The Deen Show: Did Jesus die for the sins of the world? ( 1 of 2 )

Did Jesus die for the sins of the world? Was He Crucified as a Willing Sacrifice for the Sins of God’s People? Did Jesus die to appease an angry God? According to the Bible, Jesus called upon God to save him. Let this cup pass from me, he pleaded, but no help came.Neither from God or his followers. His last words were, “My God, my God, why hath thou forsaken me”. Those were not the words of a man willing to die. Those were the words of a man wanting to live!! Dr Jerald Dirks is our guest on today’s show, Dr. Dirks received his Bachelor of Arts (philosophy) from Harvard College in 1971, his Master of Divinity from Harvard Divinity School in 1974, his Master of Arts (clinical child psychology) from the University of Denver in 1976, his Doctor of Psychology (Psy.D.) degree in clinical psychology from the University of Denver in 1978, and his sessions program certificate in Islamic studies from Imam Muhammad ibn Saud Islamic University in 1998. In 1969, he obtained his License to Preach from the United Methodist Church and was ordained into the Christian ministry (deaconate) by the United Methodist Church in 1972. He converted to Islam in 1993 and completed the ‘Umrah and Hajj in 1999. His vocational history includes over five years teaching in American colleges and universities and over 20 years spent in the private practice of psychotherapy. In addition, he has taught at the middle school level at two different private Islamic schools and has served as the psychoeducational
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Dr. Strangelove — item 1.. It’s the end of the world as they know it: How growing numbers of American ‘preppers’ are getting ready for Armageddon (by stockpiling food and guns) — 23rd January 2012 …item 5b.. Vera Lynn – “We’ll Meet Again” …

Dr. Strangelove — item 1.. It’s the end of the world as they know it: How growing numbers of American ‘preppers’ are getting ready for Armageddon (by stockpiling food and guns) — 23rd January 2012 …item 5b.. Vera Lynn – “We’ll Meet Again” …
Virginia Network
Image by marsmet524
Conservative talk radio host Glenn Beck seems to preach preppers’ message when he tells listeners: ‘It’s never too late to prepare for the end of the world as we know it.’
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…..item 1)…. Mail Online …. www.dailymail.co.uk/news …. It’s the end of the world as they know it: How growing numbers of American ‘preppers’ are getting ready for Armageddon (by stockpiling food and guns)

By REUTERS REPORTER
Last updated at 8:57 PM on 23rd January 2012

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2090586/Preppers-stockpi…

When Patty Tegeler looks out the window of her home overlooking the Appalachian Mountains in southwestern Virginia, she sees trouble on the horizon.

‘In an instant, anything can happen,’ she told Reuters.

‘And I firmly believe that you have to be prepared.’

Ms Tegeler is among a growing subculture of Americans who refer to themselves informally as ‘preppers.’
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img code photo … Polaris / eyevine ….

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/23/article-2090586-116B79…

Ready for anything: Chuck Izzo, a "prepper" sits in his basement where he stores wood pellets to fuel his woodstove, an alternative heat source in his home

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Some are driven by a fear of imminent societal collapse, others are worried about terrorism, and many have a vague concern that an escalating series of natural disasters is leading to some type of environmental cataclysm.

They are following in the footsteps of hippies in the 1960s who set up communes to separate themselves from what they saw as a materialistic society, and the survivalists in the 1990s who were hoping to escape the dictates of what they perceived as an increasingly secular and oppressive government.

Preppers, though are, worried about no government.

More…

…’I thought I was going to die’: Passengers describe horror as six American Airlines staff are injured by major TURBULENCE

…Introducing the iGrave: The GPS device that lets you track your relative’s coffin

Ms Tegeler, 57, has turned her home in rural Virginia into a ‘survival center,’ complete with a large generator, portable heaters, water tanks, and a two-year supply of freeze-dried food that her sister recently gave her as a birthday present.

She says that in case of emergency, she could survive indefinitely in her home. And she thinks that emergency could come soon.

‘I think this economy is about to fall apart,’ she said.
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img code photo …. New York Times / Redux / eyevine …

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/23/article-2090586-116B79…

Stocking up: Dennis McClung, of Mesa, Arizona, filled his basement with food to ride out the end of civilization, which he believes is coming December 12

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A wide range of vendors market products to preppers, mainly online. They sell everything from water tanks to guns to survival skills.

Conservative talk radio host Glenn Beck seems to preach preppers’ message when he tells listeners: ‘It’s never too late to prepare for the end of the world as we know it.’

