What is the life of a Navy Intelligence Officer like?

Question by Braden: What is the life of a Navy Intelligence Officer like?
How often are you on land compared to sea? What is a more interesting job, Navy Intelligence or Navy Cryptology?

Best answer:

Answer by Michael Antoldi
classified data may be collected from satellite images, Internet chatter, and military and spy reports. Imagine coding and decoding classified information, maintaining Combat Information Center displays or even operating an Identification Friend or Foe system on a ship. When it comes to communications networks, you’ll be working within one of the largest and most important networks on the globe.

Specific Responsibilities
Both Enlisted Sailors and Officers working in Navy Intelligence handle classified documents and transform raw data into vital intelligence. If you are able to meet all security clearance requirements, then you’re on a path to take on the responsibility of handling high-tech classified information.

As part of this occupational specialty, you may:

Track targets
Operate underwater communications equipment
Defend ships against inbound threats including antiship missiles
Analyze intelligence
Maintain Combat Information Center (CIC) displays
Operate and maintain global satellite telecommunications systems
Work with classified material
Provide technical support to deployed units
Operate electronic radio receivers
Operate state-of-the-art computer equipment
Work Environment
As an Enlisted Sailor or Officer working in the field of Navy Intelligence, you will have opportunities to serve in a variety of sea and shore assignments worldwide. Your typical assignments could place you with an aviation squadron or air wing staff or aboard an aircraft carrier or amphibious command ship.

Training & Advancement
Those pursuing Officer positions in the intelligence field are required to attend Officer Candidate School (OCS) in Newport, Rhode Island. Upon completion, they must attend a five-month basic course of instruction at the Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center at Dam Neck, Virginia. There, they receive training in electronic, anti-submarine, antisurface, antiair, amphibious, and strike warfare; counterintelligence; strategic intelligence; air defense analysis; and combat mission planning.

After graduating from basic intelligence training, graduates then go on a 30-month operational fleet tour. Typically, these on-the-job training assignments allow them to lead Sailors and supervise the collection, analysis and dissemination of intelligence critical to their command’s mission.

After the Navy
From learning highly technical database design and computer networking to decoding classified information, your training will be extensive. With these skills, you will be more than equipped for countless jobs in the high-tech industry.

Your training may also prepare you for the following civilian careers:

Intelligence Specialist
Cryptographic Machine Operator
Photographic Interpreter
Computer Programmer
Data Communications Analyst
Electronic Intelligence Operations Specialist
Computer Systems Hardware Analyst
Air Traffic Controller

Give your answer to this question below!

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image of Case 2 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this section of the case:

Pro-Segregation:

The materials in this section represent a tiny fraction of the thousands of pro-segregation letters and documents in Swem’s collections. Those who favored segregation gave a variety of reasons, but the most emotional was a fear that integration of schools would lead to race mixing, including interracial marriages. U.S. Senator A. Willis Robertson, a Democrat and crony of Harry Byrd’s, received letters from all over the state. He is pictured here speaking at William & Mary’s commencement in 1957, when the College awarded him an honorary degree. State Senator (and later Governor) Mills Godwin, Jr. (W&M ’34), also pictured here, was a Democrat who served on the Gray Commission and received letters primarily from his Southside constituents. U.S. Representative William Tuck (W&M ’17), another Democrat, received letters not just from his Southside district but also from across the state, because he was a former governor and one of the leading segregationists in Virginia. He helped found the extremely pro-segregation Defenders of State Sovereignty and Individual Liberties. His correspondents included extremists who advocated removal of the black population to Africa and the assassination of the president, vice president, and the entire Supreme Court.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image of Case 2 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this section of the case:

Pro-Segregation:

The materials in this section represent a tiny fraction of the thousands of pro-segregation letters and documents in Swem’s collections. Those who favored segregation gave a variety of reasons, but the most emotional was a fear that integration of schools would lead to race mixing, including interracial marriages. U.S. Senator A. Willis Robertson, a Democrat and crony of Harry Byrd’s, received letters from all over the state. He is pictured here speaking at William & Mary’s commencement in 1957, when the College awarded him an honorary degree. State Senator (and later Governor) Mills Godwin, Jr. (W&M ’34), also pictured here, was a Democrat who served on the Gray Commission and received letters primarily from his Southside constituents. U.S. Representative William Tuck (W&M ’17), another Democrat, received letters not just from his Southside district but also from across the state, because he was a former governor and one of the leading segregationists in Virginia. He helped found the extremely pro-segregation Defenders of State Sovereignty and Individual Liberties. His correspondents included extremists who advocated removal of the black population to Africa and the assassination of the president, vice president, and the entire Supreme Court.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image of Case 2 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this section of the case:

Pro-Integration:

This section includes many of the letters and resolutions in Swem’s collections from Virginians who favored the Brown decision. African Americans strongly supported the Supreme Court. NAACP chapters, ministers, and the Virginia Teachers
Association, which represented teachers of color, advocated for integration. The NAACP pin belonged to one of the Ragsdale sisters, pictured here, whose sister Mabel was assistant principal at Farmville’s Moton High School. Among whites, support tended to be strongest among ministers and religious groups such as the Friends and the Mennonites and also among people who lived in areas such as southwestern and northern Virginia, where the black populations were smallest. The Virginia Council of Human Relations was an interracial group that supported integration in schools and other public facilities.

