Where is a inexpensive place to stay outside Washington DC with access to the metro?

Question by angel1183: Where is a inexpensive place to stay outside Washington DC with access to the metro?
I would like to go there mid August. I don’t mind staying in a suburb as long as there is an easy way to get to the city. I want to stay in a motel/hotel, not in a hostile. Thank you!

Best answer:

Answer by nickdc1960
The closer into the city you get, the more you will pay for a hotel. So, your best bet is to find a hotel that is outside of Washington DC BUT close to the Metro (subway system).

I hightly recommend Virginia, as it is safer than Maryland. I’ve had people visit from out of town and I had them stay at a place near Van Dorn Street near Alexandria Virginia; I think it’s a Comfort Inn or Days Inn or something like that. But, it’s only about 1 mile from the Van Dorn Street Metro Station AND they have a free shuttle van if you wish to take it back and forth. They also have free parking at the place.

So, what you want to do is look at the DC Metro/subway system map online THEN compare it to the hotels that are featured online. Most will indicate how far they are from the Metro stations and if they offer a shuttle van.

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Fans outside Demi’s hotel in Argentina :D

Todos los videos que pude hacer hoy.. mis compas de al lado no tienen muy buen inglés, que se le va a hacer? Yo no canté porque por algún motivo no cantaba mientras filmaba… En 0:21 me pueden escuchar decir TE AMOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 1- Demi saludando desde el balcón 2- ole ole ole ole. demi demi demi demi lalalalala 3- Give your heart a break 4- Rascacielo 5- Lo que soy 6- Lesbian for Demi. jajajajajaja 7- Demi se da a la fuga…… 8- Pelado ortiva .. presentando tambien, son ustedes, maxi 9- La banda de demi empieza a salir.. 10- mis intentos desesperados por conseguir un autografo (y mis fracasos) 11- El tecladista que me dio la mano ♥♥♥♥ y bueno nada ahi terminan mis 10 horas de hotellll

Coalminer C.K. Parker, His Wife and 14-Year-Old Daughter Outside Their Home at Claypool Hill near Richlands, Virginia 04/1974

Coalminer C.K. Parker, His Wife and 14-Year-Old Daughter Outside Their Home at Claypool Hill near Richlands, Virginia 04/1974
Colleges In Virginia
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Coalminer C.K. Parker, His Wife and 14-Year-Old Daughter Outside Their Home at Claypool Hill near Richlands, Virginia. He Works for the Virginia-Pocahontas Coal Company as an Electrician His Father Was a Federal Coalmine Inspector in Virginia, and Her Father and Grandfather Were Miners in West Virginia. Parker Drives 18 Miles to Work, and Is Typical of the Miners in the Area Who Commute to Work. The Parkers Feel the Image of the Miner in a Cabin Is Wrong 04/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-13904

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
Richlands (Tazewell county, Virginia, United States) inhabited place
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556356

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

door, front, downstairs – painted (outside) – IMG_3304 (20110720)

door, front, downstairs – painted (outside) – IMG_3304 (20110720)
Virginia Insurance
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
It’s gray, not white. Love how the storm door down there is rotted through in parts. This is a new custom storm door we paid like 0+ for from Hechinger right before it turned into Home Depot (2001ish). It’s half the age of our front/back storm doors, and yet is rotting out while they are not. Screwed by contractors yet again — contractors are the worst scum on earth and will perform shoddy work that screws the customer close to 75% of the time. Our utility room storm door rotted out to the point of literally falling apart and leaving only a frame, but it was wood, so that is understandable. THIS door is supposed to be vinyl. Obviously not all vinyl is the same! Some of it is made up of discarded different types of vinyl left over from other processes. Like a hot dog being made of different meats. That was one of the point Thompson Creek made to us about their windows: It’s all the same kind of vinyl, and it’s high quality. Unlike this storm door, our windows came with a lifetime warranty transferrable to the next owner of the house. So I tend to believe them. Whereas Hechinger? They went out of business. This is probably a part of that.

