Dover Hydraulic elevator #4 @ Bedford Memorial Hospital Bedford VA

even though it says #1 it is elevator bank #4 at the hospital and the only one with a phone. #3 is staff only so i did not ride. I rode elevator 1 and 2. the videos will be up shortly. number 2 is a real treat 🙂

Lincoln Memorial

Lincoln Memorial
Virginia Union University
Image by dbking
Lincoln Memorial
West End of the National Mall

— The Lincoln Memorial is a tribute to President Abraham Lincoln and the nation he fought to preserve during the Civil War (1861-1865).

— The Lincoln Memorial was built to resemble a Greek temple.

—The number of columns surrounding the Memorial (36) represent the number of states that remained in the Union at the conclusion of the Civil War (the time of Lincoln’s death)

—The number of steps to the first landing…13…representing the original 13 colonies…once you cross that landing, then you begin to climb the number of steps which represent Abe’s age at his assassination.

—The number of steps from the base to the area where Lincoln’s statue is located represents the age that Lincoln was when he was assassinated…it’s either 52 or 56—the memory has faded on the correct number.

—The number of steps from the reflecting pool to the chamber where the statue is total 87 which represents the phrase “four score and 7 years ago” (a score of years is 20, so 4 score + 7 = 87) from the Gettysburg Address

—The number of steps to the first landing…13…representing the original 13 colonies…once you cross that landing, then you begin to climb the number of steps which represent Abe’s age at his assassination.

—The statue itself is 19′ tall, as is the statue of Jefferson at the Jefferson Memorial. No statue will ever be any taller than 19’….in deference to "Freedom" atop the US Capitol building which is 19’6" to honor the ideal of freedom as the ultimate ideal. Additionally this is so that no president is shown as being more "important" than any other.

—The statue itself has significant symbolism…look at the hands on the arm-rest of the chair he is seated in

A common belief is:
…the left hand is in the formation of a fist…to represent the strength that it took to go to war to save the union, the right hand is an open palm down—to represent a "welcoming gesture" to the southern states back to the union.

This is much debated….Daniel Chester French had a deaf child, it is also said the hands are in the positions they are to represent the letters "A" and "L" in the American Sign Language so to represent "Abraham" and "Lincoln" for his deaf son. Howver, this has not been proven. The only known statue that French created which has use of ASL is on the campus of Gallaudet Univeristy, the nation’s only university for the deaf in NE Washington DC.

—Around the frieze at the top of the Memorial you will see the state seals of the 48 states that were part of the union at the time of dedication.

—Inscribed on the south wall of the monument is the Gettysburg Address. Above it is a mural painted by Jules Guerin depicting the angel of truth freeing a slave. Guerin also painted the unity of North and South mural on the north wall. Etched into the north wall below the mural is Lincoln’s second inaugural speech. On the north wall there is a spelling error, in the second column about 3/4 of the way down the word "future" is carved as "uture"

—The memorial was dedicated – 1922

—At the dedication ceremony, the freed blacks were sitting off the side — this was a huge insult to those former slaves in attendance especially since the keynote speaker for the dedication was from Dr. Robert Moton, President of the Tuskeegee Institute.

—the sole surviving son of Lincoln (Robert Todd) was in attendance to witness that ceremony

—The bridge we call Memorial Bridge, leading from Bacon Circle/Lincoln Memorial to Arlington National Cemetery is significant in its location since it is a "symbolic link" between the north and the south for which Lincoln went to war to save. This bridge is a significant symbol because, the land that comprises Arlington National Cemetery was owned by the Lee family of Virginia (yes, the Robert E Lee-who led the south in war).

—On Easter Sunday 1939, operatic soprano Marian Anderson sang here in front of 75,000 people after DAR Constitution Hall and the D.C. Board of Education refused to let her perform in their venues.

