West Baden Springs Hotel

West Baden Springs Hotel
Virginia Hotels
Image by cindy47452
Built in 1902, the hotel was a health spa and resort that capitalized on several mineral springs located on the property. The hotel operated from 1902 until 1932, never recovering from the Wall Street Crash of 1929. It became a Jesuit seminary in 1934 and in 1966 became a branch campus of Northwood Institute. Vacant after 1983, the "Eighth Wonder of the World" slipped into extreme decay, resulting in the collapse of a good portion of the west wall in 1991. In 1992, the National Trust for Historic Preservation listed the hotel as one of America’s most endangered places.

Bill Cook, a Bloomington, Indiana, entrepreneur and billionaire, financed a partial restoration of the property by the Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana which assumed ownership in 1996. It was marketed nationally for almost ten years without a buyer and over 400,000 visitors toured the hotel. In 2006, title was transferred to a subsidiary of Bill Cook’s Cook Group to become a part of the French Lick Resort Casino development. In May 2007, the building began hosting guests as a hotel in 246 luxury rooms for the first time since 1932.

The springs were first found in the late 1700s by a former soldier of the American Revolution who had made a name for himself. In 1852, John Lane built a hotel on the site called the Mile Lick Inn and later changed the name to West Baden Inn. In 1887, the Monon railroad built an extension to take guests to the springs and the hotel. Lee Wiley Sinclair from Salem, Indiana bought the hotel in 1888 and added an opera house, a casino and a two-deck, covered, one-third-mile oval bicycle and pony track. A lighted baseball diamond in the center of the track became the spring training grounds for several major league teams including the Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox, Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates. When that hotel burned in 1901, owner Lee Sinclair declared that the new hotel would be fireproof and would have the world’s largest dome. West Virginia architect Harrison Albright completed the new West Baden Springs Hotel on time.

Prior to the completion of the Houston Astrodome in 1965, the building had the largest free-spanning dome in the United States and was the largest in the world from 1902-1913. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, became a National Historic Landmark in 1987 and is a Historic Civil Engineering Landmark.

Country Inn Hotel at Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

Country Inn Hotel at Berkeley Springs, West Virginia
Virginia Hotels
Image by JPreisler.com
The hotel and site date back to the mid 1800’s when a hotel was first built on the site. The main portion of the current structure dates to the 1930’s and was recently known as the Inn & Spa of Berkeley Springs. The current owners changed the name back to the Country Inn as it was known for three decades.

2407 SW Stonecreek Court Blue Springs, MO, 64015 MLS # 1747893

Lots of space in this 4 bedroom home. Features include: cul-de-sac lot with mature trees, large kitchen, 3 family rooms,finished walkout basement, large dining room, laundry room on main level, deck, patio and more… Stone creek subdivision Blue Springs schools. This is a Fannie Mae HomePath property.This property is approved for HomePathRealty Professionals Heartland LLC would be honored to help you find all Lees Summit, Blue Springs, Lake Lotawana, Lake Tapawingo, Grain Valley, Odessa, Lone Jack, North Kansas City, Gladstone, Raytown, Raymore, Overland Park, Lenexa, Prairie Village, Shawnee, Mission, Brookside, Westport, Country Club Plaza, Mission Hills, Leawood, Gardner, Stilwell, Spring Hill, Platte City, Bucyrus, Lake Quivira, Leavenworth, Lansing, Liberty, Louisburg, Olathe, Paola, Roeland Park, Weatherby Lake, basically any home in the Kansas City Metro area. Investment properties, farms, commercial, industrial, multi family, duplexes, condos, lots, vacant buildings, foreclosures, short sales, lake homes, second homes, any real estate for sale! We will also help with your listings, by using the MLS, YouTube, the RealtyProfessionalsHeartland.com and RPH123.com website, and lots of other creative marketing ideas. Realty Professionals Heartland LLC wants to be your real estate company of choice, no matter if you are a buyer, seller, investor or just someone who is sitting on the fence. We will be there for you! Call today, Realty Professionals Heartland LLC, (816
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07a Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)