Few of the supporters of the Brown decision bothered to write to the white political leaders whose papers Swem Library owns. The likeliest white politician in Swem’s collections to receive pro-Brown letters was State Senator Ted Dalton (W&M ’24), a Republican who represented southwestern Virginia. He favored segregation but opposed closing schools, putting him at odds with the architect of massive
resistance, Harry Byrd, with whom he is pictured in the other case.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image of Case 2 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this section of the case:

Pro-Integration:

This section includes many of the letters and resolutions in Swem’s collections from Virginians who favored the Brown decision. African Americans strongly supported the Supreme Court. NAACP chapters, ministers, and the Virginia Teachers
Association, which represented teachers of color, advocated for integration. The NAACP pin belonged to one of the Ragsdale sisters, pictured here, whose sister Mabel was assistant principal at Farmville’s Moton High School. Among whites, support tended to be strongest among ministers and religious groups such as the Friends and the Mennonites and also among people who lived in areas such as southwestern and northern Virginia, where the black populations were smallest. The Virginia Council of Human Relations was an interracial group that supported integration in schools and other public facilities.

Few of the supporters of the Brown decision bothered to write to the white political leaders whose papers Swem Library owns. The likeliest white politician in Swem’s collections to receive pro-Brown letters was State Senator Ted Dalton (W&M ’24), a Republican who represented southwestern Virginia. He favored segregation but opposed closing schools, putting him at odds with the architect of massive
resistance, Harry Byrd, with whom he is pictured in the other case.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image of Case 2 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this section of the case:

Pro-Integration:

This section includes many of the letters and resolutions in Swem’s collections from Virginians who favored the Brown decision. African Americans strongly supported the Supreme Court. NAACP chapters, ministers, and the Virginia Teachers
Association, which represented teachers of color, advocated for integration. The NAACP pin belonged to one of the Ragsdale sisters, pictured here, whose sister Mabel was assistant principal at Farmville’s Moton High School. Among whites, support tended to be strongest among ministers and religious groups such as the Friends and the Mennonites and also among people who lived in areas such as southwestern and northern Virginia, where the black populations were smallest. The Virginia Council of Human Relations was an interracial group that supported integration in schools and other public facilities.

Few of the supporters of the Brown decision bothered to write to the white political leaders whose papers Swem Library owns. The likeliest white politician in Swem’s collections to receive pro-Brown letters was State Senator Ted Dalton (W&M ’24), a Republican who represented southwestern Virginia. He favored segregation but opposed closing schools, putting him at odds with the architect of massive
resistance, Harry Byrd, with whom he is pictured in the other case.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image of Case 2 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this case:

Pro-Integration:

This section includes many of the letters and resolutions in Swem’s collections from Virginians who favored the Brown decision. African Americans strongly supported the Supreme Court. NAACP chapters, ministers, and the Virginia Teachers Association, which represented teachers of color, advocated for integration. The NAACP pin belonged to one of the Ragsdale sisters, pictured here, whose sister Mabel was assistant principal at Farmville’s Moton High School. Among whites, support tended to be strongest among ministers and religious groups such as the Friends and the Mennonites and also among people who lived in areas such as southwestern and northern Virginia, where the black populations were smallest. The Virginia Council of Human Relations was an interracial group that supported integration in schools and other public facilities.

Few of the supporters of the Brown decision bothered to write to the white political leaders whose papers Swem Library owns. The likeliest white politician in Swem’s collections to receive pro-Brown letters was State Senator Ted Dalton (W&M ’24), a Republican who represented southwestern Virginia. He favored segregation but opposed closing schools, putting him at odds with the architect of massive resistance, Harry Byrd, with whom he is pictured in the other case.