‘Unfortunately, given the increasing complexity and fragility of our modern technological society, the chances of a societal collapse are increasing year after year,’ said author James Wesley Rawles, whose
Survival Blog is considered the guiding light of the prepper movement.

A former Army intelligence officer, Mr Rawles has written fiction and non-fiction books on end-of-civilization topics, including ‘How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It,’ which is also known as the preppers’ Bible
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img code photo … MCT via Getty Images …

i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/01/23/article-2090586-116B79…

Emerging market: Best Prices Storable Foods in Texas has seen a surge in customers looking to fill their pantries and basements with nonperishable foods to ride out any fall of civilization

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‘We could see a cascade of higher interest rates, margin calls, stock market collapses, bank runs, currency revaluations, mass street protests, and riots,’ he told Reuters.

‘The worst-case end result would be a Third World War, mass inflation, currency collapses, and long term power grid failures.’

—– HOW TO STOCK UP LIKE A PREPPER

You don’t have to own a fallout shelter and believe society is on the brink of collapse to store some extra supplies in case of a natural disaster or other emergency. Here are a few suggestions from the federal government:

….. Food – Three day supply of non-perishable food that requires no heat or refrigeration and little water to eat. Consider MREs (military rations), peanut butter, canned fruits and vegetables, canned ready-to-eat soup and energy bars. Be sure to include a can opener

….. Water – One gallon per person in your household per day. Keep enough for at least three days.

….. Light – Candles with matches and flashlights with fresh batteries
Communication – Battery-operated on hand-crank radio with NOAA weather radio function

….. Health – First aid kit as well as an prescription and over-the-counter medication you regularly use

….. Sanitation – Spare toilet paper, paper towels and plastic garbage bags

….. Documents – Be sure to keep important documents and family photos together in an easily-accessible place in case you need to leave home

A sense of ‘suffering and being afraid’ is usually at the root of this kind of thinking, according to Cathy Gutierrez, an expert on end-times beliefs at Sweet Briar College in Virginia. Such feelings are not unnatural in a time of economic recession and concerns about a growing national debt, she said.

‘With our current dependence on things from the electric grid to the Internet, things that people have absolutely no control over, there is a feeling that a collapse scenario can easily emerge, with a belief that the end is coming, and it is all out of the individual’s control,’ she told Reuters.

She compared the major technological developments of the past decade to the Industrial Revolution of the 1830s and 1840s, which led to the growth of the Millerites, the 19th-Century equivalent of the preppers.

Followers of charismatic preacher Joseph Miller sold everything and gathered in 1844 for what they believed would be the second coming of Jesus Christ.

Many of today’s preppers receive inspiration from the Internet, devouring information posted on websites like that run by attorney Michael T. Snider, who writes The Economic Collapse blog out of his home in northern Idaho.

‘Modern preppers are much different from the survivalists of the old days,’ he said.

‘You could be living next door to a prepper and never even know it. Many suburbanites are turning spare rooms into food pantries and are going for survival training on the weekends.’

Like other preppers, Mr Snider is worried about the end of a functioning US economy. He points out that tens of millions of Americans are on food stamps and that many U.S. children are living in poverty.

‘Most people have a gut feeling that something has gone terribly wrong, but that doesn’t mean that they understand what is happening,’ he said.

‘A lot of Americans sense that a massive economic storm is coming and they want to be prepared for it.’

So, assuming there is no collapse of society — which the preppers call ‘uncivilization’ — what is the future of the preppers?

Ms Gutierrez said that unlike the Millerites — or followers of radio preacher Harold Camping, who predicted the world would end last year — preppers are not setting a date for the coming destruction. The Mayan Calendar predicts doom this December.

‘The minute you set a date, you are courting disconfirmation,’ she said.

Ms Tegeler, who recalls being hit by tornadoes and floods in her southwestern Virginia home, said that none of her ‘survival center’ products will go to waste.

‘I think it’s silly not to be prepared," she said.

‘After all, anything can happen.’

Share this article
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…..item 2a)..,, web-link … Official Countdown Timer … Time until Friday, December 21, 2012 at 11:11:11 AM (GMT time).

What time would 11:11 GMT be where I live?
I put this time zone conversion chart together to show what time it will be in other parts of the world at exactly 11:11 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

www.december212012.com/CDC.htm

Our countdown timer has been carefully calculated and verified to be accurate right down to the very last second.

Add our Official December 21 2012 Countdown clock to your website, blog, MySpace page, Facebook wall, or other social networking site.