07a Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)
Virginia Lawyers
Image by Kansas Sebastian
Palm Springs Historic Landmark No. 34
__________

The Willows Historic Inn, 1924
Dow and Richards
412 W Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs

While looking for a Heineman on Tahquiz Canyon Way, which appears to have been demolished, I turned around to find this lovely Mediterranean Revival Villa. Once the Winter home of New York Lawyer Samuel Untermyer, it is now a charming and lovely inn. Although it’s described as Mediterranean, I initially saw it as Spanish. It just goes to show that style is in the eye of the beholder.

– Kansas Sebastian
__________

Samuel Untermyer (March 6, 1858 – March 16, 1940), also known as Samuel Untermeyer [1] was a Jewish-American lawyer and civic leader as well as a self-made millionaire. He was born in Lynchburg, Virginia but after the death of his father the family moved to New York where he studied law. After admission to the bar, he soon gained fame as a lawyer, focusing on corporate law, and became recognized as a civic leader, frequently attending the Democratic National Convention as a delegate.

Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Untermyer

07b Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)

07b Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)
Virginia Lawyers
Image by Kansas Sebastian
Palm Springs Historic Landmark No. 34
__________

The Willows Historic Inn, 1924
Dow and Richards
412 W Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs

While looking for a Heineman on Tahquiz Canyon Way, which appears to have been demolished, I turned around to find this lovely Mediterranean Revival Villa. Once the Winter home of New York Lawyer Samuel Untermyer, it is now a charming and lovely inn. Although it’s described as Mediterranean, I initially saw it as Spanish. It just goes to show that style is in the eye of the beholder.

– Kansas Sebastian
__________

Samuel Untermyer (March 6, 1858 – March 16, 1940), also known as Samuel Untermeyer [1] was a Jewish-American lawyer and civic leader as well as a self-made millionaire. He was born in Lynchburg, Virginia but after the death of his father the family moved to New York where he studied law. After admission to the bar, he soon gained fame as a lawyer, focusing on corporate law, and became recognized as a civic leader, frequently attending the Democratic National Convention as a delegate.

Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Untermyer

07e Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)

07e Palm Springs – The Willows Historic Inn (E)
Virginia Lawyers
Image by Kansas Sebastian
Palm Springs Historic Landmark No. 34
__________

The Willows Historic Inn, 1924
Dow and Richards
412 W Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs

While looking for a Heineman on Tahquiz Canyon Way, which appears to have been demolished, I turned around to find this lovely Mediterranean Revival Villa. Once the Winter home of New York Lawyer Samuel Untermyer, it is now a charming and lovely inn. Although it’s described as Mediterranean, I initially saw it as Spanish. It just goes to show that style is in the eye of the beholder.

– Kansas Sebastian
__________

Samuel Untermyer (March 6, 1858 – March 16, 1940), also known as Samuel Untermeyer [1] was a Jewish-American lawyer and civic leader as well as a self-made millionaire. He was born in Lynchburg, Virginia but after the death of his father the family moved to New York where he studied law. After admission to the bar, he soon gained fame as a lawyer, focusing on corporate law, and became recognized as a civic leader, frequently attending the Democratic National Convention as a delegate.

Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Untermyer

THE OBAMA SOCIALIST/MARXIST MACHINE SPRINGS INTO ACTION IN WISCONSIN TO DEFEND UNION WORKERS “RIGHTS”

THE OBAMA SOCIALIST/MARXIST MACHINE SPRINGS INTO ACTION IN WISCONSIN TO DEFEND UNION WORKERS “RIGHTS”
Virginia Union University
Image by SS&SS
JUST IMAGINE THE GALL OF THE CONSERVATIVES ASKING US TO PAY FOR SOME OF OUR PENSIONS AND MEDICAL COSTS , WHY THEY’RE TAKING AWAY OUR "RIGHTS"

