Founder of the town Reston Virginia : Robert E Simon – Feb 29th 2008

Founder of the town Reston Virginia : Robert E Simon – Feb 29th 2008
Virginia Network
Image by ShashiBellamkonda
I saw Robert E Simon walk in to the Cafe Monmarte in Reston as i was having lunch with Sotwe Boyd. Stowe Boyd is a Reston Veteran and knows everybody. He pointed me to Robert E Simon and I went over nad asked him if I could take a picture.
As the Network Solutions Social Media Swami I am meeting some great people. Robert E Simon is a legend- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_E._Simon

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite
Virginia Hotels
Image by wallyg
Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy, brother of President John F. Kennedy, former attorney general (1961-1965), United States Senator (1965-1968) and presidential candidate, was shot in the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, following his victory in the California primary and died the next morning. His funeral Mass took place at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York on June 8. The remains were then transported upon a slow-moving train to Washington, D.C., stopping all northbound traffic with many people gathered along the route to pay tribute to Senator Kennedy. The long transport necessitated an evening interment–to date the only to ever take place at Arlintong National Cemetery.

The casket was borne from the train by 13 pallbearers, including former astronaut John Glenn, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, family friend Gen. Maxwell Taylor, Robert’s eldest son Joe and his brother Senator Edward Kennedy. The procession stopped once during the drive to Arlington National Cemetery at the Lincoln Memorial where the Marine Corps Band played "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The funeral motorcade arrived at the cemetery at 10:30 p.m. The brief grave-side service was conducted by Terence Cardinal Cook, Archbishop of Washington. Afterward the folded flag was presented to Ethel and Joe Kennedy in behalf of the United States by John Glenn.

In 1971 a more-elaborate grave site was completed, at the request of the Kennedy family, by architect I.M. Pei. The new grave site retains the simple, white Christian cross of the earlier site, and adds a granite plaza with inscriptions from Senator Kennedy’s two most notable addresses:

"It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance." – Robert F. Kennedy, South Africa, 1966

"Some men see things as they are and ask ‘Why?’ I dream things that never were and ask, ‘Why not?’" – Robert F. Kennedy, 1968

Arlington National Cemetery, a military cemetery directly across the Potomac from Washington, D.c., was established during the Civil War on the grounds of the Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. By 1864, the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria were filled with Union dead. After Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs quickly selected Arlington as a replacement, in part to prevent the Lee’s from ever returning, the government confiscated the land claiming unpaid property taxes. Today, more than 300,000 people, including veterans and military casualties from every one of the nation’s wars, are interred in the 624-acre cemetery administered by the Department of the Navy.

Robert Kiyosaki – The best Home Based Business of The 21st Century

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Video Rating: 4 / 5

Western Union Poster Movie 11×17 Robert Young Randolph Scott Dean Jagger Virginia Gilmore

Western Union Poster Movie 11×17 Robert Young Randolph Scott Dean Jagger Virginia Gilmore

  • Approx. Size: 11 x 17 Inches – 28cm x 44cm
  • Size is provided by the manufacturer and may not be exact
  • The Amazon image in this listing is a digital scan of the poster that you will receive
  • Western Union 11 x 17 Inches Style A Mini Poster
  • Packaged with care and shipped in sturdy reinforced packing material

Western Union reproduction Approx. Size: 11 x 17 Inches – 28cm x 44cm Style A mini poster print

Pop Culture Graphics, Inc is Amazon’s largest source for movie and TV show memorabilia, posters and more: Offering tens of thousands of items to choose from. We also offer a full selection of framed posters..

Customer satisfaction is always guaranteed when you buy from Pop Culture Graphics,Inc

List Price: $ 24.99

Price: $ 7.25

Framed Print of Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia from Robert Harding

Framed Print of Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia from Robert Harding

  • FRAMED PRINT This 14 x11 Framed Print features an image of Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia chosen by Robert Harding. Estimated image size 356x236mm.
  • Black Satin Frame Off-White Digital Mat 14 x11 wooden frame with digital mat and RA4 print. Finished back including brown backing paper, hanging bracket and corner bumpers
  • Image Description: Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia. Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia, United States of America, North America
  • For any queries regarding this image of Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia please contact Robert Harding c/o Media Storehouse quoting Media Reference 3763750
  • Image of Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia is supplied by Robert Harding. © Michael Runkel