To add our Official Countdown Clock, simply copy the code below and paste it on your site, blog or social networking page.
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…..item 2b)…. website … time and date.com … Customized Counter

Time until Friday, December 21, 2012 at 11:11:11 AM (UTC time)

www.timeanddate.com/counters/customcounter.html?month=12&….
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…..item 3)…. youtube video … Everything 2012 Earth Changes Part 2 of 3 … 9:54 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=jT4hrd6To2k&feature=related
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…..item 4)…. youtube video … Dr. Strangelove trailer … 1:38 minutes …

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gXY3kuDvSU

Uploaded by scarface584 on Jun 5, 2007

This is the trailer of the classic Stanley Kubrick film, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.

Category:
Entertainment

Tags:
dr. strangelove trailer Stanley Kubrick film peter sellers sterling hayden war comedy funny

License:
Standard YouTube License
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…..item 5a)…. youtube video … End of Strangelove … 4:18 minutes

www.youtube.com/watch?v=iSZJbJ4Mfis&feature=related

Uploaded by cmek1989 on Jul 20, 2008

End of Dr. Strangelove

Category:
Entertainment

Tags:
nuclear

License:
Standard YouTube License
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…..item 5b)…. youtube video … Dr. Strangelove … 1:58 minutes

www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxrWz9XVvls

Ending of Dr. Strangelove, one of the best movies ever made.

Vera Lynn – "We’ll Meet Again"

We’ll meet again,
Don’t know where,
Don’t know when
But I know we’ll meet again some sunny day
Keep smiling through,
Just like you always do
Till the blue skies drive the dark clouds far away

So will you please say "Hello"
To the folks that I know
Tell them I won’t be long
They’ll be happy to know
That as you saw me go
I was singing this song

We’ll meet again,
Don’t know where,
Don’t know when
But I know we’ll meet again some sunny day

Category:
Entertainment

Tags:
Strangelove Comedy DrStrangelove some sunny day nuclear bomb Führer Fuhrer Vera Lynn

License:
Standard YouTube License
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“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the exhibit "The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary," on display in the third floor rotunda gallery of Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. The exhibit was curated by students in Jody Allen’s "World of Henry Billups" class and the Special Collections Research Center staff. The exhibit will be on display from April 28-November 7, 2011.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

Jim Crow in the Williamsburg Area was curated by Kellie O’Malley, Elliott Perkins, and Amanda Reynolds.

Jim Crow in the Williamsburg Area

After the Civil War, the United States was fraught with racial divisions, and Williamsburg was not exempt from these tenuous conditions. During the first half of the twentieth century Jim Crow laws played a strong role in the Williamsburg community. The purpose of this case is to demonstrate the effects of Jim Crow in the Williamsburg area through black and white perspectives.

Marilyn Kaemmerle Editorial

In 1945, Marilyn Kaemmerle was a senior at the College of William & Mary, and editor of the Flat Hat, a student-run newspaper. In the February 7th edition of the Flat Hat Kaemmerle wrote an unattributed editorial titled, “Lincoln’s Job Half-Done.” Kaemmerle argued that although blacks were formally free by law, they were not equal. The release of this editorial caused a massive reaction that spread much further than the William & Mary campus. In response to Kaemmerle’s editorial, newspapers nationwide published articles, editorials and letters to the editor. The William & Mary Board of Visitors removed Kaemmerle from her position as editor of the Flat Hat instituting a policy of student censorship. In 1980, the Board of Visitors issued a formal apology to Marilyn Kaemmerle for her removal as Flat Hat editor. The Flat Hat, February 7, 1945.

The included clippings are articles and editorials from newspapers surrounding the Williamsburg area. The opinions of these editorials range from positive to negative and show the conflicted emotions Marilyn Kaemmerle’s editorial aroused in the community.

Various Newspaper Articles, Marilyn Kaemmerle Collection, 1945.

Photograph of Marilyn Kaemmerle on campus prior to the publication of her editorial “Lincoln’s Job Half-Done.”

Photograph, Marilyn Kaemmerle Collection, circa 1945.

Herman Recht was a lawyer turned Navy yeoman stationed at Camp Peary from October 1943 until February 1946. Recht’s wife Esther lived in Pennsylvania at the time. Recht was well educated and often came into Williamsburg to eat at the Williamsburg Lodge or borrow books from the William and Mary Library. One of the letters that Recht wrote to his wife highlighted the Kaemmerle incident. Recht met with Kaemmerle and a fellow sorority sister at their sorority house and they discussed the editorial. Recht wrote to Esther on twenty-fourth of February, 1945, sharing his opinion of Marilyn and describes of the community’s response. Recht’s knowledge of the editorial showed the scope of the scandal it caused. This incident was not a topic of community conversation. Although Recht was not originally from the Williamsburg area, while stationed in Camp Peary he made an effort to involve himself within the community. Recht’s response to Kaemmerle showed his interest to understand the situation; this response was not entirely atypical but there were many in the community that were upset about the editorial.

