greatly in secret.
A Native of Georgia.
Captain Shields was not a Kentuckian as many people supposed. He was a native son of Georgia and came from an Irish stock that settled in that section before the Revolutionary War. He was born near Madison and while a sister of his still lived a few years ago he made a visit to the old homestead and had a delightful sojourn there. He was born in 1844 and became a printer—and a good one—early in life.
At the age of 17 he joined Cobb’s legion of the Confederate Army and served thruout the war where the fighting was thickest. He saw all the privations of army life, as the cause was losing and the soldiers were hungry and ragged most of the time, but he had a stout heart and never lost confidence in ultimate victory until his prime hero, General Robert E. Lee, offered his sword to Grant at Appomatox Court House in April, 1865. He participated in the battles of Stone River, Malvern Hill, Chancellorsville, Spottsylvania, Knoxville, Chickamaugua and Gettysburg.
General Gordon His Guest.
When General Gordon, the famous Confederate chieftain, came to Wichita sixteen or seventeen years ago, Captain Shields had him as a guest and it was good to hear them going over war times together.
When Captain Shields came to Wichita 31 years ago the story gained currency here that a romance, in the South led him into a duel in which he killed his opponent. The rumor exaggerated the facts. The truth was that he had sent a challenge to another Confederate soldier but the latter apologized and the duel was never fought.
After the war Captain Shields was married to Miss Sarah J. Butts in Morgan County, Georgia, and to them nine children were born, four of whom survive—Mrs. J. Wommack, of Braman, Ok.; Mrs. Sally Bevis and Ernest Shields of this city and Mrs. W. B. Alexander.
He Was a Publisher.
For nearly twenty years he published a daily paper at Paduchah, Ky., and came to Wichita in 1885 as a compositor for the Eagle. A year later Col. M. M. Murdock took him into the front office as assistant editor and he remained there until the early ninethies when Victor Murdock returned from Chicago and permanently entered upon the position of managing editor. Then the Captain took the telegraph desk and continued there until he started the Democrat, a weekly paper which he sold to Major Warren shortly after taking the position of postmaster here.
Ever since he came to Wichita his office, wherever it happened to be was the headquarters and mecca for Confederate soldiers and none of them in distress ever came to him in vain. He would share the last crust with a man who fought under the stars and bars. And while that was true, he was always popular among the Union soldiers. He was one of the leaders in the organization of a Confederate post here and thru his popularity with the Union veterans both groups have always fraternized.
A Town Named for Him.
The town of Shields in Western Kansas was named by the Missouri Pacific construction company in his honor when it was organized thirty years ago.
When the fires of Democracy burned low in Wichita, Captain Shields kept them aglow. He was not a demonstrative Democrat, but he was very loyal and it was because of that loyalty that Senator Thompson secured the postoffice for him three and one-half years ago. He was then 68 years of age and never had held a public office.
The Captain was genial in his disposition, very polite and courteous and was often referred to as a type of the old Southern gentleman. He was a very strong Baptist and was a constant attendant at that church. He was one of the early members of Wichita Lodge No. 22, A. O. U. W. and served as his Master Workman for a term. He had a wonderful affection for his invalid wife and nursed her fondly thru her long years of illness.
Funeral Service Saturday.
The funeral of Captain Shields will be held Saturday at 3:30 o’clock at the First Baptist Church. Rev. Guy L. Brown, pastor of the church, will preach the funeral sermon. Postoffice men and women will escort the body from the home to the church and employees from the postoffice will be pall bearers.
The body will be in state at the residence from 10 until 12 o’clock Saturday. The casket will not be opened at the church. Burial will be in Highland Cemetery. I. W. Gill in charge.

Pages 889-890 from volume III, part 2 of Kansas: a cyclopedia of state history, embracing events, institutions, industries, counties, cities, towns, prominent persons, etc. … / with a supplementary volume devoted to selected personal history and reminiscence. Standard Pub. Co. Chicago : 1912. 3 v. in 4. : front., ill., ports.; 28 cm. Vols. I-II edited by Frank W. Blackmar. Transcribed December 2002 by Carolyn Ward. This volume is identified at the Kansas State Historical Society as microfilm LM195. It is a two-part volume 3.

