USA Allstars vs. Iroquois National team

LIVE from Blue Cross Arena in Rochester on Saturday, October 13th at 8:00 pm Eastern. Team USA vs. Iroquois National team Visit www.nll.com to find out more/ or article: blog.syracuse.com DON’T FORGET TO: Subscribe to TLN for more great lacrosse content! LIKE TLN on Facebook www.facebook.com Follow TLN on Twitter www.twitter.com
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Michelle Obama at VCU to Announce National Initiative

First lady Michelle Obama visited Virginia Commonwealth University on Wednesday to announce an initiative of the country’s top medical colleges and universities to create a new generation of doctors, medical schools and research facilities to ensure that service men and women receive the medical care they deserve: www.news.vcu.edu
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John Rodgers Meigs tomb – foot – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – foot – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Closeup of the foot of the bas-relief top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

Montgomery Meigs Macomb grave – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

Montgomery Meigs Macomb grave – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking north at the flat headstone of Montgomery Meigs Macomb, part of the cluser of graves which comprise the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States. This headstone is just northwest of the main Meigs tomb.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – looking west – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – looking west – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking west at the bas-relief top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

Holiday Inn National Airport/Crystal City – Arlington, Virginia

Hotel and Resort photography & video by PhotoWeb (photowebusa.com) Situated near Washington, DC, the full-service Holiday Inn® National Airport/Crystal City offers superior comfort for both leisure and business travelers. We’re conveniently located near Union Station and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA). Our hotel is within minutes of the nation’s capital and attractions. Many guests enjoy touring the Pentagon, Smithsonian Institute, and monuments throughout Washington, DC, while Crystal City is a favorite shopping destination for our hotel’s guests. Old Town Alexandria is the perfect place for viewing the Potomac River and is just one of many historic districts around Arlington, Virginia. This modern hotel is also convenient to many northern Virginia companies including IBM, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, EPA, Raytheon, USPTO, and Navy Elite and we feature a 24-hour Business Center and flexible meeting facilities. Government contract and military travelers are invited to try our unique per diem package. Our extensive amenities and friendly staff are notable among hotels near Washington, DC Guests can surf the free high-speed, wired and wireless Internet access throughout the hotel, visit the gift shop, work out in the 24-hour Fitness Center, and enjoy a meal at O’Malley’s Sports Pub or The National Diner, where kids eat free! Travelers in search of a great deal should look no further than this Crystal City hotel

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – upper detail – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – upper detail – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Closeup of the bas-relief top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite
Virginia Hotels
Image by wallyg
Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy, brother of President John F. Kennedy, former attorney general (1961-1965), United States Senator (1965-1968) and presidential candidate, was shot in the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, following his victory in the California primary and died the next morning. His funeral Mass took place at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York on June 8. The remains were then transported upon a slow-moving train to Washington, D.C., stopping all northbound traffic with many people gathered along the route to pay tribute to Senator Kennedy. The long transport necessitated an evening interment–to date the only to ever take place at Arlintong National Cemetery.

The casket was borne from the train by 13 pallbearers, including former astronaut John Glenn, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, family friend Gen. Maxwell Taylor, Robert’s eldest son Joe and his brother Senator Edward Kennedy. The procession stopped once during the drive to Arlington National Cemetery at the Lincoln Memorial where the Marine Corps Band played "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The funeral motorcade arrived at the cemetery at 10:30 p.m. The brief grave-side service was conducted by Terence Cardinal Cook, Archbishop of Washington. Afterward the folded flag was presented to Ethel and Joe Kennedy in behalf of the United States by John Glenn.

In 1971 a more-elaborate grave site was completed, at the request of the Kennedy family, by architect I.M. Pei. The new grave site retains the simple, white Christian cross of the earlier site, and adds a granite plaza with inscriptions from Senator Kennedy’s two most notable addresses:

"It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance." – Robert F. Kennedy, South Africa, 1966

"Some men see things as they are and ask ‘Why?’ I dream things that never were and ask, ‘Why not?’" – Robert F. Kennedy, 1968

Arlington National Cemetery, a military cemetery directly across the Potomac from Washington, D.c., was established during the Civil War on the grounds of the Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. By 1864, the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria were filled with Union dead. After Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs quickly selected Arlington as a replacement, in part to prevent the Lee’s from ever returning, the government confiscated the land claiming unpaid property taxes. Today, more than 300,000 people, including veterans and military casualties from every one of the nation’s wars, are interred in the 624-acre cemetery administered by the Department of the Navy.

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011

John Rodgers Meigs tomb – Arlington National Cemetery – 2011
Virginia Union University
Image by dctim1
Looking slightly northwest at the top of the grave marker of John Rodgers Meigs, adjacent to the tomb of Montgomery C. Meigs, founder of Arlington National Cemtery. The tomb is located in Section 1 of the cemetery, which is located in Arlington, Virginia, in the United States.

Montgomery Cunningham Meigs (May 3, 1816-January 2, 1892) was a Georgian who graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1836. He entered the Corps of Engineeers, and oversaw numerous civil engineering projects in and around Washington, D.C., (including the construction of the Capitol Dome). He was promoted to Brigadier General on May 15, 1861, and appointed Quartermaster General. Meigs successfully proposed that the grounds of Robert E. Lee’s estate in Arlington, Virginia, be transformed into a cemetery for Civil War Dead. The first burial there was made on May 13, 1864. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton approved the establishment of a military cemetery on June 15, 1864. During his tenure as Superintendent of Arlington National Cemtery, Meigs erected the Memorial to Civil War Unknown Dead, the Old Amphitheater, enclosed the cemetery in a low sandstone wall, constructed roads and pathways, and erected the McClellan Gate (on which he had inscribed his own name). Meigs was forced to retire as Quartermaster General in 1882.

Meigs picked out the plot for and designed his own tomb. It sits on a 2 foot, 6 inch high base of rough rectangular gray granite stones mortared together like bricks. The tomb itself is in the shape of a 3 feet high, 6 feet long white marble sarcophagus. It is oriented along an east-west axis. On the south side of the tomb is an inscription to Meigs’ wife, Louisa. She was the daughter of U.S. Navy Commodote John Rodgers.

However, before Meigs or his wife had died, another burial occurred alongside their plot. Their son, John Rodgers Meigs, was a lieutenant in the Corps of Engineers. He was killed near Harrisonburg, Virginia, in October 1864. Meigs designed a marker for his son’s burial site. A 2 foot high base of green marble supports a bronze bas-relief image of the younger Meigs in full Union Army uniform and gear, lying dead in a muddy road. Discarded Confederate military gear lies alongside him. The prints of horses’ hooves can be seen in the mud, implying that John Rodgers Meigs was trampled by fleeing Confederate troops.

Meigs had his grandfather’s remains moved to lie next to his own tomb. His grandfather, Samuel William Meigs, died in 1818 and was buried in Congressional Cemetery. The original tombstone, a 2 foot square stone block set on two rectangular bases, was moved as well. Buried with Samuel was his father and Montgomery C. Meigs’ grandfather, Josiah Meigs. Josiah was president of the University of Georgia from 1800 to 1811. Bronze plaques on the tombstone commemorate both me.

Buried northwest adjacent to the Meigs tomb are Montgomery Meigs Macomb and his wife, Caroline. Macomb was Montgomery C. Meig’s nephew (son of his wife Lousia’s sister, Ann Minerva Rodgers Macomb). He served as Montgomery C. Meigs’ aide-de-camp from 1875 to 1876. He himself rose to be a brigadier general, served in the Spanish-American War and World War I, and was military governor of Hawaii after it was forcibly annexed by the U.S.