Herman Recht to Esther Recht, Herman Recht Papers, February 24, 1945.
Purchase.

Interview with Reverend Junius Moody

The Reverend Junius Moody was a teacher at Bruton Heights School and a pastor of New Zion Baptist Church. He came to live in Williamsburg in 1926 and taught in James City County for 30 years. He also served as chairman of the board and treasurer of the Community Action Agency. In this interview, the Reverend Moody remembers segregation in Williamsburg during the Jim Crow Era. He recalls the experience of segregation and its effects on black children. He also speaks about segregated train cars and schools. The Reverend Moody gave this interview on July 31, 1984.

Interview with Reverend Junius Moody, James City County Oral History Collection, July 31, 1984.

[Miss] W. T. Austin, Williamsburg, Virginia to Dr. Taylor, Williamsburg Virginia. Office of the President, Lyon G. Tyler, June 19, 1913.

Reproduction of a photograph of the Frontiers, Williamsburg Reunion Collection, 2010.

Photograph of Bruton Heights School
Exterior View of Bruton Heights School, black and white print. Visual Resources Collection, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library. Courtesy of The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. Image # 1968-CK-623.

Williamsburg Voting Registries, White and Colored

While the 15th amendment granted all men the right to vote, by 1902 in Virginia most black men had lost this right. Voting records kept during the Jim Crow era exemplify the clearly racist policies present during the first half of the twentieth century. Votes made by white and black citizens were recorded in separate books. By juxtaposing the two record books, dissimilarities such as the disparity in number of voters and employment status, are easy to see.

Williamsburg Office of the Registrar Records, 1900-1963.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the exhibit "The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary," on display in the third floor rotunda gallery of Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. The exhibit was curated by students in Jody Allen’s "World of Henry Billups" class and the Special Collections Research Center staff. The exhibit will be on display from April 28-November 7, 2011.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

Creating a Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era was curated by Jerome Carter, Sebastian Kreindel, Andrew Ojeda, and Blair Smith.

Speaking of Black…, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, April 1977.

The newsletter presented in this case entitled Speaking of Black… was published in 1977 by the Black Student Organization (B.S.O.). Dr. Warren Buck founded the B.S.O. in 1969 for the purpose of raising awareness about African-Americans at the College of William & Mary and offering assistance to blacks adjusting to student life. Through the newsletter the B.S.O. attempted to provide a voice for African-American students whom often felt isolated in a community lacking diversity. The student published document also discussed black issues on campus and the role of black students within the college, including an editorial by Isiah Parnell expressing his opinions regarding the potential success of the B.S.O. The printing of the names of incoming black freshmen in the newsletter, further demonstrated the B.S.O.’s effort to create a positive and supportive community for black students. This newsletter sheds light on black student life at William and Mary during the 1970’s.

Pamphlets and Booklets from Black Student Groups

These additional documents, from a few black student groups, demonstrate the involvement of African-Americans in campus organizations and their attempt to encourage potential black students to attend William & Mary. Each pamphlet or booklet provides a unique view of black student organizations at the College, emphasizing their efforts to recruit black students.

Involved: Black Student Organization, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Law Study…at William and Mary, The Black American Law Students Association Inc.: Marshall-Wythe Chapter, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

The Changing Scene at the College of William and Mary, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Creating A Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era

In the late 1970s there were African American women at the College of William & Mary who felt that their needs were not being met; in response, Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated was chartered on February 7, 1976. The charter members are pictured here.

Scrapbook pages, Reproduction of original owned by Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated, 1982.
Colonial Echo, 1976.
News Clippings, “Students—Minorities” in University Archives Subject File Collection, 1976, 1986, 1988.

During the 1973-1974 school year, efforts were made to charter an African American fraternity at the College of William & Mary. The next year Willie G. Wedd-Walton (an undergraduate), working with Brother Wendell T. Foster, of the Beta Gamma Lambda Graduate Chapter in Richmond, paved the way to charter the Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. on campus. The College, initially hesitant to allow an African American fraternity on campus, was persuaded by the advocacy of Sam Sadler, Vice President for Student Affairs. On Saturday, May 31, 1975, the Kappa Pi Chapter was chartered and the light of Alpha was brought to the College of William & Mary. Since that day, Kappa Pi has provided a refuge and support system for its members and the College’s African American community.