John H. Shields, of Wichita, editor and publisher of the "Wichita Democrat," has been engaged in newspaper work over forty years, twenty-six years of which time has been spent in the city of Wichita. Though there has been an evolution in journalism, as in every other profession, and the days of Franklin, Horace Greeley and other such moulders of public opinion have passed, there are yet many conscientious men devoting their lives to the art preservative, who unswervingly support truth, as they see it, and with a full sense of the power at their command, also recognize their responsibility for good or evil in shaping public opinion. Mr. Shields, as the name of his paper indicates, is a Democrat and an ardent supporter of his party in political affairs, but the strength of his influence is always given toward law enforcement, irrespective of party, and he is a stanch supporter of every movement that has for its aim the advancement of the material, moral and social interests of the city of Wichita, his state and his nation.
Mr. Shields was born in Morgan county, Georgia, June 8, 1844, a son of John B. and Eliza, A. Shields. Both parents were natives of Guilford county, North Carolina, and both died in the city of Madison, Ga., the father’s death having occurred in 1880, at the age of seventy-two, and the mother’s in 1872, when sixty years of age. Both were devout Christians and were members of the Baptist church, in which denomination the father officiated as a deacon. The original ancestors of this branch of the Shields family in America came from Scotland and from Ireland about 1770, and settled in North Carolina, near the Virginia line. The paternal grandparents of Mr. Shields moved from North Carolina to Georgia in 1818.
John H. Shields was reared in Morgan county, Georgia, and was educated in the English branches at Madison Male Seminary, Madison, Ga. He was still a youth when the Civil war opened, but enlisted in the defense of the Southland at the very beginning of the conflict, and served four years in the army of northern Virginia, under Gen. Robert E. Lee. At the close of the war, or in June, 1865, Mr. Shields began his business career by engaging in merchandising in Madison, Ga. He continued in business there until January, 1868, when he moved to Paducah, Ky., and there became associated with Col. John S. Prather and John Martin, Jr., in publishing the "Daily Kentuckian." On June 29, 1885, he came to Wichita, Kan., where he was employed as assistant editor of the "Wichita Eagle," from 1885 to 1897. On Jan. 7, 1899, he became editor and publisher of "The Democrat," at Wichita, in which connection he has continued to the present time (1911). Under his able management "The Democrat" has become recognized as one of Wichita’s leading weekly papers.
In Morgan county, Georgia, on Jan. 2, 1867, Mr. Shields married Sarah J. Butts, a daughter of Jacob Butts, of that county. Nine children have been the issue of that marriage, five of whom are still living: Mrs. Ula C. Wommack, of Braman, Okla.; Mrs. Sallie M. Bevis, of Wichita, Kan.; Miss Mae, who resides with her parents in Wichita; Mrs. Hattie B. Moore, and Ernest J., both of whom reside in Wichita. Fraternally Mr. Shields affiliates with two beneficiary societies, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the Fraternal Aid Association. In church faith and membership he is a Baptist.

WildcatWorld.com – In My Own Words: John Calipari, Part 3

Follow me on twitter: twitter.com Part 3 of 5 of a 60-minute interview special spotlighting the University of Kentucky mens basketball coach, one of the all-time winningest coaches in NCAA basketball history. In My Own Words: John Calipari chronicles Caliparis upbringing in western Pennsylvania and West Virginia and his early introduction to coaching, when as a high school student he coached grade school teams to gain a better understanding of the game. In the FOX Sports South original program, which is interspersed with footage of Calipari on the practice court and fans camped outside of Memorial Coliseum for tickets to Big Blue Madness, Calipari talks about the coaching journey that brought him to the hallowed basketball grounds of the University of Kentucky and the legacy he hopes to leave not only with the Wildcats program but also with the game of basketball.

