Anne Smith (left), Virginia Clean Marina Coordinator, tells students it takes 450 years for plastic bottles to decompose. ©Janet Krenn/VASG

Anne Smith (left), Virginia Clean Marina Coordinator, tells students it takes 450 years for plastic bottles to decompose. ©Janet Krenn/VASG
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Virginia Sea Grant
Did you know it takes longer for fishing wire to decompose than an aluminum can?

Can you name some of the fish that are part of Virginia’s Saltwater Game Fish Tagging Program?

These are just some of the things students who participated in 2011 Urbanna Oyster Festival Marine Science Legacy Day heard about at the VIMS booth, led by members of Virginia Sea Grant’s Marine Extension Program at VIMS. After talking to students about marine debris and the Game Fish Tagging Program, Anne Smith (Clean Marina Specialist) and Susanna Musick (Marine Recreation Specialist) led students in a fishing game. Students would use a rod and reel to pull in either a fish or a type of marine debris. Then they’d take their catch over to a table to look up information about it.

The Urbanna Oyster Festival Marine Science Legacy Day brings hundreds of elementary school students to Urbanna, VA to learn about science, conservation, and issues in the Chesapeake Bay.

For more information about Virginia Sea Grant and our educational activities, visit vaseagrant.vims.edu

VIMS David Rudders (right) talks with Virginia Sea Grant-funded research Donna Bilkovich (left) about her turtle mapping. ©Will Sweatt/VASG

VIMS David Rudders (right) talks with Virginia Sea Grant-funded research Donna Bilkovich (left) about her turtle mapping. ©Will Sweatt/VASG
Virginia Network
Image by Virginia Sea Grant
On Wednesday February 1, Virginia Sea Grant (VASG) held its 3rd annual Project Participants’ Symposium—a meeting that enables VASG partners to network and learn while helping to plan the future of VASG. About 100 researchers, students, and other partners gathered in Richmond for the Symposium, which was followed by the annual Seafood & Wine Reception. The Reception, cosponsored by VASG and the Virginia Seafood Council, drew more than 200 attendees, including VASG institutional partners, state legislators, and agency representatives.

Read more about the 2012 Symposium at bit.ly/2012vasgsym

Have you ever felt left out of the World Jewish Conspiracy?

Question by : Have you ever felt left out of the World Jewish Conspiracy?
I do, because I’m not Jewish, but I wonder if there are any Jews out there who feel that way. Personally, I feel really left out of the Ivy League good old boy network AND the West Virginia good old boy network. I mean, my great grandfather was a sheriff’s deputy and shot at miners during the Blair Mountain Mine War. I should get something out of that, right?

Best answer:

Answer by A. Banana
Um… What?

Give your answer to this question below!

door, kitchen – bottom of overhang=largest green area left – (Home Depot color matching problems) – IMG_3690 (20111014)

door, kitchen – bottom of overhang=largest green area left – (Home Depot color matching problems) – IMG_3690 (20111014)
Virginia Insurance
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
Home Depot’s color-matching skills with Behr paint-with-prime vs Behr paint-without-prime leaves a lot to be desired. A LOT. Our color mis-matching here is what you get when you take the same paint back and ask them to match the existing paint. They, er, uh… don’t. No refunds! a gallon paint-with-primer, a gallon paint-without-primer, tons of brushes, paint thinner, rags, elbow grease — And you get this! Mis-matched color!

You can’t really see it very well in this picture, though, because the angle of the sun really messed the picture up. Mostly you can only see the mismatch on the outer door frame.

Home Depot color matching, birdfeeders, house maintenance, kitchen door, mismatched paint.

back yard, Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

October 14, 2011.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL.wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL.wordpress.com

BACKSTORY: While dealing with Farmers insurance & Progressive/Homesite insurance’s dropping our policy for us having peeling window sill paint (among other things), we had to do a bunch of house repairs. While painting our window sills, we also painted other surfaces that needed painting, such as doors, railings, soffits, stairs, gutters, pipes, and cinder block walls.

Left Side of “Family Man” Case from the Will Jenkins Exhibit

Left Side of “Family Man” Case from the Will Jenkins Exhibit
Virginia Insurance
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is the left-hand side of Case 1 for an exhibit on Virginia Author Will Jenkins, whose pen name was Murray Leinster, on display in the Read and Relax area on the first floor of Swem Library. The exhibit was created to celebrate the Virginia General Assembly designating June 27, 2009 as Will Jenkins Day in Virginia.

Case 1 is entitled "Family Man" and includes photos, clippings, and books documenting Jenkins and his family.

