Justice Antonin Scalia, The Cambridge Union Society

Date recorded: 09/03/2012 Antonin Scalia, US Supreme Court judge, was born in New Jersey in 1936. He received his LL.B. from Harvard Law School, and was a Sheldon Fellow of Harvard University. Professor of Law at the University of Virginia and the University of Chicago, and Visiting Professor of Law at Georgetown University and Stanford University, Justice Scalia became Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel in the mid-Seventies. He was appointed Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1982. President Reagan nominated him as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and he took his seat in September 1986.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

The Geography of Immigrant Labor Markets: Space, Networks, and Gender (The New Americans: Recent Immigration and American Society)

The Geography of Immigrant Labor Markets: Space, Networks, and Gender (The New Americans: Recent Immigration and American Society)

Parks finds that both spatial and social accessibility matter in connecting immigrants to jobs and that gender saliently shapes immigrant labor markets. She shows how geography sustains labor market segregation among immigrants and points to a reciprocal and reinforcing relationship between ethnic residential segregation and ethnic labor market segregation. This relationship is particularly acute for some immigrant women, possibly stemming from their gendered domestic roles and reliance upon neighborhood- and household-based social networks. The collective results of this study illustrate the importance of household, neighborhood, and geography in shaping the gendered immigrant labor markets of Los Angeles.Parks finds that both spatial and social accessibility matter in connecting immigrants to jobs and that gender saliently shapes immigrant labor markets. She shows how geography sustains labor market segregation among immigrants and points to a reciprocal and reinforcing relationship between ethnic residential segregation and ethnic labor market segregation. This relationship is particularly acute for some immigrant women, possibly stemming from their gendered domestic roles and reliance upon neighborhood- and household-based social networks. The collective results of this study illustrate the importance of household, neighborhood, and geography in shaping the gendered immigrant labor markets of Los Angeles.

List Price: $ 60.00

Price: $ 60.00

The Geography of Immigrant Labor Markets: Space, Networks, and Gender (The New Americans: Recent Immigration and American Society)

The Geography of Immigrant Labor Markets: Space, Networks, and Gender (The New Americans: Recent Immigration and American Society)

Parks finds that both spatial and social accessibility matter in connecting immigrants to jobs and that gender saliently shapes immigrant labor markets. She shows how geography sustains labor market segregation among immigrants and points to a reciprocal and reinforcing relationship between ethnic residential segregation and ethnic labor market segregation. This relationship is particularly acute for some immigrant women, possibly stemming from their gendered domestic roles and reliance upon neighborhood- and household-based social networks. The collective results of this study illustrate the importance of household, neighborhood, and geography in shaping the gendered immigrant labor markets of Los Angeles.

List Price: $ 60.00

Price: $ 44.00