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – foot – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – foot – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Closeup of the foot of the bas-relief top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – looking west – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – looking west – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking west at the bas-relief top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – upper detail – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – upper detail – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Closeup of the bas-relief top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking slightly northwest at the top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

John Denver’s song whose lyrics say west Virginia, is he talking about WestVa or Western Va?

Question by mulderlx: John Denver’s song whose lyrics say west Virginia, is he talking about WestVa or Western Va?
I heard this as a bit of trivia, but is this bit of trivia also a myth?

Best answer:

Answer by MixedMetaphor
West Virginia

“Almost heaven, West Virginia,
Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah River.
Life is old there, older than the trees,
Younger than the mountains, blowing like a breeze.”

Those are the country roads that he wanted to take him home. Not the ones we have in Virginia.

Denver didn’t write this song, in fact, when he recorded it he had never even been to West Virginia. Two musicians, Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert, wrote it while driving to Maryland — they’d never been to West Virginia either! Danoff got his inspiration from postcards sent to him by a friend who DID live there.

Give your answer to this question below!

John A. Magill

John A. Magill
Virginia Homes For Sale
Image by jajacks62
Co. K, 11th IND. Cavalry
The Chanute Daily Tribune, Thursday, June 7, 1917
Died: June 1917

J. A. MAGILL, WILSON
COUNTY PIONEER, DEAD
______
He Settled Near Roper in 1869 and
Organized Church There.
______

John A. Magill, who settled in Wilson county forty-seven years ago, died recently in Roper. Mr. Magill was the oldest of a family of nine children. His parents were Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus Magill. He was born in Clinton county, Indiana, June 12, 1831, and was of old revolutionary stock; his grandfather, John Magill of Virginia, being an officer in the army of independence.
He grew to manhood on his father’s farm in Indiana and married Margaret Magill on April 8, 1859. To this union four children were born, Clarence O. of Butte, Mont.; Lena, who married Peter Planey and who died in Buffalo twenty-two years ago; Annie Sale, who lives on the old home place, and Elmer S. of Roper, with whom his father made his home since the death of his wife five years ago.
During the Civil war he served in Company K, Eleventh Indiana cavalry, under Colonel Stewart.
Mr. and Mrs. Magill came to Kansas in 1866 and settled near Ottawa, where he worked as a carpenter. After three years they came to Wilson county and settled one and one-half miles northeast of Roper in Clifton township, taking a claim which he in due time preempted, and where they lived until 1906, when they moved to Roper. The death of Mr. Magill marks the passing of another one of those early pioneers who came to the unconquered West in the old days of young manhood and under untold hardships and privations built the foundation of their future home.
He was always ready to assist his more unfortunate neighbor and was a real friend to everyone. He will be missed by all who knew him.
Mr. Magill was a good Christian, being baptized in infancy, and has been a faithful member of the Methodist church and was the only surviving charter member of the class organized at the Banner schoolhouse in 1870. The church at Roper is the development of that class.
He had been a sufferer from rheumatism for the past year but always bore his sufferings patiently and met everyone with a smile.
He was a loving father and kind friend to everyone. Besides his three children he leaves five grandchildren and one great-grandchild, one brother, one sister and a host of friends to mourn his death.
The funeral services were held at the Roper church by the Rev. J. H. Noltensmyer of Benedict, assisted by J. R. Blackburn of Fredonia. Interment was in Maple Grove cemetery. A large congregation came to pay their last respects to a kind friend and neighbor.