Brother William (Bill) Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.’s Alpha Shield, Spring 1975.

Loan of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. at the National Convention in Atlanta, 1977.
Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

"To the youths who march onward and upward towards the light this volume is respectfully dedicated." Dedication in A Development in College Life: The History of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. by Charles H. Wesley, Ph.D. (1925; 2000 edition).

The Alpha Phi Alpha photograph collage was created by curator Jerome Carter ’12.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Charter, 1975.

The Charter Line was called Ila A Koko
Bro. Timothy Ernest Allmond, Jr.
Bro. Nathaniel Adeoluwa Folarin
Bro. William Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.
Bro. Sheldon Jerome Johnson
Bro. John Oscar Little, Jr.
Bro. Adeyemo Folusho Olanrewaju
Bro. Ronald Harvey Smoot
Bro. Willie George Webb-Walton

Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Alpha Chapter’s Charter, circa 1930s.

The Alpha Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. was founded on Tuesday, December 4, 1906 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. This is a replacement of Alpha chapter’s original charter, since the original charter was misplaced. This charter was created in the 1930’s.

Reproduction courtesy of the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

In 1975 forty-seven of the eighty minority students at the College of William & Mary were surveyed to get their opinions regarding the College – faculty, administration, other students – and its treatment of minority students. The responses to these questions are shown here. This report, composed by Leroy Moore, head of the Office of Minority Student Affairs, presents the “very depressing” statistical evidence of discontent and mistreatment of minority students at the College. Indeed, the results showed that students felt that they were unwanted by the community, treated unfairly by faculty, and subjected to an insensitive administration. Tellingly, “74% of the respondents would not return, if given the opportunity”. Ultimately with help from the Office of Minority Student Affairs, and collaborations of student groups such as the Black Student Organization with the President of the College at the time, Thomas A. Graves, Jr., progress was made toward bettering the experience of the College’s minority students.
Survey Report, Office of Minority Student Affairs, 1975.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the exhibit "The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary," on display in the third floor rotunda gallery of Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. The exhibit was curated by students in Jody Allen’s "World of Henry Billups" class and the Special Collections Research Center staff. The exhibit will be on display from April 28-November 7, 2011.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

Creating a Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era was curated by Jerome Carter, Sebastian Kreindel, Andrew Ojeda, and Blair Smith.

Speaking of Black…, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, April 1977.

The newsletter presented in this case entitled Speaking of Black… was published in 1977 by the Black Student Organization (B.S.O.). Dr. Warren Buck founded the B.S.O. in 1969 for the purpose of raising awareness about African-Americans at the College of William & Mary and offering assistance to blacks adjusting to student life. Through the newsletter the B.S.O. attempted to provide a voice for African-American students whom often felt isolated in a community lacking diversity. The student published document also discussed black issues on campus and the role of black students within the college, including an editorial by Isiah Parnell expressing his opinions regarding the potential success of the B.S.O. The printing of the names of incoming black freshmen in the newsletter, further demonstrated the B.S.O.’s effort to create a positive and supportive community for black students. This newsletter sheds light on black student life at William and Mary during the 1970’s.

Pamphlets and Booklets from Black Student Groups

These additional documents, from a few black student groups, demonstrate the involvement of African-Americans in campus organizations and their attempt to encourage potential black students to attend William & Mary. Each pamphlet or booklet provides a unique view of black student organizations at the College, emphasizing their efforts to recruit black students.

Involved: Black Student Organization, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Law Study…at William and Mary, The Black American Law Students Association Inc.: Marshall-Wythe Chapter, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

The Changing Scene at the College of William and Mary, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Creating A Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era

In the late 1970s there were African American women at the College of William & Mary who felt that their needs were not being met; in response, Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated was chartered on February 7, 1976. The charter members are pictured here.

Scrapbook pages, Reproduction of original owned by Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated, 1982.
Colonial Echo, 1976.
News Clippings, “Students—Minorities” in University Archives Subject File Collection, 1976, 1986, 1988.

During the 1973-1974 school year, efforts were made to charter an African American fraternity at the College of William & Mary. The next year Willie G. Wedd-Walton (an undergraduate), working with Brother Wendell T. Foster, of the Beta Gamma Lambda Graduate Chapter in Richmond, paved the way to charter the Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. on campus. The College, initially hesitant to allow an African American fraternity on campus, was persuaded by the advocacy of Sam Sadler, Vice President for Student Affairs. On Saturday, May 31, 1975, the Kappa Pi Chapter was chartered and the light of Alpha was brought to the College of William & Mary. Since that day, Kappa Pi has provided a refuge and support system for its members and the College’s African American community.