— In 1963 more than 250,000 participants in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom heard Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. deliver his magnificent “I Have a Dream” speech from the memorial’s steps. In August 2003, the 40th Anniversary of the “March on Washington for Freedom”, a plaque was added on the steps to commemorate the exact spot where Martin Luther King Jr. stood to deliver his now famous “I Have A Dream Speech” a landing 18 steps below the chamber.)

—The Lincoln Memorial is shown on the reverse of the United States penny. In his treatise Theory and Practise of Numismatic Design, Steve Crooks states that because the Lincoln Memorial is shown in sufficient detail to discern the statue of Lincoln on the reverse of the penny, Abraham Lincoln is the only person to be depicted on both the obverse and reverse of the same United States coin.

The Lincoln Memorial is on the back of the U.S. bill, which bears Lincoln’s portrait on the front.

Lincoln is the only president shown on both the front and reverse of a US coin (the penny). The "heads" side shows his portrait, the reverse shows him, as the memorial built to him does.

Jefferson Memorial

Jefferson Memorial
Virginia Union University
Image by dbking
Jefferson Memorial

THOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826)
•Third President of the United States (1801-1908)
•Second Vice President, serving with John Adams, although they were from different political parties (1797-1801)
•First Secretary of State
•Prolific writer
•Primary author of the Declaration of Independence
•Delegate to the Continental Congress
•Governor of Virginia (1779-1781)
•Founder of the University of Virginia (in Charlottesville)
•Experimental planter who started the wine industry in Virginia
•Musician
•Architect who submitted designs anonymously for both the Capitol and the White House
•Inventor who invented wire coat hangers, swivel chairs and sliding doors

•Cornerstone laid in 1939

•Dedicated by Franklin Delano Roosevelt on April 13, 1943 — the 200th anniversary of Jefferson’s birth

•Original architect, John Russell Pope, envisioned a memorial twice this size; his partners scaled it down after taking over the project on Pope’s death

•Classical design, modelled after Jefferson’s design of the Rotunda of the University of Virginia, which Jefferson based on the Pantheon in Rome

•The 26 Ionic columns symbolize the 26 states in the Union at the end of Jefferson’s terms as president . The addition of the territory provided in the Louisiana Purchase gave rise to the 13 additional states.

•The carving on the tympanum (triangular section of the pediment over the entrance to the memorial) was designed by Adolph Alexander Weinman; it represents the five-man committee assigned by the Continental Congress to draft the Declaration of Independence; the figures from left to right are:
Benjamin Franklin
John Adams
Thomas Jefferson (standing)
Roger Sherman
Robert Livingston

•FDR asked that the memorial be placed so he could see it from the White House and gain inspiration; if you stand with your back to Jefferson, you can see the White House across the Tidal Basin through the trees

The Statue
•Designed by Rudolph Evans

•19 feet tall, made of bronze

•Jefferson is posed as if he were addressing the Continental Congress

•In his left hand he holds a copy of the Declaration of Independence

•He is wearing a coat given to him by Tadeusz Kosciuszko, Polish patriot who fought in the Revolutionary War

•The bronze statue was not installed when the Memorial was dedicated; a war-time limit on civilian use of bronze prohibited its casting; a full-size plaster statue was placed here which the bronze statue replaced in 1948

The Carved Texts
•The texts carved on the interior walls of the memorial are excerpts from various writings of Jefferson

•Behind the statue and to the right is an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence

•Immediately to your right as you enter the rotunda is an excerpt from the Act for Religious Freedom written by Jefferson and passed by the Virginia legislature — Jefferson considered this act to be one of his three most important accomplishments

•Immediately to your left as you enter the rotunda are six quotations from Jefferson’s letters and notes on slavery and education

•Behind the statue and to the left are quotations on government taken from a letter written to Samuel Kercheval in 1816

•The quotation encircling the base of the dome was taken from a letter written to Benjamin Rush in 1800