ADT sticker, Secured by ADT sticker, front door, house maintenance, screen, stairs, storm door.
after painting.

front yard, Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

July 20, 2011.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL.wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL.wordpress.com

BACKSTORY: While dealing with Farmers insurance & Progressive/Homesite insurance’s dropping our policy for us having peeling window sill paint (among other things), we had to do a bunch of house repairs. While painting our window sills, we also painted other surfaces that needed painting, such as doors, railings, soffits, stairs, gutters, pipes, and cinder block walls.

window, living room (rear) – from outside – IMG_3685 (20111014)

window, living room (rear) – from outside – IMG_3685 (20111014)
Virginia Insurance
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
Our rear living room window, now repainted, from the outside. The only true single-pane window left in the house; this one would be over 00 to replace thanks to government building codes requiring much more expensive tempered glass to be used, because this window is over stairs and could hurt someone on the stairs when it breaks. So government safety regulations actually made it so expensive to replace that we changed our mind and didn’t — actually making things less safe and less energy efficient. This is how government regulation often has the opposite effect, and is not a magic answer to all societal problems.

Oops, painted this window shut too.

Sacrificial boards are used a lot in my house. I guess it’s an "old wood window thing". I paid a good + for another piece of crown moulding to put over the sill. The idea is that the sacrificial wood rots before the actual sill. In this window’s case, the old sacrificial board was so rotten you could rip it off the nails and into pieces with your pinky finger. The sill itself was rotted out too. I spent a week or two building it up with successive layers of Elmer’s wood filler. It kept raining on my wood filler and I’d have to start over! Eventually, though, it was built up enough to be flat enough to nail a NEW sacrificial board to. Hopefully this is the last paint job this sill will ever need. At some point in the future when we have more disposable income, we’ll replace this window. (We need about ,000 in new windows, so it’s going to be awhile…)

You can also see the chimney to our old boiler. I actually had an ex-friend argue with me in the past about whether that that’s what this was. Not sure why people think I don’t know my own house. This chimney once tried to kill me by being blocked up and filling the house with diesel fumes. Fortunately the smoke was thick enough to break the laser on our cd player, turning the music off so that I was able to hear the carbon monoxide alarm. I was sleeping in the basement. Carolyn was upstairs. I probably would have left her a widow if that alarm hadn’t gone off. We don’t use a boiler or CD players anymore. Heat pumps are way safer in terms of CO2.

You can also see the soffit damage due to raccoons, as well as some leftover rope from the "roof tarp years". That rope came in handy when painting!

The gutters for this part of the house rotted off. Estimate for just that one ~6-foot section of gutter to be replaced? 0! Ouch! The parts are less than 0! I’ve seen gutter crimpers in use. It shouldn’t cost THAT much. I think if I just had "a guy" come do it, instead of a licensed business — that it would be way cheaper.

boiler chimney, house maintenance, living room window, raccoon damage, sacrificial board, soffit.

back yard, Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

October 14, 2011.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL.wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL.wordpress.com

BACKSTORY: So our homeowners insurance (Farmers) got dropped due to having peeling paint on our window sills (among other things). Weak. It was a LOT of work AND money for us to repaint all our sills. Wood windows SUCK!! Modern vinyl windows are MAINTANENCE-FREE!! Wood windows… You gotta re-glaze the panes when they fall out, and then the wood itself is always going to slowly rot away. We already had our cats knock a pane out, so we already had glazing compound for pane repairs. This came in handy when we painted our various window sills, as some also needed glazing compound.