Brother William (Bill) Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.’s Alpha Shield, Spring 1975.

Loan of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. at the National Convention in Atlanta, 1977.
Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

"To the youths who march onward and upward towards the light this volume is respectfully dedicated." Dedication in A Development in College Life: The History of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. by Charles H. Wesley, Ph.D. (1925; 2000 edition).

The Alpha Phi Alpha photograph collage was created by curator Jerome Carter ’12.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Charter, 1975.

The Charter Line was called Ila A Koko
Bro. Timothy Ernest Allmond, Jr.
Bro. Nathaniel Adeoluwa Folarin
Bro. William Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.
Bro. Sheldon Jerome Johnson
Bro. John Oscar Little, Jr.
Bro. Adeyemo Folusho Olanrewaju
Bro. Ronald Harvey Smoot
Bro. Willie George Webb-Walton

Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Alpha Chapter’s Charter, circa 1930s.

The Alpha Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. was founded on Tuesday, December 4, 1906 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. This is a replacement of Alpha chapter’s original charter, since the original charter was misplaced. This charter was created in the 1930’s.

Reproduction courtesy of the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

In 1975 forty-seven of the eighty minority students at the College of William & Mary were surveyed to get their opinions regarding the College – faculty, administration, other students – and its treatment of minority students. The responses to these questions are shown here. This report, composed by Leroy Moore, head of the Office of Minority Student Affairs, presents the “very depressing” statistical evidence of discontent and mistreatment of minority students at the College. Indeed, the results showed that students felt that they were unwanted by the community, treated unfairly by faculty, and subjected to an insensitive administration. Tellingly, “74% of the respondents would not return, if given the opportunity”. Ultimately with help from the Office of Minority Student Affairs, and collaborations of student groups such as the Black Student Organization with the President of the College at the time, Thomas A. Graves, Jr., progress was made toward bettering the experience of the College’s minority students.
Survey Report, Office of Minority Student Affairs, 1975.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the exhibit "The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary," on display in the third floor rotunda gallery of Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. The exhibit was curated by students in Jody Allen’s "World of Henry Billups" class and the Special Collections Research Center staff. The exhibit will be on display from April 28-November 7, 2011.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

Creating a Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era was curated by Jerome Carter, Sebastian Kreindel, Andrew Ojeda, and Blair Smith.

Speaking of Black…, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, April 1977.

The newsletter presented in this case entitled Speaking of Black… was published in 1977 by the Black Student Organization (B.S.O.). Dr. Warren Buck founded the B.S.O. in 1969 for the purpose of raising awareness about African-Americans at the College of William & Mary and offering assistance to blacks adjusting to student life. Through the newsletter the B.S.O. attempted to provide a voice for African-American students whom often felt isolated in a community lacking diversity. The student published document also discussed black issues on campus and the role of black students within the college, including an editorial by Isiah Parnell expressing his opinions regarding the potential success of the B.S.O. The printing of the names of incoming black freshmen in the newsletter, further demonstrated the B.S.O.’s effort to create a positive and supportive community for black students. This newsletter sheds light on black student life at William and Mary during the 1970’s.

Pamphlets and Booklets from Black Student Groups

These additional documents, from a few black student groups, demonstrate the involvement of African-Americans in campus organizations and their attempt to encourage potential black students to attend William & Mary. Each pamphlet or booklet provides a unique view of black student organizations at the College, emphasizing their efforts to recruit black students.

Involved: Black Student Organization, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Law Study…at William and Mary, The Black American Law Students Association Inc.: Marshall-Wythe Chapter, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

The Changing Scene at the College of William and Mary, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Creating A Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era

In the late 1970s there were African American women at the College of William & Mary who felt that their needs were not being met; in response, Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated was chartered on February 7, 1976. The charter members are pictured here.

Scrapbook pages, Reproduction of original owned by Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated, 1982.
Colonial Echo, 1976.
News Clippings, “Students—Minorities” in University Archives Subject File Collection, 1976, 1986, 1988.

During the 1973-1974 school year, efforts were made to charter an African American fraternity at the College of William & Mary. The next year Willie G. Wedd-Walton (an undergraduate), working with Brother Wendell T. Foster, of the Beta Gamma Lambda Graduate Chapter in Richmond, paved the way to charter the Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. on campus. The College, initially hesitant to allow an African American fraternity on campus, was persuaded by the advocacy of Sam Sadler, Vice President for Student Affairs. On Saturday, May 31, 1975, the Kappa Pi Chapter was chartered and the light of Alpha was brought to the College of William & Mary. Since that day, Kappa Pi has provided a refuge and support system for its members and the College’s African American community.

