The Power to Overcome Disability, from Sheltering Arms

The story of Jamaal Williams, a former Virginia Union University football player and patient at Sheltering Arms ( www.shelteringarms.com ), Central Virginia’s premier physical rehabilitation healthcare provider. After a stroke, Mr. Williams was unable to speak or move half of his body. The video tells the story of his struggle to overcome his disabilities and demonstrates some of the technologies used in his therapy, including the RIO robotic trainer.
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50th Anniversary Christopher Newport University.mov

“It’s something special, something that most cities simply dream of having within their boundaries, and although young compared to others- it has matured beyond what we could have ever imagined, not to mention built a reputation for itself that has helped to promote its popularity worldwide- as Christopher Newport University proudly celebrates 50 years of contributing to the richness of our community and offering up a 21st century learning environment for the future leaders of tomorrow . . .”

Justice Antonin Scalia, The Cambridge Union Society

Date recorded: 09/03/2012 Antonin Scalia, US Supreme Court judge, was born in New Jersey in 1936. He received his LL.B. from Harvard Law School, and was a Sheldon Fellow of Harvard University. Professor of Law at the University of Virginia and the University of Chicago, and Visiting Professor of Law at Georgetown University and Stanford University, Justice Scalia became Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel in the mid-Seventies. He was appointed Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1982. President Reagan nominated him as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court, and he took his seat in September 1986.
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Battle of Antietam; 17 September, 1862; Kurtz and Allison Art Publishing Company, Chicago; 1888

Battle of Antietam; 17 September, 1862; Kurtz and Allison Art Publishing Company, Chicago; 1888
Virginia Union University
Image by Penn State Special Collections Library
The full ferocity of the Battle of Antietam is captured in this beautiful memorial print produced by the Kurtz and Allison Art Publishing Company to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the bloodiest single-day battle in American history. The first major battle of the American Civil War to take place on Northern soil (near Sharpsburg, Maryland) produced a staggering 23,000 casualties. The epic battle pitted Union General George McClellan’s Army of the Potomac against Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Tactically the battle was inconclusive, with the Union halting Lee’s advance into Maryland but failing to pursue the Confederates southward to deliver a fatal blow. Only five days after this pyrrhic victory, September 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln announced that he would issue a formal emancipation of all slaves in any state of the Confederate States of America that did not return to Union control by January 1, 1863.

American Battlefield Prints Collection, Rare Books and Manuscripts Collection, Special Collections Library, University Libraries, Pennsylvania State University

Penn State’s Special Collections Library

Legacy of Civil War era celebrated by University Libraries’ exhibit

Albert Morrall

Albert Morrall
Virginia Union University
Image by jajacks62
Company H, 3rd South Carolina Cavalry, C. S. A.
From the biography of his daughter Mary Morrall Daring in A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans, written and compiled by William E. Connelley, Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, copyright 1918

Dr. Albert Morrall was born at Grahamville, South Carolina, November 17, 1829. The record of this old time physician has a distinctive place in the history of Kansas, particularly in the pioneer times of the country around the Big Blue River. He was of old Southern family and kept his sympathies with the South during the period of hostilities over slavery and the questions of state rights. He was educated in private schools at Grahamville, and first came to Kansas in the spring of 1856. He tells the story in his own words:

"I came to Kansas in the spring of 1856 in company with thirty other young men from the South. My object in coming to this state was to hunt buffaloes, but I was disappointed in not finding any very near to our camp at Atchison, where we first landed. We had to go into the country at least two hundred miles at that season of the year. Frank Palmer was one of the men with whom I came to Kansas and he was in charge of a company, the object of which in coming to Kansas was to make this a slave state. I was not a member of this company, but free to do as I pleased, although I always worked with them."

After describing several of the skirmishes between his side and the free state men, including the march of the pro-slavery men upon Lawrence and their encounter with Jim Lane and his men, Dr. Morrall continued: "In November, Vander Horst, Stringfellow of Virginia, and also William Grearson of Charleston, South Carolina, and I started for Marysville, fixing up one of the wagons for a hunt."