Pro-Segregation:

The materials in this section represent a tiny fraction of the thousands of pro-segregation letters and documents in Swem’s collections. Those who favored segregation gave a variety of reasons, but the most emotional was a fear that integration of schools would lead to race mixing, including interracial marriages. U.S. Senator A. Willis Robertson, a Democrat and crony of Harry Byrd’s, received letters from all over the state. He is pictured here speaking at William & Mary’s commencement in 1957, when the College awarded him an honorary degree. State Senator (and later Governor) Mills Godwin, Jr. (W&M ’34), also pictured here, was a Democrat who served on the Gray Commission and received letters primarily from his Southside constituents. U.S. Representative William Tuck (W&M ’17), another Democrat, received letters not just from his Southside district but also from across the state, because he was a former governor and one of the leading segregationists in Virginia. He helped found the extremely pro-segregation Defenders of State Sovereignty and Individual Liberties. His correspondents included extremists who
advocated removal of the black population to Africa and the assassination of the president, vice president, and the entire Supreme Court.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit

Case 2 of “The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image of Case 2 from the exhibit "The Virginia Way of Life Must Be Preserved", on display in the Nancy Marshall Gallery on the 1st floor of Swem Library at the College of William & Mary. This exhibit is part of "From Fights to Rights: The Long Road to a More Perfect Union," Swem Library’s project to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Civil War and the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement. The exhibit is on display from June 18-October 22, 2012.

The following is a transcription of the labels presented in this case:

Pro-Integration:

This section includes many of the letters and resolutions in Swem’s collections from Virginians who favored the Brown decision. African Americans strongly supported the Supreme Court. NAACP chapters, ministers, and the Virginia Teachers Association, which represented teachers of color, advocated for integration. The NAACP pin belonged to one of the Ragsdale sisters, pictured here, whose sister Mabel was assistant principal at Farmville’s Moton High School. Among whites, support tended to be strongest among ministers and religious groups such as the Friends and the Mennonites and also among people who lived in areas such as southwestern and northern Virginia, where the black populations were smallest. The Virginia Council of Human Relations was an interracial group that supported integration in schools and other public facilities.

Few of the supporters of the Brown decision bothered to write to the white political leaders whose papers Swem Library owns. The likeliest white politician in Swem’s collections to receive pro-Brown letters was State Senator Ted Dalton (W&M ’24), a Republican who represented southwestern Virginia. He favored segregation but opposed closing schools, putting him at odds with the architect of massive resistance, Harry Byrd, with whom he is pictured in the other case.

Pro-Segregation:

The materials in this section represent a tiny fraction of the thousands of pro-segregation letters and documents in Swem’s collections. Those who favored segregation gave a variety of reasons, but the most emotional was a fear that integration of schools would lead to race mixing, including interracial marriages. U.S. Senator A. Willis Robertson, a Democrat and crony of Harry Byrd’s, received letters from all over the state. He is pictured here speaking at William & Mary’s commencement in 1957, when the College awarded him an honorary degree. State Senator (and later Governor) Mills Godwin, Jr. (W&M ’34), also pictured here, was a Democrat who served on the Gray Commission and received letters primarily from his Southside constituents. U.S. Representative William Tuck (W&M ’17), another Democrat, received letters not just from his Southside district but also from across the state, because he was a former governor and one of the leading segregationists in Virginia. He helped found the extremely pro-segregation Defenders of State Sovereignty and Individual Liberties. His correspondents included extremists who
advocated removal of the black population to Africa and the assassination of the president, vice president, and the entire Supreme Court.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Dr. James Jackson Preaching ‘When Life Deals You a Messed Up Hand'(SPADES)

Dr. James Anthony Jackson, a native of Mobile, Alabama, is the second of four children to Dr. Michael and Barbara Jackson. He accepted Jesus as his personal savior and was baptized at the age of seven at the Aimwell Missionary Baptist Church under the pastorate of his father, Dr. Michael Jackson, D.Min. At Aimwell, he served in the choir, Sunday school, and the Baptist Training Union. Pastor Jackson was educated in the Mobile County Public School System where he was a 1991 graduate of John L. Leflore High School. In 1994, he transferred from Bishop State Junior College to the historic Tuskegee University. It was there, at age 20, that he received his calling to the ministry. While at Tuskegee, Pastor Jackson served as an Associate Minister at the Mt. Olive Baptist Church under the leadership of Pastor John Curry. In 1997 he graduated from that institution acquiring his Bachelor of Science degree in Elementary Education. Pastor Jackson wasted no time, for he enrolled at the Samuel Dewitt Proctor School of Theology of Virginia Union University, in Richmond, Virginia. During his time in Virginia, Pastor Jackson served as an intern at the Trinity Baptist Church under the leadership of Dr. A. Lincoln James, Jr. He also served as an assistant to Rev. Sheridon Nelson who was the Director of Youth and Young Adults of the Baptist General Convention of Virginia. Also during his time in Virginia, Pastor Jackson had the privilege to spend one month studying and preaching in Ghana
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