John M. Watson

John M. Watson
Virginia Homes For Sale
Image by jajacks62
Company D, 62nd Pennsylvaina Infatnry
Page 404 and 405 of: Portrait and biographical album of Marshall County, Kansas: containing full page portraits and biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens of the county, together with portraits and biographies of all the governors of the state, and of the Presidents of the United States, Chapman Bros., 1889.
JOHN M. WATSON is not only one of the representative citizens of Marshall County, but one of the leading and successful business men of Frankfort, and an account of his career from his childhood to the present time finds an appropriate place in a work of this character. His father, Thomas Watson, was the son of Irish parents, while his mother traced her ancestry to the sturdy Scotch. The father was for many years a boat builder and carpenter, at Saltsburg, in the Conemaugh Valley, where he built boats for use on the Pennsylvania canal. He afterward engaged in farming near Elder’s Ridge, Pa., where he remained until 1870, when he removed to Saltsburg where he resided until his death, which took place in June 1888 he having reached the advanced age of eighty-eight. Our subject is the eldest of a family which embraced five boys and three girls. Thomas C., who is a farmer, lives on the old home place at Elder’s Ridge with his wife. Mary J. is the wife of Rev. A. T. Bell, a Presbyterian minister at Home, Indiana Co., Pa., they have one child, a girl of seventeen years. M. H. is a banker in Greenville, Mercer Co., Pa., is married and has two sons. Martha married G. P. McCartney, who operates the gas works, a paper mill and a tannery in Indiana, Pa. Emma resides in Camden, N. J., she is the wife of George W. Creighton, a civil engineer, and Division Superintendent on the Pennsylvania Central Railroad. William died in August, 1863, at the age of nine years. James P. is single and resides on the old home place.
Our subject, like the great majority of the successful citizens of Kansas, was reared upon a farm and early became acquainted with farm work. His early education was received in the common schools, and was supplemented by an academic course at Elder’s Ridge Academy. Shortly after the breaking out of the war, Mr. Watson enlisted as a private in Company D, 62d Pennsylvania Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the Army of the Potomac, and during the next three years participated in the campaigns against Richmond, and against Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. Among the more important engagements in which our subject took part may be mentioned Yorktown, Gaines Mills, Malvern Hill, second battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancelorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, North Ann River, Cold Harbor and Petersburg. Although present with his regiment in the above battles, as well as a number of sharp skirmishes, Mr. Watson had the good fortune to escape unhurt. A number of bullet holes received in his clothing at various times, however, bore eloquent testimony to uncomfortably close calls. The three years for Mr. Watson enlisted, expired on the 4th of July 1864, and he was soon after honorably discharged from the service. He returned to Pennsylvania and attended Elder’s Ridge College until the spring of 1865, when he was attacked by the Western fever and came to this county. He purchased 320 acres of land in Wels Township, about five miles west of Frankfort. Shortly after he filed on the adjoining 160 acres under the homestead act. He has since purchased an additional eighty, making his present estate consist of 560 acres, all improved and under cultivation. From the year he arrived in Kansas until 1870 Mr. Watson followed farming. In that year he was elected Register of Deeds of Marshall County, an office which he filled for two years. At the expiration of his term he returned to his farm, on which he remained until 1880. In that year he came to Frankfort, and engaged in the business of buying, shipping and selling live-stock. He continued in this business about three years, when he went into the lumber business, becoming the junior member of the firm of Brown & Watson. In 1888 he bought out his partner, and has since been running the business alone. He now owns the principal lumber yard in Frankfort, and his annual sales aggregate a large amount. His farm, which he rented, also yields him a satisfactory annual income.
On Feb. 4, 1872, our subject was married to Miss Emma McDougal, a native of Missouri. Her parents died when she was a little girl, and she made her home with her sister, Mrs. May Marshall, in Maysville, which city had been named after her. Mrs. Marshall now resides in Denver. Miss McDougal was educated at the convent schools of St. Marys, in Pottawatomie County, Kan., and of St. Joseph, Mo., and is a cultured, refined and accomplished lady. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Watson—Frank W., Thomas H, Ida, and Wiley H., all of whom are living except Ida, who died at the age of seven years.
Mr. Watson is a member of Frankfort Lodge No. 67, A. F. & A. M., and has been Secretary of his Lodge for a number of years. He is also a member of Henderson Post No. 53, G. A. R., and is the Post Quartermaster. For the past seven years he has been a member and Treasurer of the Frankfort School Board. In politics he is a staunch Republican, and has been prominent in the councils and active in the work of his party. He has served repeatedly as a delegate to County, Judicial, Congressional, and State conventions, and as a member of the County, Judicial and Congressional Central committees. It will thus be seen that Mr. Watson is not only an active and energetic business man, but a prominent and popular citizen. During his residence in Frankfort he has engaged heartily and earnestly in every enterprise having for its object the prosperity and welfare of the city.
Mr. Watson is a man of medium stature and build; his black hair and beard are very lightly sprinkled with gray. His eyes and complexion are dark. In business Mr. Watson brings judgment and prudence to bear, and his decisions are based upon mature and deliberate judgment. His success as a farmer is attributable to the fact that he carried business methods and principles into the management of his farm. In the conduct of his present business he has earned a reputation for honest and honorable dealings, which insures him the respect of all who know him. He is a man of uniform courtesy, genial and companionable.