TAKING AWAY SOME OF YOUR OVERBLOWN SENSE OF ENTITLEMENT MAYBE BUT NOT YOUR RIGHTS

THERE IS NO CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT FOR YOU TO COLLECTIVELY BARGAIN AND IF YOU DON’T LIKE THE RESULTS …………….STRIKE
THEREBY HOLDING THE STATE TAXPAYERS HOSTAGE WHILE YOU DECIDE WHAT YOU’LL BE PAID………………. MORONS
AND IF YOU DON’T LIKE THIS TRY…………………..YOUR FIRED
IT’S ALREADY BEEN DONE ONCE TO THE AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS
YOU CAN HAVE SOME TOO
WISCONSIN IS BROKE
YOU GET IT ……………………………….BROKE, BANKRUPT, KAPUT, NO MORE MONEY FOR YOU ………………………….. AND ASKING YOU TO PAY A SMALL PORTION OF YOUR OWN WAY TO KEEP YOU ALL EMPLOYED IS A SMALL PRICE TO PAY
IF I WAS GOVERNOR I’D FIRE THE BUNCH OF YOU

THERE ARE THOUSANDS OF UNEMPLOYED IN WISCONSIN FROM THE PRIVATE SECTOR WHO LOST THEIR JOBS IN THE LAST TWO YEARS AND WOULD LOVE TO HAVE YOUR JOBS AND PAY A LITTLE OF THEIR OWN WAY
SO STOP LYING AND SAYING YOUR SICK AND GET YOUR COLLECTIVE BUTTS BACK TO WORK
=====================================================================

Obama accused Scott Walker, the state’s new Republican governor, of unleashing an "assault" on unions in pushing emergency legislation that would change future collective-bargaining agreements that affect most public employees, including teachers.

THE PRESIDENTS POLITICAL MACHINE worked in close coordination Thursday with state and national union officials to get thousands of protesters to gather in Madison and to plan similar demonstrations in other state capitals.

Their efforts began to spread, as thousands of labor supporters turned out for a hearing in Columbus, Ohio, to protest a measure from Gov. John Kasich (R) that would cut collective-bargaining rights.

By the end of the day, Democratic Party officials were organizing additional demonstrations in Ohio and Indiana, where an effort is underway to trim benefits for public workers. Some union activists predicted similar protests in Missouri, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Under Walker’s plan, most public workers – excluding police, firefighters and state troopers – would have to pay half of their pension costs and at least 12 percent of their health-care costs. They would lose bargaining rights for anything other than pay. Walker, who took office last month, says the emergency measure would save 0 million over the next two years to help close a .6 billion budget gap.

"Some of what I’ve heard coming out of Wisconsin, where they’re just making it harder for public employees to collectively bargain generally, seems like more of an assault on unions," Obama told a Milwaukee television reporter on Thursday, taking the unusual step of inviting a local TV station into the White House for a sit-down interview. "I think everybody’s got to make some adjustments, but I think it’s also important to recognize that public employees make enormous contributions to our states and our citizens."

The state Capitol sat mostly quiet at dawn on Friday, the calm before another day of furious protests. Scores of protestors lay sleeping in the nooks and crannies of the ornate statehouse, wrapped in blankets and sleeping bags next to piles of empty pizza boxes. They included college students, middle-aged schoolteachers and even a handful of families with their small children.

Room 328, a cramped hearing space where members of the public can speak on the budget bill, was packed full of eager but bleary-eyed protestors. One after another, the speakers used their two minutes to blast Walker’s measure, sometimes looking straight into a local television camera that was broadcasting the proceedings.

"We are the people and our voices must be heard!" one woman said.

The proceedings showed little sign of slowing. By 6:45 a.m., those who had signed up to speak five hours earlier were finally getting their chance.

"We are so thrilled you are here," said Rep. Janis Ringhand, a Democratic state assembly member from Evansville who was moderating the hearing. "We know we are outnumbered as far as votes, but it could be you who makes the difference."
The White House political operation, Organizing for America, got involved Monday, after Democratic National Committee Chairman Timothy M. Kaine, a former Virginia governor, spoke to union leaders in Madison, a party official said.