Brother William (Bill) Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.’s Alpha Shield, Spring 1975.

Loan of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. at the National Convention in Atlanta, 1977.
Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

"To the youths who march onward and upward towards the light this volume is respectfully dedicated." Dedication in A Development in College Life: The History of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. by Charles H. Wesley, Ph.D. (1925; 2000 edition).

The Alpha Phi Alpha photograph collage was created by curator Jerome Carter ’12.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Charter, 1975.

The Charter Line was called Ila A Koko
Bro. Timothy Ernest Allmond, Jr.
Bro. Nathaniel Adeoluwa Folarin
Bro. William Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.
Bro. Sheldon Jerome Johnson
Bro. John Oscar Little, Jr.
Bro. Adeyemo Folusho Olanrewaju
Bro. Ronald Harvey Smoot
Bro. Willie George Webb-Walton

Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Alpha Chapter’s Charter, circa 1930s.

The Alpha Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. was founded on Tuesday, December 4, 1906 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. This is a replacement of Alpha chapter’s original charter, since the original charter was misplaced. This charter was created in the 1930’s.

Reproduction courtesy of the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

In 1975 forty-seven of the eighty minority students at the College of William & Mary were surveyed to get their opinions regarding the College – faculty, administration, other students – and its treatment of minority students. The responses to these questions are shown here. This report, composed by Leroy Moore, head of the Office of Minority Student Affairs, presents the “very depressing” statistical evidence of discontent and mistreatment of minority students at the College. Indeed, the results showed that students felt that they were unwanted by the community, treated unfairly by faculty, and subjected to an insensitive administration. Tellingly, “74% of the respondents would not return, if given the opportunity”. Ultimately with help from the Office of Minority Student Affairs, and collaborations of student groups such as the Black Student Organization with the President of the College at the time, Thomas A. Graves, Jr., progress was made toward bettering the experience of the College’s minority students.
Survey Report, Office of Minority Student Affairs, 1975.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit

“The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary” Exhibit
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the exhibit "The World of Henry Billups: Jim Crow at the College of William and Mary," on display in the third floor rotunda gallery of Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. The exhibit was curated by students in Jody Allen’s "World of Henry Billups" class and the Special Collections Research Center staff. The exhibit will be on display from April 28-November 7, 2011.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

Creating a Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era was curated by Jerome Carter, Sebastian Kreindel, Andrew Ojeda, and Blair Smith.

Speaking of Black…, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, April 1977.

The newsletter presented in this case entitled Speaking of Black… was published in 1977 by the Black Student Organization (B.S.O.). Dr. Warren Buck founded the B.S.O. in 1969 for the purpose of raising awareness about African-Americans at the College of William & Mary and offering assistance to blacks adjusting to student life. Through the newsletter the B.S.O. attempted to provide a voice for African-American students whom often felt isolated in a community lacking diversity. The student published document also discussed black issues on campus and the role of black students within the college, including an editorial by Isiah Parnell expressing his opinions regarding the potential success of the B.S.O. The printing of the names of incoming black freshmen in the newsletter, further demonstrated the B.S.O.’s effort to create a positive and supportive community for black students. This newsletter sheds light on black student life at William and Mary during the 1970’s.

Pamphlets and Booklets from Black Student Groups

These additional documents, from a few black student groups, demonstrate the involvement of African-Americans in campus organizations and their attempt to encourage potential black students to attend William & Mary. Each pamphlet or booklet provides a unique view of black student organizations at the College, emphasizing their efforts to recruit black students.

Involved: Black Student Organization, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Law Study…at William and Mary, The Black American Law Students Association Inc.: Marshall-Wythe Chapter, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

The Changing Scene at the College of William and Mary, The Black Student Organization, Student Organizations Collection, circa 1970s.

Creating A Space: Black Student Organizations in the Post-Jim Crow Era

In the late 1970s there were African American women at the College of William & Mary who felt that their needs were not being met; in response, Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated was chartered on February 7, 1976. The charter members are pictured here.

Scrapbook pages, Reproduction of original owned by Mu Upsilon Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated, 1982.
Colonial Echo, 1976.
News Clippings, “Students—Minorities” in University Archives Subject File Collection, 1976, 1986, 1988.