John Walter Scott

John Walter Scott
Virginia Union University
Image by jajacks62
Surgeon 4th KS. Infantry & Surgeon 10th KS. Infantry
History of Allen and Woodson Counties, Kansas: embellished with portraits of well known people of these counties, with biographies of our representative citizens, cuts of public buildings and a map of each county / Edited and Compiled by L. Wallace Duncan and Chas. F. Scott. Iola Registers, Printers and Binders, Iola, Kan.: 1901

JOHN WALTER SCOTT was born near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 29, 1825. His father was Alexander McRay Scott, who was born at Alexandria, Virginia, August 19, 1800. His mother was Mary Dean, who was born in New Jersey or Pennsylvania in 1799. His paternal grandfather was John Scott, who’migrated from Belfast, Ireland, soon after the Revolution, landing first at St. Thomas, West Indies, but soon after going to Norfolk, Virginia, and thence to Alexandria. His paternal grandmother was Margaret Kenna, the daughter of an English sea captain. Nothing farther is known of the paternal line, except that "in the beginning" one "John," a ship joiner, migrated from Scotland to the ship yards at Belfast, Ireland, and was there called "John, the Scot," to differentiate him from other Johns, which name, of course, soon became John Scott, which it still remains. The John Scott who migrated to America was a shoemaker by trade. He was killed by lightning when about sixty years of age. His wife died in Indiana about 1853, of old age. Alexander Scott, the father of our subject, was a machinist and mechanic, although he always lived on a farm. He died at the age of sixty-four in Bloomington, Illinois, of cerebro spinal meningitis. His wife has previously passed away in Kentucky at the age of forty-four, of malarial fever. John W. Scott’s maternal grandfather was Samuel Dean, a Revolutionary soldier in the New Jersey line. He afterwards served under "Mad Anthony" Wayne in the Indian wars and was severely wounded in the hip, making him lame the remainder of his life. He was probably of Danish descent and was a farmer. He died at the age of eighty-six from the effect of his wounds. Nothing more is known of the family on this side.
John W. Scott was the oldest child of Alexander and Mary Dean Scott. He had three brothers, Samuel, William and Harmon, and five sisters, Martha, Mary, Jennie, Margaret and Hannah. Of this family only Margaret and Jennie now survive.
When John W. Scott was three years of age his father bought a farm adjoining the Braddock Field property, near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and there nio.st of his childhood was spent. He worked on the farm in summer and in the winter attended such schools as the uncertain condition of the country afforded, in this way acquiring the rudiments of a fair English education.
In 1840 he went with his father to Gallatin county, Kentucky, where he worked on a farm and in a saw mill for three or four years. The work proved too heavy for him and his health giving way he secured a position as private tutor in the family of Dr. William B. Chamberlain, in Warsaw, Kentucky. He taught the children of his employer the rudiments of English and received from him in return a smattering of Greek, Latin and mathematics. He afterward taught school in various portions of the county during the winters and read medicine with Dr. Chamberlain.
In 1846-7 he took a course of medical lectures at the Starling Medical College, Columbus, Ohio, and in the spring of 1847 began the practice of his profession at Hopewell, Indiana. After practicing there for two years he took another course of lectures at the above college from which he graduated in the spring of 1849, returning at once to his practice in Indiana.
December 13, 1849, he was married to Maria Protsman, the neice of his former preceptor, Dr. Chamberlain, and continued in the practice of medicine at Hopewell and Franklin, Indiana, until 1857 when he came to Kansas. He bought an original interest in the townsite of Olathe, which had just been located, and in connection with one Charles Osgood, built the first house erected on the townsite. In the fall he returned to Indiana and the following spring brought his family to Olathe. Owing to the unsettled condition of the country and the scenes of violence that were continually occurring in the town Olathe was not then a desirable place of residence, and so in June of 1858 Dr. Scott removed with his family to Allen county and took up a claim near Carlyle where he lived for the next sixteen years.