————————————————————————————————————–

The Jefferson Memorial is a monument in Washington, DC to Thomas Jefferson. It combines a low neo-classical saucer dome with a portico.
By 1930, there were monuments in Washington commemorating great United States presidents such as Abraham Lincoln and George Washington. President Franklin Roosevelt thought that Thomas Jefferson also deserved a monument.
In 1934, following his initiative, Congress passed a resolution to create a monument commemorating Jefferson. The memorial was designed by John Russell Pope (1874 – 1937), the architect of the original (west) building of the National Gallery of Art. It reflects characteristics of buildings designed by Jefferson such as Monticello and the Rotunda, which were a result of his fascination with Roman architecture. It bears a close resemblance to the Pantheon of Rome. The cornerstone was laid in 1939 and the monument cost slightly more than million. It was officially dedicated in 1943, after Pope’s death. One of the last American public monuments in the Beaux-Arts tradition, it was severely criticized even as it was being built, by those who adhered to the modernist argument that dressing 20th-century buildings like Greek and Roman temples constituted a "tired architectural lie." More than 60 years ago, Pope responded with silence to critics who dismissed him as part of an enervated architectural elite practicing "styles that are safely dead".

The Thomas Jefferson Memorial, modeled after the Pantheon of Rome, is America’s foremost memorial to our third president. As an original adaptation of Neoclassical architecture, it is a key landmark in the monumental core of Washington, DC The circular, colonnaded structure in the classic style was introduced to this country by Thomas Jefferson. Architect John Russell Pope used Jefferson’s own architectural tastes in the design of the Memorial. His intention was to synthesize Jefferson’s contribution as a statesman, architect, President, drafter of the Declaration of Independence, adviser of the Constitution and founder of the University of Virginia. Architects Daniel P. Higgins and Otto R. Eggers took over construction upon the untimely death of Pope in August 1937. The Thomas Jefferson Memorial Commission was created to direct the erection of a memorial to Thomas Jefferson by an Act of Congress approved in June 1934. The present-day location at the Tidal Basin was selected in 1937. The site caused considerable public criticism because it resulted in the removal of Japanese flowering cherry trees from the Tidal Basin. Further controversy surrounded the selection of the design of the Memorial. The Commission of Fine Arts objected to the pantheon design because it would compete with the Lincoln Memorial. The Thomas Jefferson Commission took the design controversy to President Franklin D. Roosevelt who preferred the pantheon design and gave his permission to proceed. On November 15, 1939, a ceremony was held in which President Roosevelt laid the cornerstone of the Memorial.
In 1941, Rudolph Evans was commissioned to sculpt the statue of Thomas Jefferson. The statue of Jefferson looks out from the interior of the Memorial toward the White House. It was intended to represent the Age of Enlightenment and Jefferson as a philosopher and statesman. The bronze statue is 19 feet tall and weighs five tons. Adolph A. Weinman’s sculpture of the five members of the Declaration of Independence drafting committee submitting their report to Congress is featured on the triangular pediment. Also noteworthy, and adorning the interior of the Memorial, are five quotations taken from Jefferson’s writings that illustrate the principles to which he dedicated his life.

Few major changes have been made to the Memorial since its dedication in 1943. The most important change to note is the replacement of the plaster model statue of Thomas Jefferson by the bronze statue after the World War II restrictions on the use of metals were lifted. Each year the Jefferson Memorial plays host to various ceremonies, including annual Memorial exercises, Easter Sunrise Services and the ever-popular Cherry Blossom Festival. The Jefferson Memorial is administered and maintained by the National Park Service.