It was quite a pain because it cost so much money and had our living room in disarray for so many months, and the whole insurance basis for the situation was pretty bullshitty in the first place. We’re not going to make a property damage claim due to moisture that occurs because our windows let in moisture because their paint was peeling! Ridiculous… Is paint really all that’s holding us back from having property damage through our windows? I DON’T THINK SO, as no moisture was getting in prior to repainting. Just total hassling from Farmers *AND* Progressive Insurance. NationWide, however, appears to finally be on my side.

window, living room (rear) – from outside – IMG_3687 (20111014)

window, living room (rear) – from outside – IMG_3687 (20111014)
Virginia Insurance
Image by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos (ClintJCL)
Our rear living room window, now repainted, from the outside. The only true single-pane window left in the house; this one would be over 00 to replace thanks to government building codes requiring much more expensive tempered glass to be used, because this window is over stairs and could hurt someone on the stairs when it breaks. So government safety regulations actually made it so expensive to replace that we changed our mind and didn’t — actually making things less safe and less energy efficient. This is how government regulation often has the opposite effect, and is not a magic answer to all societal problems.

Oops, painted this window shut too.

Sacrificial boards are used a lot in my house. I guess it’s an "old wood window thing". I paid a good + for another piece of crown moulding to put over the sill. The idea is that the sacrificial wood rots before the actual sill. In this window’s case, the old sacrificial board was so rotten you could rip it off the nails and into pieces with your pinky finger. The sill itself was rotted out too. I spent a week or two building it up with successive layers of Elmer’s wood filler. It kept raining on my wood filler and I’d have to start over! Eventually, though, it was built up enough to be flat enough to nail a NEW sacrificial board to. Hopefully this is the last paint job this sill will ever need. At some point in the future when we have more disposable income, we’ll replace this window. (We need about ,000 in new windows, so it’s going to be awhile…)

You can also see the chimney to our old boiler. I actually had an ex-friend argue with me in the past about whether that that’s what this was. Not sure why people think I don’t know my own house. This chimney once tried to kill me by being blocked up and filling the house with diesel fumes. Fortunately the smoke was thick enough to break the laser on our cd player, turning the music off so that I was able to hear the carbon monoxide alarm. I was sleeping in the basement. Carolyn was upstairs. I probably would have left her a widow if that alarm hadn’t gone off. We don’t use a boiler or CD players anymore. Heat pumps are way safer in terms of CO2.

You can also see the soffit damage due to raccoons, as well as some leftover rope from the "roof tarp years". That rope came in handy when painting!

The gutters for this part of the house rotted off. Estimate for just that one ~6-foot section of gutter to be replaced? 0! Ouch! The parts are less than 0! I’ve seen gutter crimpers in use. It shouldn’t cost THAT much. I think if I just had "a guy" come do it, instead of a licensed business — that it would be way cheaper.

boiler chimney, house maintenance, living room window, raccoon damage, sacrificial board, soffit.

back yard, Clint and Carolyn’s house, Alexandria, Virginia.

October 14, 2011.

… Read my blog at ClintJCL.wordpress.com
… Read Carolyn’s blog at CarolynCASL.wordpress.com

BACKSTORY: So our homeowners insurance (Farmers) got dropped due to having peeling paint on our window sills (among other things). Weak. It was a LOT of work AND money for us to repaint all our sills. Wood windows SUCK!! Modern vinyl windows are MAINTANENCE-FREE!! Wood windows… You gotta re-glaze the panes when they fall out, and then the wood itself is always going to slowly rot away. We already had our cats knock a pane out, so we already had glazing compound for pane repairs. This came in handy when we painted our various window sills, as some also needed glazing compound.

It was quite a pain because it cost so much money and had our living room in disarray for so many months, and the whole insurance basis for the situation was pretty bullshitty in the first place. We’re not going to make a property damage claim due to moisture that occurs because our windows let in moisture because their paint was peeling! Ridiculous… Is paint really all that’s holding us back from having property damage through our windows? I DON’T THINK SO, as no moisture was getting in prior to repainting. Just total hassling from Farmers *AND* Progressive Insurance. NationWide, however, appears to finally be on my side.