ill! the fall of 1859 he was elected to the Territorial legislature whicli met at Lecompton and afterwards adjourned to Lawrence,—the first Free State legislature. He was re-elected in 1860 and was chosen Speaker of the House, In 1861 he was elected a member of the first State legislature, and in the absence of the Speaker presided during most of the session. During this session P’ort Sunipter was fired upon, and at its close most of its members entered the Union army. Dr. Scott enlisted in the Fourth Kansas Volunteer Infantry and was elected surgeon. He served with the Fourth during the fall and winter of 1861-2, being in charge of the general hospital
at Fort Scott. When the Third and Fourth regiments were consolidated and became the 10th Kansas he became the surgeon of that regiment and served until May, 1863, when he resigned on account of the long and serious illness of his wife. In the fall of the same year, his wife’s health having been restored, he re-entered and served to the end of the war, returjiing then to his Carlyle farm.
In 1866 he was elected to the State Senate, was elected president pro tem of that body and presided during the session on account of Lieutenant Governor Greene serving as Governor, vice Governor S.J. Crawford resigned. Although always interested in politics and often actively engaged in the contests as a member of conventions and as a speaker in the campaigns, and frequenth’ mentioned as an available candidate for Congress and other high positions, he was not again a candidate for any office during the remainder of his residence in Kansas.
Almost from his first location in the state Dr. Scott had interested himself actively in the various projects looking to the building of railroads into this section of the State. Among the numerous meetings and conventions held in the interest of these projects the most important was a convention held at Topeka in the year 1859. The purpose of this convention was to agree upon a system of railroads upon which the State would go to Congress, asking for land grants to aid in the building of the roads, and the chief contest was between the proposed line from Leavenworth south (now the Southern Kansas) and the proposed line then designated as the Border Tier road (now the Kansas City, Fort Scott and Memphis.) The committee appointed to draft outlines of the system of roads decided in favor of the Border Tier, leaving out the Leavenworth, Lawrence and Galveston, as it was then and for many years afterward called. As a dissenting member of this committee Dr. Scott made a minority report in favor of the L- L. and G. , and succeeded in carrying it through the convention, thus securing the grant of land which made possible the building of that road. When the company was organized he became one of the directors, and when the road was finally built, in 1869, he was appointed Land Commissioner. He remained in that capacity eight years, during which time he was the chief
agent in securing the railroad title to the land to which it was entitled and in disposing of the lands to settlers. During most of this time also he was a member of the State Board of Agriculture, taking an active and efficient part in organizing and conducting the State Fairs which were a feature of those early years. From 1873 to 1879 he served as Regent of the State University, helping ta lay the foundations of that great institution. Alter closing his connection with the railroad he returned to lola, thefamily having removed from the Carlyle farm to that place in 1874, and in 1876 engaged in the drug business, purchasing the stock of John Francis. In 1883, without solicitation on his part, he was appointed agent for the Ponca, Pawnee and Otoe Indians taking charge of the Agency January 1, 1884. He served in this position until October, 1885, when he resigned and returned to lola to resume the conduct of his drug business. He conducted this business until 1891, when he sold it to J. H. Campbell in order to accept an appointment as Inspector for the Bureau of Animal Industry. He was assigned to duty at Kansas City and served until 1893, when heresigned. Desiring to retire from active business he went