•Ground breaking: December 15, 1938.
•Architect: John Russell Pope.
•Cornerstone laid: November 15, 1939.
•Sculpture of Jefferson statue: Rudolph Evans.
•Sculpture of relief above entrance: A.A. Wineman.
•Total cost: ,192,312.
•Size of grounds: 2.5 acres (1.0117 hectare, 10117.1 square meters).
•Estimated Weight: 32,000 tons.
•Height from road to top of dome: 129 feet, 4 inches (39.42 meters).
•Height from floor to ceiling of dome: 91 feet, 8 inches (27.94 meters).
•Height from floor to top of dome – exterior: 95 feet, 8 inches (29.16 meters).
•Thickness of dome: 4 feet (1.22 meters).
•Weight of memorial: 32,000 tons (29029.9 metric tons).
•Piers to bedrock (maximum depth): 138 feet, 3 inches (42.14 meters).
•Ceiling: Indiana limestone.
•Exterior walls and columns: Danby Imperial Marble (Vermont).
•Interior floor: Tennessee pink marble.
•Interior wall panels: Georgian white marble.
•Pedestal: Missouri gray marble.

•Statue Height: 19 feet (5.79 meters).
•Height of pedestal: 6 feet (1.83 meters).
•Material: Bronze.
•Statue Weight: 10,000 pounds (4535.92 kilograms).

College Memorial Park Cemetery, Houston, Texas 0101111336BW

College Memorial Park Cemetery, Houston, Texas 0101111336BW
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Patrick Feller
The Texas Historical Commission Marker Reads:

REV. JOHN HENRY "JACK" YATES
(JULY 11, 1828 – DECEMBER 22, 1897)

THE REV. JOHN HENRY "JACK" YATES, AN IMPORTANT LEADER IN HOUSTON’S LATE 19TH CENTURY AFRICAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY, WAS BORN INTO SLAVERY IN GLOUCESTER, VIRGINIA, WHERE HE LEARNED TO READ AND WRITE. AFTER ATTENDING SLAVE RELIGIOUS MEETINGS, YATES BECAME A CHRISTIAN. HE SOON BEGAN VISITING NEARBY FARMS TO HOLD PRAYER MEETINGS. HE AND HIS WIFE HARRIET (WILLIS) REARED ELEVEN CHILDREN. AFTER HER DEATH IN 1887, HE AND HIS SECOND WIFE, ANNIE (FREEMAN), HAD ONE SON.

BY 1863, YATES MOVED WITH HIS SLAVE OWNER TO MATAGORDA COUNTY, TEXAS. AFTER EMANCIPATION, THE YATES FAMILY MOVED TO HOUSTON, WHERE JACK WORKED AS A DRAYMAN AND PREACHED TO BAPTIST CONGREGATIONS ON NIGHTS AND SUNDAYS. HE WAS ORDAINED AND BECAME MINISTER OF ANTIOCH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH IN 1868. THE REV. YATES ENCOURAGED HIS CONGREGANTS TO EDUCATE THEMSELVES, ACQUIRES PROPERTY AND LEARN TRADES. HE LED BY EXAMPLE, PURCHASING LAND IN 1869 AND 1870 IN THE FREEDMEN’S TOWN NEIGHBORHOOD OF FOURTH WARD.

DURING YATES’ PASTORATE, ANTIOCH MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH BECAME A CENTER OF SOCIAL, POLITICAL, EDUCATIONAL, ECONOMIC AND RECREATIONAL ACTIVITY. THE REV. YATES ALSO HELPED TO ORGANIZE OTHER AREA CHURCHES AND WAS A COFOUNDER OF EMANCIPATION PARK (1872). HE LOBBIED FOR BISHOP COLLEGE, THE FIRST BLACK BAPTIST COLLEGE IN TEXAS, TO BE IN HOUSTON, BUT IT OPENED IN MARSHALL IN 1881, SO HE ESTABLISHED HOUSTON BAPTIST ACADEMY IN 1885. IT WAS LATER KNOWN AS HOUSTON COLLEGE. THE REV. YATES LEFT ANTIOCH IN 1890 AND THEN ORGANIZED BETHEL BAPTIST CHURCH. YATES DIED IN 1897, BUT HIS IMPACT AS A SIGIFICANT FIGURE IN HOUSTON’S AFRICAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY STILL RESOUNDS TODAY

One of the three oldest African-American cemeteries in Houston.

www.historictexas.net/cemeteries/3c/2h/harris/harris-mark…