14 x11 Framed Print, Black Satin Frame Off-White Digital Mat. showing Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia. Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia, United States of America, North America. Chosen by Robert Harding. 14 x11 wooden frame with digital mat and RA4 print. Finished back including brown backing paper, hanging bracket and corner bumpers. This item is shipped from

List Price: $ 49.99

Price: $ 49.99

Home of Robert Toombs Historical Marker

Home of Robert Toombs Historical Marker
Virginia Union University
Image by J. Stephen Conn
This was the home of Robert Toombs — planter, lawyer and distinguished Southern statesman. Born July 2, 1810, Robert Toombs was educated at Franklin College, Georgia, at Union College, New York, and the University of Virginia. He was a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, 1837-1840, 1842-1845; of the United States Senate from 1853 until his resignation in 1861. He served as Secretary of State, C.S.A., resigning to become a Brigadier General in the Confederate Army. He was a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1877.
Robert Toombs died in this house on December 15, 1885, an "Unreconstructed Rebel." After his death this became the home of his devoted niece, Mrs. Frank Colley. This marker replaces one erected by the Children of the Confederacy of Georgia in June, 1941.

Located at 216 East Robert Toombs Avenue between Polar and Liberty Streets in Washington, Georgia

Photographic Prints of Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia, United from Robert Harding

Photographic Prints of Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia, United from Robert Harding

  • This 10×8 Print features an image chosen by Robert Harding. Estimated image size 254x169mm.
  • High quality RA4 prints. Printed on Kodak Endura and Edge papers. Size refers to paper used
  • Image Description: Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia, United States of America, North America
  • For any queries regarding this item please contact Robert Harding c/o Media Storehouse quoting Media Reference 3763754
  • © Michael Runkel

10×8 Print, Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia, United. Colonial buildings, part of the Military College in Lexington, Virginia, United States of America, North America. Chosen by Robert Harding. High quality RA4 prints. Printed on Kodak Endura and Edge papers. Size refers to paper used. This item is shipped from our American lab.

List Price: $ 15.99

Price: $ 15.99

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite
Virginia Hotels
Image by wallyg
Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy, brother of President John F. Kennedy, former attorney general (1961-1965), United States Senator (1965-1968) and presidential candidate, was shot in the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, following his victory in the California primary and died the next morning. His funeral Mass took place at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York on June 8. The remains were then transported upon a slow-moving train to Washington, D.C., stopping all northbound traffic with many people gathered along the route to pay tribute to Senator Kennedy. The long transport necessitated an evening interment–to date the only to ever take place at Arlintong National Cemetery.

The casket was borne from the train by 13 pallbearers, including former astronaut John Glenn, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, family friend Gen. Maxwell Taylor, Robert’s eldest son Joe and his brother Senator Edward Kennedy. The procession stopped once during the drive to Arlington National Cemetery at the Lincoln Memorial where the Marine Corps Band played "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The funeral motorcade arrived at the cemetery at 10:30 p.m. The brief grave-side service was conducted by Terence Cardinal Cook, Archbishop of Washington. Afterward the folded flag was presented to Ethel and Joe Kennedy in behalf of the United States by John Glenn.

In 1971 a more-elaborate grave site was completed, at the request of the Kennedy family, by architect I.M. Pei. The new grave site retains the simple, white Christian cross of the earlier site, and adds a granite plaza with two inscriptions from Senator Kennedy’s most notable addresses:

"It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance." – Robert F. Kennedy, South Africa, 1966

"Some men see things as they are and ask ‘Why?’ I dream things that never were and ask, ‘Why not?’" – Robert F. Kennedy, 1968

Arlington National Cemetery, a military cemetery directly across the Potomac from Washington, D.c., was established during the Civil War on the grounds of the Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. By 1864, the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria were filled with Union dead. After Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs quickly selected Arlington as a replacement, in part to prevent the Lee’s from ever returning, the government confiscated the land claiming unpaid property taxes. Today, more than 300,000 people, including veterans and military casualties from every one of the nation’s wars, are interred in the 624-acre cemetery administered by the Department of the Navy.