During the 1973-1974 school year, efforts were made to charter an African American fraternity at the College of William & Mary. The next year Willie G. Wedd-Walton (an undergraduate), working with Brother Wendell T. Foster, of the Beta Gamma Lambda Graduate Chapter in Richmond, paved the way to charter the Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. on campus. The College, initially hesitant to allow an African American fraternity on campus, was persuaded by the advocacy of Sam Sadler, Vice President for Student Affairs. On Saturday, May 31, 1975, the Kappa Pi Chapter was chartered and the light of Alpha was brought to the College of William & Mary. Since that day, Kappa Pi has provided a refuge and support system for its members and the College’s African American community.

Brother William (Bill) Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.’s Alpha Shield, Spring 1975.

Loan of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. at the National Convention in Atlanta, 1977.
Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

"To the youths who march onward and upward towards the light this volume is respectfully dedicated." Dedication in A Development in College Life: The History of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. by Charles H. Wesley, Ph.D. (1925; 2000 edition).

The Alpha Phi Alpha photograph collage was created by curator Jerome Carter ’12.

The Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Charter, 1975.

The Charter Line was called Ila A Koko
Bro. Timothy Ernest Allmond, Jr.
Bro. Nathaniel Adeoluwa Folarin
Bro. William Lorenzo Jackson, Jr.
Bro. Sheldon Jerome Johnson
Bro. John Oscar Little, Jr.
Bro. Adeyemo Folusho Olanrewaju
Bro. Ronald Harvey Smoot
Bro. Willie George Webb-Walton

Reproduction courtesy of Kappa Pi Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Alpha Chapter’s Charter, circa 1930s.

The Alpha Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. was founded on Tuesday, December 4, 1906 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. This is a replacement of Alpha chapter’s original charter, since the original charter was misplaced. This charter was created in the 1930’s.

Reproduction courtesy of the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library.

In 1975 forty-seven of the eighty minority students at the College of William & Mary were surveyed to get their opinions regarding the College – faculty, administration, other students – and its treatment of minority students. The responses to these questions are shown here. This report, composed by Leroy Moore, head of the Office of Minority Student Affairs, presents the “very depressing” statistical evidence of discontent and mistreatment of minority students at the College. Indeed, the results showed that students felt that they were unwanted by the community, treated unfairly by faculty, and subjected to an insensitive administration. Tellingly, “74% of the respondents would not return, if given the opportunity”. Ultimately with help from the Office of Minority Student Affairs, and collaborations of student groups such as the Black Student Organization with the President of the College at the time, Thomas A. Graves, Jr., progress was made toward bettering the experience of the College’s minority students.
Survey Report, Office of Minority Student Affairs, 1975.

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Bilderberg 2012: Protesters vs New World Order

Around 150 of the world’s elite approached the grounds of a suburban Virginia hotel on Thursday for the first day of the 2012 Bilderberg Conference, but also on hand were throngs of protesters who gathered to opposed the top-secret gathering. Journalists and critics of the annual clandestine conference stationed themselves outside of a Chantilly, Virginia Marriott hotel near Washington, DC early Thursday to catch a glimpse of the government officials, entrepreneurs and other assorted members of the privileged elite who had gathered for this year’s event. Subscribe to RT! www.youtube.com Watch RT LIVE on our website rt.com Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com Follow us on Twitter twitter.com Follow us on Google+ plus.google.com RT (Russia Today) is a global news network broadcasting from Moscow and Washington studios. RT is the first news channel to break the 500 million YouTube views benchmark.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

The World Federation of Neuroscience Nursing: a global network of caring.: An article from: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

The World Federation of Neuroscience Nursing: a global network of caring.: An article from: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

This digital document is an article from Journal of Neuroscience Nursing, published by Thomson Gale on December 1, 2005. The length of the article is 502 words. The page length shown above is based on a typical 300-word page. The article is delivered in HTML format and is available in your Amazon.com Digital Locker immediately after purchase. You can view it with any web browser.

Citation Details
Title: The World Federation of Neuroscience Nursing: a global network of caring.
Author: Virginia Prendergast
Publication: Journal of Neuroscience Nursing (Magazine/Journal)
Date: December 1, 2005
Publisher: Thomson Gale
Volume: 37 Issue: 6 Page: 299(1)

Distributed by Thomson Gale

List Price: $ 5.95

Price: $ 5.95

Have you ever felt left out of the World Jewish Conspiracy?

Question by : Have you ever felt left out of the World Jewish Conspiracy?
I do, because I’m not Jewish, but I wonder if there are any Jews out there who feel that way. Personally, I feel really left out of the Ivy League good old boy network AND the West Virginia good old boy network. I mean, my great grandfather was a sheriff’s deputy and shot at miners during the Blair Mountain Mine War. I should get something out of that, right?

Best answer:

Answer by A. Banana
Um… What?

Give your answer to this question below!