I am looking for information on an NGO called AMURTEL, is it a legitimate volunteer aid org?

Question by Joyce H: I am looking for information on an NGO called AMURTEL, is it a legitimate volunteer aid org?
AMURT and AMURTEL are soliciting volunteers for overseas programs, specifically Kenya. I am interested in knowing how reputable and how safe the program is.

Best answer:

Answer by Mandy V
It looks like AMURT is considered legitimate by the American Council for Voluntary International Action
http://www.interaction.org/members/detail.php?id=65

From a google search it looks like they have partnered with FEMA, the UN and USAID

http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/cross-cutting_programs/private_voluntary_cooperation/volag06.pdf
(search the PDF for AMURT)

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Looking for a monster make-up artist in my area?

Question by Robert Peterson: Looking for a monster make-up artist in my area?
I want to become Voldemort for the Harry Potter premiere, and if possible I’d like a little professional help. I’m looking for someone in the Northern Virginia / D.C. / Southern Maryland area. I tried a place called Lucid Makeup Artistry, but they told me Voldemort was out of their league and I should find someone else to help me. Please, I’d really like to do something awesome this year!

Best answer:

Answer by Chris
Try reaching out to folks at MySocialBeauty. It’s a social networking site for people in the beauty profession, and there are a handful of special effects makeup artists on there I believe

What do you think? Answer below!

I am looking for a place that my wife and I can retire to. we like it warm year round but little humidity.?

Question by Terry K: I am looking for a place that my wife and I can retire to. we like it warm year round but little humidity.?
thinking western north and south carolina. I love to fish and like outdoors.

Best answer:

Answer by Hunglikhorse
The Rio Grande Valley in Texas. Although property taxes will kill ya!

What do you think? Answer below!

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – looking west – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – looking west – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking west at the bas-relief top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

Montgomery C Meigs grave – looking S detail – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

Montgomery C Meigs grave – looking S detail – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking southwest at the north face tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

Montgomery C Meigs tomb – looking W – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

Montgomery C Meigs tomb – looking W – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking west at the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States. In the foreground of the tomb is the grave marker of Meigs’ son, John Rodgers Meigs.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

i am looking for a former teacher in Chesapeake, Virginia?

Question by Raven L: i am looking for a former teacher in Chesapeake, Virginia?
My brother is looking for a former teacher he had at Western Branch High School in Chesapeake, Virginia. His name is Mr Gaines and he was a spanish teacher and a track coach. We know he was there until 1992. Plase help if you can.
His first name starts with an R. I am not sure if it is Robert or Richard

Best answer:

Answer by K
Use a people search but you may have to pay about 10.00 for all his details. It might be better if you knew his first name though.

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I’m looking for the best possible overnight hike in Western West Virginia. Scenery, solitude a priority!?

Question by Mister Bluz: I’m looking for the best possible overnight hike in Western West Virginia. Scenery, solitude a priority!?
Driving from Columbus Ohio. The less time I’m on the road the more time I have for Hiking. I have time for 3 days and 2 nights. Thanks for any imput you might have….. I have hiked the Monongahela forest in the past and can see why they say WV…almost heaven. Thanks in advance…Mister Bluz

Best answer:

Answer by scotishbob
Go to Harper’s Ferry and hike the AT in either direction. The scenery is outstanding and by now there are few on this part of the AT.

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My family and I are going too Virginia Beach for vacation this summer, and we were looking for cheap hotels.?

Question by bmdsgirl28: My family and I are going too Virginia Beach for vacation this summer, and we were looking for cheap hotels.?
Does anyone know where we can find a good Hotel for a good price, there is 5 of us in my family so if anyone knows a good place?
where is a nice place to camp in virginia beach that is close to the beach?

Best answer:

Answer by BabyCakes
Camp out.

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