The following is from the main label text for this case:

FAMILY MAN

William Fitzgerald Jenkins (who wrote many of his stories under the name Murray Leinster) was born in Norfolk, Virginia, on June 16, 1896, and died at the Francis N. Sanders Nursing Home in Gloucester on June 8, 1975. Although he lived elsewhere during his long career, he maintained his Virginia roots and kept a summer home in Gloucester, where he did much of his writing.

As an adolescent, he began selling stories to the Smart Set and other popular magazines, and at twenty-one was able to resign his position as a bookkeeper at Prudential Insurance in Newark, New Jersey to become a full-time writer.
In 1921 Will Jenkins married the former Mary Mandola; the couple subsequently had four daughters, one of whom lives with her husband at the Jenkins home in Gloucester. Mr. Jenkins served in both world wars: with the Committee of Public Information and the US Army in World War I, and with the Office of War Information in World War II.

The author’s formal education ended after the eighth grade, but his love of science– fueled by the success of contemporaries Thomas Edison and the Wright Brothers– served him well throughout his life. He loved to invent things and write about scanners, deflectors, coders and other forms of “advanced technology.” (His 1946 story ”A Logic Named Joe” predicts the existence of networked home computers, the ability to find information online, and the inherent problems of censorship, scams, and the invasion of privacy.) Mr. Jenkins was awarded two patents on the front-projection filming method in 1955, a technique first used in the film 2001: A Space Odyssey.

In his last interview in 1972, Will Jenkins remarked that he felt a kinship with Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek stories, that they were “his kind” of science fiction. *
Even though Will Jenkins cannot claim the Star Trek stories, according to his daughter Betty DeHardit, royalty checks are still coming in.
Ronald Payne, The Last Murray Leinster Interview (Richmond: Waves Press, 1982), 11.

The following is from a label in this case about how Will Jenkins became Murray Leinster"

“I know a man who writes very well….But he doesn’t sell—because he’d rather feel like a neglected genius than a well-nourished one."
Very early in his career, Mr. Jenkins was introduced to H. L. Mencken and George Jean Nathan, the editors of the very popular magazine Smart Set. They advised him to adopt a pen name when writing for pulp-fiction magazines in order to preserve his reputation. Murray Leinster was born. Mr. Jenkins also wrote as Louisa Carter Lee and William Fitzgerald. Later on the author reintroduced his real name, shortened to Will F. Jenkins, for more “respectable” publications, such as Collier’s, Good Housekeeping, and the Saturday Evening Post, but he never published science fiction under his own name.
* Will F. Jenkins, “What Do You Mean—Success in Writing?” Author & Journalist 22, no.5 (1937): 9.

Aerial of Williamson, West Virginia, Showing the Coal Rail Yards and the River That Divides Kentucky at the Upper Left and West Virginia. The Town Has the Largest Coal Train Yard in the World, Followed by Danville, West Virginia 04/1974

Aerial of Williamson, West Virginia, Showing the Coal Rail Yards and the River That Divides Kentucky at the Upper Left and West Virginia. The Town Has the Largest Coal Train Yard in the World, Followed by Danville, West Virginia 04/1974
Virginia Western
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Aerial of Williamson, West Virginia, Showing the Coal Rail Yards and the River That Divides Kentucky at the Upper Left and West Virginia. The Town Has the Largest Coal Train Yard in the World, Followed by Danville, West Virginia 04/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-14012

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
West Virginia (United States) state
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: http://arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556464

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Buy copies of selected National Archives photographs and documents at the National Archives Print Shop online: gallery.pictopia.com/natf/photo/

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Lee’s Endangered Left: The Civil War In Western Virginia, Spring Of 1864

Lee’s Endangered Left: The Civil War In Western Virginia, Spring Of 1864

In the spring of 1864, Ulysses S. Grant as general-in-chief of the Union armies devised a plan of concerted action to bring down the Confederacy. As part of that strategy, Grant aimed to destroy General Robert E. Lee’s supply source for his Army of Northern Virginia in western Virginia and to use military activity there as an extended turning movement to threaten Lee from the west. In this outstanding study, Richard R. Duncan offers a riveting overview of these military operations we well as their impact on the civilian population, shedding light on an often overlooked chapter of the Civil War in Virginia.

List Price: $ 24.95

Price: $ 17.50

Training the Left Hook 1

One of the methods I’ve had success with for training the left jab/right cross/left hook boxing combination — and for training the left hook specifically — is to have the student hold their right glove to the focus mitt and freeze for a moment before firing off the left hook. The idea is to have the student think about their footwork, weight distribution, and hand position before they whirl around with the left hook. Too often I’ve seen students develop extremely bad form in the left jab/right cross/left hook combination because they go too quickly and rush the motion. You should slow everything down and work on speed and power later. First must come proper form, which means proper body mechanics.