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite
Virginia Hotels
Image by wallyg
Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy, brother of President John F. Kennedy, former attorney general (1961-1965), United States Senator (1965-1968) and presidential candidate, was shot in the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, following his victory in the California primary and died the next morning. His funeral Mass took place at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York on June 8. The remains were then transported upon a slow-moving train to Washington, D.C., stopping all northbound traffic with many people gathered along the route to pay tribute to Senator Kennedy. The long transport necessitated an evening interment–to date the only to ever take place at Arlintong National Cemetery.

The casket was borne from the train by 13 pallbearers, including former astronaut John Glenn, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, family friend Gen. Maxwell Taylor, Robert’s eldest son Joe and his brother Senator Edward Kennedy. The procession stopped once during the drive to Arlington National Cemetery at the Lincoln Memorial where the Marine Corps Band played "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The funeral motorcade arrived at the cemetery at 10:30 p.m. The brief grave-side service was conducted by Terence Cardinal Cook, Archbishop of Washington. Afterward the folded flag was presented to Ethel and Joe Kennedy in behalf of the United States by John Glenn.

In 1971 a more-elaborate grave site was completed, at the request of the Kennedy family, by architect I.M. Pei. The new grave site retains the simple, white Christian cross of the earlier site, and adds a granite plaza with inscriptions from Senator Kennedy’s two most notable addresses:

"It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance." – Robert F. Kennedy, South Africa, 1966

"Some men see things as they are and ask ‘Why?’ I dream things that never were and ask, ‘Why not?’" – Robert F. Kennedy, 1968

Arlington National Cemetery, a military cemetery directly across the Potomac from Washington, D.c., was established during the Civil War on the grounds of the Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. By 1864, the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria were filled with Union dead. After Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs quickly selected Arlington as a replacement, in part to prevent the Lee’s from ever returning, the government confiscated the land claiming unpaid property taxes. Today, more than 300,000 people, including veterans and military casualties from every one of the nation’s wars, are interred in the 624-acre cemetery administered by the Department of the Navy.

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite

Virginia – Arlington National Cemetery: Robert F. Kennedy Gravesite
Virginia Hotels
Image by wallyg
Robert Francis "Bobby" Kennedy, brother of President John F. Kennedy, former attorney general (1961-1965), United States Senator (1965-1968) and presidential candidate, was shot in the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, following his victory in the California primary and died the next morning. His funeral Mass took place at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York on June 8. The remains were then transported upon a slow-moving train to Washington, D.C., stopping all northbound traffic with many people gathered along the route to pay tribute to Senator Kennedy. The long transport necessitated an evening interment–to date the only to ever take place at Arlintong National Cemetery.

The casket was borne from the train by 13 pallbearers, including former astronaut John Glenn, former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, family friend Gen. Maxwell Taylor, Robert’s eldest son Joe and his brother Senator Edward Kennedy. The procession stopped once during the drive to Arlington National Cemetery at the Lincoln Memorial where the Marine Corps Band played "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." The funeral motorcade arrived at the cemetery at 10:30 p.m. The brief grave-side service was conducted by Terence Cardinal Cook, Archbishop of Washington. Afterward the folded flag was presented to Ethel and Joe Kennedy in behalf of the United States by John Glenn.

In 1971 a more-elaborate grave site was completed, at the request of the Kennedy family, by architect I.M. Pei. The new grave site retains the simple, white Christian cross of the earlier site, and adds a granite plaza with inscriptions from Senator Kennedy’s two most notable addresses:

"It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped each time a man stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or strikes out against injustice he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest wall of oppression and resistance." – Robert F. Kennedy, South Africa, 1966

"Some men see things as they are and ask ‘Why?’ I dream things that never were and ask, ‘Why not?’" – Robert F. Kennedy, 1968

Arlington National Cemetery, a military cemetery directly across the Potomac from Washington, D.c., was established during the Civil War on the grounds of the Arlington House, formerly the estate of the family of Robert E. Lee’s wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee, a descendant of Martha Washington. By 1864, the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria were filled with Union dead. After Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs quickly selected Arlington as a replacement, in part to prevent the Lee’s from ever returning, the government confiscated the land claiming unpaid property taxes. Today, more than 300,000 people, including veterans and military casualties from every one of the nation’s wars, are interred in the 624-acre cemetery administered by the Department of the Navy.