GEORGE WYTHE, LL.D. (1893)

GEORGE WYTHE, LL.D. (1893)
Virginia Lawyers
Image by William & Mary Law Library
MEMBER OF THE CONTINENTAL CONGRESS, SIGNER OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, MEMBER OF THE COMMITTEE OF 1779 ON REVISION OF THE LAWS OF VIRGINIA, JUDGE OF THE CHANCERY COURT, FIRST PROFESSOR OF LAW IN THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM & MARY. THE AMERICAN ARISTIDES. HE WAS AN EXEMPLAR OF ALL THAT IS NOBLE AND ELEVATING IN THE PROFESSION OF THE LAW
AD 1893
THIS TABLET IS ERECTED BY THE VIRGINIA BAR ASSOCIATION IN TRIBUTE TO HIS COURAGE AS A PATRIOT, HIS ABILITY AS AN INSTRUCTOR, HIS UPRIGHTNESS AS A LAWYER, HIS PURITY AS A JUDGE.

George Wythe, LL.D.

George Wythe, LL.D.
Virginia Lawyers
Image by William & Mary Law Library
1726-1806
Member of the Continental Congress, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Member of the Committee of 1779 on the Revision of the Laws of VIRGINIA, Judge of the Chancery Court, First Professor of Law in the College of William and Mary. The American Aristides. He was an Exemplar of all that is Noble and Elevating in the Profession of the Law.

Erected as a tribute to His Courage as a Patriot, His Ability as an Instructor, His Uprightness as a Lawyer, His Purity as a Judge.

The original Tablet was presented by the Virginia State Bar Association in 1893.

(Located in the Wren Chapel.)

The Wythe House.

The Wythe House.
Virginia Lawyers
Image by lori05871
One of the most influential men of the Revolutionary era, George Wythe ranks among colonial America’s finest lawyers, legal scholars, and teachers. Among the young men Wythe trained in the law were Thomas Jefferson, St. George Tucker, and John Marshall. He probably did more to shape Thomas Jefferson’s ideas than any other man. Jefferson referred to Wythe as "my faithful and beloved Mentor in youth, and my most affectionate friend through life." In 1779, Wythe joined the College of William & Mary faculty to become the first law professor in the United States. George Wythe opposed slavery in principle and freed some of his slaves during his lifetime. He taught at least two of his slaves to read. Today, the home has been furnished to look as it might have when George and Elizabeth Wythe resided in it.