We are traveling to Washington DC in August and what we need is a hotel in or very near DC and a metro station?

Question by Duke89wv: We are traveling to Washington DC in August and what we need is a hotel in or very near DC and a metro station?
We need a hotel that is in DC and close to a metro station if it is in a suburb. We also need it to be fairly reasonable in price less than $ 100/night. Thanks.

Best answer:

Answer by future guy
priceline name your price, lol i got a hotel room for 50 bucks in nyc using name ur own price 🙂 haha

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Implementing a Wide-Area Network at a Naval Air Station: A Stakeholder Analysis

Implementing a Wide-Area Network at a Naval Air Station: A Stakeholder Analysis

This case study illustrates the use of a non-traditional approach to determine the requirements for the Naval Air Systems Team Wide-Area Network (NAVWAN). It is considered to be non-traditional because the case data enable the use of Stakeholder Analysis and SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) assessments to determine the requirements instead of asking functional proponents about function and data requirements.

List Price: $ 15.00

Price: $ 15.00

1160 The Charlottesville Virginia, AMTRAK Station

1160 The Charlottesville Virginia, AMTRAK Station
Virginia Union University
Image by bsabarnowl
History
Charlottesville’s Union Station was constructed in 1885 and sits between the University of Virginia and downtown Charlottesville.
In 1999, Amtrak and the city of Charlottesville dedicated the newly renovated depot following a 0,000 effort.
Amtrak moved out of the original station and into the former Railway Express Agency building built in the 1980s.
The new facility has a more modern waiting area, ticket counter and restroom, as well as better parking lot access and the addition of a full-service restaurant.
One of the unique features of this station is that its two trains serve the station on two separate tracks on either side of the station.
The lines cross just south of the building.

From www.greatamericanstations.com/

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia

Virginian Railway Passenger Station – Roanoke, Virginia
Virginia Western
Image by jebule41
The Virginian Railway Passenger Station, also known as the Virginian Station is a former rail station listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the South Jefferson neighborhood of the independent city of Roanoke, Virginia, U.S.A. Located at the intersection of Jefferson Street SE (VA 116) and Williamson Road, the Virginian Station served as a passenger station for the Virginian Railway between 1910 and 1956.[1] The station was the only station constructed with brick along the entire length of the Virginian’s 608 miles (978 km) network. Severely damaged by fire on January 29, 2001, current plans for its restoration are underway.
History
Standing at the division point between the New River Division and the Norfolk Division of the Virginian Railway, construction commenced on the Virginian Station in September 1909 and was complete by early 1910. Measuring 162 feet (49 m) long by 32 feet (9.8 m) wide, the station consists of a pair of one-story buildings, connected by a covered overhang and features a tile roof, a blond brick facade and terrazzo floors.
Overshadowed by the larger Norfolk & Western Railway, this would serve passengers traveling between West Virginia and Norfolk through 1956 when passenger service was discontinued. By 1959, Virginian would merge with Norfolk & Western, and the former station would be leased out and subsequently operated as a feed and seed store.
By the late 1990s, the station was threated with demolition to make way for an expansion of the Carilion bio-tech campus resulting in its placement on the Roanoke Valley Preservation Foundation’s 2000 list of Most Endangered Sites. Operating as the Depot Country Store, on January 29, 2001, the former station suffered severe damage as a result of a fire. Despite the extensive damage, the station was cited for both its unique design and contribution to the railroad industry in Roanoke, and has been listed on the Virginia Landmarks Register since April 2003 and the National Register of Historic Places since June 2003.
A grass-roots effort to rehabilitate the former station into office space for the Roanoke Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society in addition to additional leaseable office space is underway.

Atlantic Seaboard ‘Megalopolis’ at Night (NASA, International Space Station, 04/06/11)

Atlantic Seaboard ‘Megalopolis’ at Night (NASA, International Space Station, 04/06/11)
Virginia Network
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
A night time view of the Atlantic Seaboard Conurbation, United States of America, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 27 crew member on the International Space Station. As regional metropolitan areas expand in both physical area and population, they typically aggregate to form economically, politically, and to some extent socially linked entities known as conurbations — the term "megalopolis" has also been used. One of the largest conurbations in the world is located along the eastern coastline of the United States, and has been termed the Atlantic Seaboard Conurbation (ASC). The ASC extends over 1,000 kilometers and includes the major economic, governmental, and cultural centers of Boston, Mass.; New York, N.Y.; Philadelphia, Pa.; Baltimore, Md.; and Washington, D.C. This photograph includes every metropolitan area in the ASC except for Boston, Mass. (located off the image to the northeast of New York, N.Y.). The image was taken during "local night", which highlights the position and extent of each metropolitan area along the eastern seaboard by their urban lighting patterns. The establishment and growth of the conurbation was facilitated by transportation networks (railroads, highways, and air travel routes) for transfer of goods, materials, and population between the metropolitan areas. Two other large metropolitan areas are visible in the image — Norfolk, Va. and Richmond, Va. at upper right — but these are not considered to be part of the ASC. In contrast to the city lights that mark metropolitan areas and smaller communities along the sea coast and interior, the Atlantic Ocean appears as a featureless dark region occupying the upper left quarter of the image.

Image credit: NASA

Original image:
spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/station/crew-27/html/…

More about space station research:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

There’s a Flickr group about Space Station Research. Please feel welcome to join! www.flickr.com/groups/stationscience/