West Virginia University School of Nursing makes the move to web-based learning.(Applications): An article from: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

West Virginia University School of Nursing makes the move to web-based learning.(Applications): An article from: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

This digital document is an article from T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), published by T.H.E. Journal, LLC on February 1, 2004. The length of the article is 1118 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: West Virginia University School of Nursing makes the move to web-based learning.(Applications)
Author: Rose Ann DiMaria
Publication: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education) (Refereed)
Date: February 1, 2004
Publisher: T.H.E. Journal, LLC
Volume: 31 Issue: 7 Page: 42(2)

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X connectivity software delivers information to university students’ PCs. (University of Virginia at Charlottesville): An article from: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

X connectivity software delivers information to university students’ PCs. (University of Virginia at Charlottesville): An article from: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

This digital document is an article from T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), published by T.H.E. Journal, LLC on October 1, 1994. The length of the article is 676 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

From the supplier: University of Virginia at Charlottesville has an Academic Computing Center with a network to deliver information to PC desktops throughout the campus. Students have access to a variety of applications, as well as the university library’s online electronic text library and archive. The network uses the X Windowing System to let different platforms share information and applications. The X Window System is a de facto standard for network computing, particularly for UNIX workstations, mainframes and minicomputers. X Windows is contributing to the growth of the Internet, because it provides high-performance Internet access via UNIX hosts. X desktop users can also connect to Xmosaic and other Internet clients running on Unix hosts.

Citation Details
Title: X connectivity software delivers information to university students’ PCs. (University of Virginia at Charlottesville)
Publication: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education) (Refereed)
Date: October 1, 1994
Publisher: T.H.E. Journal, LLC
Volume: v22 Issue: n3 Page: p83(2)

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Software trends in the training of school administrators.: An article from: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education) Reviews

Software trends in the training of school administrators.: An article from: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education)

This digital document is an article from T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), published by T.H.E. Journal, LLC on November 1, 1990. The length of the article is 1556 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

From the supplier: A survey comparing how educational administration program coordinators and faculty that use computers rate the software used by graduate students in 1980 and 1990 shows that all computer applications are considered more essential to know in 1990 than in 1980. The category deemed most important by the respondents is financial applications, which includes accounting, budgeting and spreadsheet software. The second in importance is building-level applications, especially for school principals. This category includes attendance, business software evaluation, report cards, scheduling and student records. The third category is general applications, which includes data base, graphics, integrated software and statistics. The fourth group is communications, including telecommunications and word processing. The fifth group is general office applications, including calendar programs, decision-making simulations, project planning and management programs. The sixth, and last, category is classroom applications, including computer-assisted instruction, courseware evaluations, gradebook programs, interactive video and programming languages.

Citation Details
Title: Software trends in the training of school administrators.
Author: Virginia E. Garland
Publication: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education) (Refereed)
Date: November 1, 1990
Publisher: T.H.E. Journal, LLC
Volume: v18 Issue: n4 Page: p86(3)

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Video network controls students’ screens. (the University of Virginia’s School of Education uses Applied Computer Systems’ LINK screen image projection … (Technological Horizons In Education)

Video network controls students’ screens. (the University of Virginia’s School of Education uses Applied Computer Systems’ LINK screen image projection … (Technological Horizons In Education)

This digital document is an article from T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education), published by T.H.E. Journal, LLC on June 1, 1990. The length of the article is 703 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

From the supplier: The University of Virginia School of Education uses Applied Computer Systems Inc’s LINK video hardware device to project the screen image generated by an instructor’s computer to all cable-attached student monitors. LINK is software independent so it does not take up RAM space, connecting instead between the computer and the monitor at the video port via a daisychain cabling topology. No card slots are used, and only the hardware with the external video port is required; the network created can include any computer that does not have the monitor built into the computer. Instructors are given complete control of the learning environment and can send images to one or all students, receive images from one or all students, clear monitors or freeze keyboards. The system was incorporated into the school’s existing lab that included 12 IBM PC XTs with IBM RGB monitors; the system was later bought by the Academic Computer Center, which has 48 IBM clones with VGA monitors.

Citation Details
Title: Video network controls students’ screens. (the University of Virginia’s School of Education uses Applied Computer Systems’ LINK screen image projection system)
Publication: T H E Journal (Technological Horizons In Education) (Refereed)
Date: June 1, 1990
Publisher: T.H.E. Journal, LLC
Volume: v17 Issue: n10 Page: p40(1)

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