Virginia City and Carson City Nevada VC&C Railway – Gold Hill Spur

On July 23, 2010 we took a short trip on the Virginia City and Carson City Railway to Gold Hill and back. It was well worth the trip to see the old mine workings from one of the largest gold strikes in history called the Comstock Lode. Incredible views of the desert mountain scapes, old mining tailings, equipment, and buildings dot route from Virginia City to Gold Hill. Travel back in time to the 1800s on this railway experience. Enjoy the video. It was taken on a small Olympus digital camera. The background music is from a group called The Boys from Joe Denny’s Saloon.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

The West Virginia & Pittsburg Railway: A Western Maryland Predecessor

The West Virginia & Pittsburg Railway: A Western Maryland Predecessor

Beginning as a narrow gauge line in 1880, its name and gauge changed in 1881 and in the ensuing years it opened a huge swathe of timber and coal territory in northern West Virginia to use, creating such towns as Elkins, Davis, and Thomas. A major connection was made with the C&O’s Greenbrier Branch at Durbin, W. Va. in 1900. Sold to the Gould interests in 1902 it became an important part of the Western Maryland Railway in 1905 and contributed heavily to that road’s prosperity in the coal and lumber trade down to modern times. This book is illustrated with superb photos, written in a cogent and informative style based on outstanding scholarly research in basic documents. The story is carried down through the WM and Chessie System eras to today’s CSX operations on the remaining lines. A must for those interested in West Virginia, mountain railroading, and coal and lumber development. This is the second volume by this author. His West Virginia’s Coal & Coke Railway – A B&O Predecessor, published by TLC last year, has been a best seller and has gathered great reviews for its completeness, accuracy, insight, and appearance. This new work is comparable!

List Price: $ 32.95

Price: $ 21.75