The group made phone calls, distributed messages via Twitter and Facebook, and sent e-mails to state and national lists to try to build crowds for rallies Wednesday and Thursday, a party official said.

National Republican leaders, who have praised efforts similar to Walker’s, leapt to his defense.

House Speaker John A. Boehner (Ohio) issued a stern rebuke of the White House, calling on Obama to wave off his political operation and stop criticizing the governor.

"This is not the way you begin an ‘adult conversation’ in America about solutions to the fiscal challenges that are destroying jobs in our country," Boehner said in a statement, alluding to the president’s call for civility in budget talks. "Rather than shouting down those in office who speak honestly about the challenges we face, the president and his advisers should lead."

Unsustainable costs

The battle in the states underscores the deep philosophical and political divisions between Obama and Republicans over how to control spending and who should bear the costs.

By aligning himself closely with unions, Obama is siding with a core segment of the Democratic Party base – but one that has chafed in recent weeks as the president has sought to rebuild his image among centrist voters by reaching out to business leaders.

Republicans see a chance to show that they’re willing to make the tough choices to cut spending and to challenge the power of public-sector unions, which are the largest element of the labor movement and regularly raise tens of millions of dollars for Democratic campaigns.

Governors in both parties are slashing once-untouchable programs, including education, health care for the poor and aid to local governments. Some states, such as Illinois, have passed major tax increases.

States face a collective budget deficit of 5 billion through 2013. Many experts say state tax revenue will not fully recover until the nation returns to full employment, which is not likely for several years.

Beyond their short-term fiscal problems, many states face pension and retiree health-care costs that some analysts say are unsustainable. Some states already are curtailing retirement benefits for new employees, although many analysts say it will take much more to bring their long-term obligations in line.

The huge debt burdens coupled with the impending cutoff of federal stimulus aid later this year have spurred talk of a federal bailout. The White House has dismissed such speculation, saying states have the wherewithal to raise taxes, cut programs and renegotiate employee contracts to balance their books.
In Wisconsin, state Democratic senators staged a protest of their own Thursday, refusing to show up at the Capitol for an 11 a.m. quorum call – delaying a vote that would have almost certainly seen the spending cuts pass.
It was unclear where the missing legislators had gone, and several news outlets were reporting that they had left the state.

"I don’t know exactly where they are, but as I understand it, they’re somewhere in Illinois," said Mike Browne, spokesman for Mark Miller, the state Senate’s Democratic leader.

Senate Minority Leader Mark Miller told CNN that they were "in a secure location outside the Capitol."

Republicans hold a 19 to 14 edge in the Senate. They need 20 senators present for a quorum, which is why one of the Democrats has to show up before they can hold the vote.

Democratic legislators in Texas employed a similar tactic in 2003 to try to stop a controversial redistricting plan that gave Republicans more seats in Congress. It passed a couple of months later.

The organized protest at the state Capitol drew an estimated 25,000 people, and long after the quorum call, thousands remained on the grounds, from children in strollers to old ladies in wheelchairs.

Inside the Capitol, the scene late Thursday night was part rock concert, part World Cup match, part high school pep rally and part massive slumber party.

The smell of sweat and pizza drifted through the building’s marbled halls. A drum circle formed inside the massive rotunda, and scores of university students danced jubilantly to the rhythm. There were clanging cowbells and twanging guitars, trumpets and vuvuzelas.

Outside, another throng had gathered to cheer and chant before the television cameras, and to break constantly into the crowd’s favorite anthem: "Kill the bill! Kill the bill!" And everywhere were signs, each with its own dose of disdain for Walker’s budget bill: "Scotty, Scotty, flush your bill down the potty." "Walker’s Plantation, open for business." "You will never break our union."

Many of the protesters, including Laurie Bauer, 51, had been on hand since Tuesday, with no plans to leave until the issue is resolved.