with his wife and daughter Belle, then constituting his family, to Clifton, Oklahoma, to visit his oldest son, who had taken a claim there. The climate and country pleased him so well that when the Oklahoma school lands were thrown open he leased a quarter section and with the energy which always characterized him proceeded to improve it, as if he were in his youth instead of in his seventieth year. He lived there quietly and happily until the fall of 1898 when his neighbors, almost without lespect to party, although he was still an ardent Republican, as he had been since the organization of that party, insisted that he serve as their candidate for the Territorial legislature. He reluctantly consented, and was elected, although the district contained a largely adverse party majority. He was not in his usual health when the .session opened early in January, 1899, and in going to the Capitol he suffered some exposure which brought on an attack of pneumonia which resulted in his death, which occurred January 19, 1899. In honor of his memory the legislature adjourned and a committee of its members was appointed to accompany the remains to lola where they were interred. A further and most touching proof of the respect and affection in which he was held by his colleagues was given by the fact that during the entire remainder of the session his chair on the floor of the house remained draped, and every morning there was on his desk a bouquet of fresh flowers. And so he died as he had lived, honored and beloved by all who knew him, a man who loved his family with a rare devotion, who was an important and influential factor in the development of two new States, who served his
State and his country, in office and out of it, in peace and in war, with great ability and with incorruptible integrity, and who in all the relations of life was worthy of love and honor.
Maria Protsman, wife of John W. Scott, was born on a farm nine miles north of Vevay, Indiana, July 19, 1829. Her father, William Protsman, was born in Danville, Kentucky, February 5, 1801, and came to Indiana in 18 14 where he worked with his father at farming and wagon making.
He opened a large farm near Vevay and reared children as follows: Flora, Maria, Emarine, Isaac, Ellen, Adelia, Charles, Fannie, William, Alexander of whom Flora, Maria, Emarine, Charles, William and Alexander still survive. William Protsman died in 1866. His father was John Protsman, who emigrated from Germany with his father’s family about the year 1769. iln the family there were four brothers and two sisters. As a mere boy John Protsnian served as a teamster during the Revolutionary war. In 1792 he was married in Philadelpliia to Nancy B. Reckwor and soon aiterwards moved to Ohio, going from there to Kentucky and finally to Vevay,
Indiana, where he died at the age of seventy-eight. He was a carpenter and farmer. His children were David, Samuel, John, William, Nancy B.., and Elizabeth. Nancy Recknor, wife of John Protsman, was also of German descent, her father and mother emigrating from Germany a little
before the Revolutionary war. Her father was a soldier and was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill. Her mother died the year following at Philadelphia, and the two children, Nancy B, and John, were taken and reared by their grandmother. When they were grown John went to the South and
that was the last known of him. Polly Campbell Protsman, the mother of Maria Protsman Scott, was born in Kentucky April 9, 1809, and died at Vevay, Indiana, in 1890. Her father was William Campbell, who was born in South Carolina in August, 1776. Her mother, Polly Brown, was born in Kentucky, June 17, 1783, and was married to William Campbell June 17, 1800. William Campbell died February 4, 1832, leaving a family of nine children, as follows: Jeannette, Jemima, Elizabeth, Susan, Polly, Samuel, James, and William. Polly, his wife, died in 1868, at the age of eighty-five years.
The children of John W. and Maria P. Scott were: William Alexander, born September 29, 1S50; Walter Winfield, born September 4, 1853; Clara Belle, born September 14, 1855, Angelo Cyrus, born September 25, 1857; Charles Frederick, born September 7, i860; Emma Louisa, born April 23, 1865, died September 4, 1879; Susie Flora, born April 6, 1867, died September 1, 1873; Effie June (Mrs. E. C. Franklin) born August 4, 1871.