"It’s one thing about the money. We’d be willing to negotiate the money," said Bauer, a library media specialist at Parker High School in Janesville. But "he’s trying to take away our human rights. . . . I don’t want my kids living in a state like that."
Loren Mikkelson, 37, held the same position: Budget cuts are negotiable, but collective -bargaining rights are not.

"We can meet in the middle. We’re willing to give. . . . He’s acting like we’ve never given anything. We’ve given," said Mikkelson, a airfield maintenance worker who said he has endured furloughs and pay cuts in his county job. "We just want a voice."

Implications for Obama

The state-level battles and Obama’s decision to step into the fray illustrate how the budget choices state leaders are facing probably will have direct implications for the president’s political standing.

Wisconsin and Ohio are likely battlegrounds for Obama’s re-election effort. Mobilizing Organizing for America around the budget fights could help kick-start a political machinery that has been largely stagnant since the 2008 campaign and reignite union activists who have expressed some disappointment with Obama.

But by leaping in to defend public workers, the president risks alienating swing voters in those states and nationwide who are sympathetic to GOP governors perceived as taking on special interests to cut spending.

Obama, in his comments to the Wisconsin TV reporter, tried to walk a fine line – noting that he, too, has taken on the unions.

"We had to impose a freeze on pay increases on federal workers for the next two years as part of my overall budget freeze," he said. "I think those kinds of adjustments are the right thing to do."

Walker, meanwhile, called his proposals "modest" and appeared to be trying to show distance between public employees and workers employed by private companies, who he said expressed support for his policies during visits he made to manufacturing plants this week.

"Many of the companies I went by, like so many others across the state, don’t have pensions, and the 401(k)s they have over the last year or two, they’ve had to suspend the employer contribution," Walker told Milwaukee radio station WTMJ. "So, not a lot of sympathy from these guys in private-sector manufacturing companies who I think reflect a lot of the workers in the state who say what we’re asking for is pretty modest."

dennisb@washpost.com wallstenp@washpost.com

VIRGINIA TRIAL LAWYERS ASSOCIATION. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL SEMINAR HELD AT THE HOMESTEAD, HOT SPRINGS, VIRGINIA, MARCH 13, 14, 15, 1975

VIRGINIA TRIAL LAWYERS ASSOCIATION. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL SEMINAR HELD AT THE HOMESTEAD, HOT SPRINGS, VIRGINIA, MARCH 13, 14, 15, 1975

Price:

Civil War Photo (S): Fauquier Sulphur Springs Virginia. Ruins of hotel

Civil War Photo (S): Fauquier Sulphur Springs Virginia. Ruins of hotel

  • Print Size: Approximately 8.5 x 11″.
  • Decorate with history or give a tasteful gift.
  • Only premiere quality framing materials used.
  • Image and passage source: Library of Congress

This is a museum-quality, reproduction print on premium, acid-free, semi gloss paper with archival/UV resistant inks.

Original, c. 1862.

Topics: US History 1861-1865.

HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR PHOTOS

A majority of the Civil War photos come from the original glass plate negatives in the holdings at the Library of Congress. The plates depict the activities both during and immediately following the War (1861-1865). The process of taking photographs during the War was complex and time-consuming. Photographers mixed their own chemicals and prepared their own wet plate glass negatives. The negatives had to be prepared, exposed, and developed within minutes, before the emulsion dried. This was a difficult process to master in a studio setting and even more difficult to work outdoors. Photographers transported their supplies in a wagon, improvised a darkroom, and learned to use their chemicals in both the blistering heat and bitter cold. In the 1880s dry plate negatives were introduced. These glass negatives were commercially available and did not need to be developed immediately after the exposure. (Source: Library of Congress)

Price: $ 24.95

[wprebay kw=”virginia+hotels” num=”36″ ebcat=”-1″] [wprebay kw=”virginia+hotels” num=”37″ ebcat=”-1″]

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