The following clipping taken from the St. Louis Republican, describes their experiences on this hunt: "Terrible suffering on the plains.–We have information of the return of a hunting party from the Little Blue in a most deplorable condition. They were Mr. James Stringfellow, Mr. Van Dorser and Mr. Morrall, the first from Atchison, K. T., and the two latter from South Carolina. George Matthews saw them after their hairbreadth escapes and gives me the following thrilling narrative: When they reached the Big Blue they fixed their encampment, but finding only a few buffalo they left their camp in charge of a negro man belonging to Mr. Van Dorser and proceeded over to the Little Blue. On the first evening out they were overtaken by a storm of wind and snow, and lost their way. They wandered for eight days without fire and food. They blew the tubes out of their guns in their efforts to kindle a fire and then threw the guns away. The feet of Van Dorser and Morrall became so frosted and they were so exhausted from fatigue and starvation that Mr. Stringfellow, who had had some mountain experience was scarcely able to get them to move along. He encouraged them by every means until they finally reached a habitation and were saved. Mr. Morrall and Mr. Van Dorser, however, will lose their feet and Mr. Stringfellow some of his toes. Their sufferings were beyond description and they will be ill for some weeks to come. The negro who remained in the camp is uninjured, although he suffered a good deal from the severity of the cold and anxiety for his master and friends. They are all now safely lodged at Atchison."

The above narrative gives some idea of their sufferings, but is not correct, as it was Mr. Morrall who finally led them to a habitation. To quote Doctor Morrall further: "When mortification set in, I got a sharp rifle bullet mold and with a file sharpened it, cutting my toes off myself by squeezing the mold down and pulling the bones out like a tooth one by one. I had to go on crutches all that winter."

In the spring of 1857 Mr. Morrall went to Mormon Grove, staked a claim of 160 acres, and built a small house eight feet square. In the summer he returned to Marysville, stopping with an old Frenchman named McCloskey who had an Indian wife from the Sioux tribe. From them he learned many signs and words of the Indian language. He often met the Indians and hunted all day with them. saving a little money, in the fall he built a small house, secured a partner and started a trading post. A man named Ballard took charge of the store, but failed in the business and all the money invested by him in the enterprise was lost.

At that time he determined to read medicine. He attended lectures at Rush Medical College in Chicago that winter and with the conclusion of the lectures returned to Kansas. The war between the North and the South then broke out and he was notified to leave the state or fight with the Union army. He could not bring himself to fight against his home people and he crossed over the Missouri River to St. Joseph and from there started for Lexington, Missouri, to join General Price, who was marching onto the town. Lexington was then held by General Anderson’s command of 4,000 men. He was part of General Price’s army which laid siege to the town and forced Anderson to surrender. Doctor Morrall states that 4,000 stands of arms and cannon, mules, wagons and ammunition were captured there. Mr. Morrall then started for South Carolina, revisiting his native town of Grahamville and goon joined the southern forces. He was stationed in and around Grahamville until the end of the war. He served as lieutenant in Company H, Third Regiment, South Carolina Cavalry. When hostilities were ended he was left practically penniless. Going to Charleston, he secured employment and bought quite a stock of wheelwright goods, opening a shop at Monk’s Corner, together with a man named Bonnett. He prospered in business and made enough while there to enable him to return to Kansas in 1866. He located at Wamego and soon afterwards re-entered Rush Medical College at Chicago, where he was graduated M. D. in 1867.

Doctor Morral was the first permanent physician of Wamego and he continued practice there for nearly half a century. He was a man of ability in his profession and enjoyed the highest standing and esteem of a large community. He served as county health officer and for four years was postmaster of Wamego, being a democrat in politics. He was a member of the Baptist Church and in 1862 joined Friendship Traveling Lodge of Masons at Grahamville, South Carolina. He was a charter member and served as Master of Wamego Lodge No. 75, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and was High Priest of Wamego Chapter No. 52, Royal Arch Masons. Doctor Morral prospered in a business way, was a stockholder in the Wamego Building and Loan Association, and he owned a residence on Lincoln Avenue which was his wife’s father’s house before him. This house is the oldest structure in Wamego and is still in excellent repair. Doctor Morrall also owned two farms west of Wamego, one of 600 acres and another of 30, and had property in Kansas City, Missouri.

Doctor Morrall’s death occurred in University Hospital at Kansas City, Missouri, March 4, 1917. He was then in his eighty-eighth year and was one of the last survivors of the active participants in the pioneer events of territorial Kansas.

Doctor Morrall married Sarah A. Wagner who was born at Dowagiac, Michigan, October 30, 1840 and died at Wamego May 7, 1880. Their only child is Mary Wagner Morrall, now Mrs. Darling.

Natchez Trace Parkway, Clinton Visitor Center, Clinton, Mississippi

Natchez Trace Parkway, Clinton Visitor Center, Clinton, Mississippi
Virginia Union University
Image by Ken Lund
Clinton is a city in Hinds County, Mississippi, United States. Situated in the Jackson metropolitan area, it is the tenth largest city in Mississippi. The population was 23,347 at the 2000 United States Census.

Clinton, founded in 1823 was originally known as Mount Salus, which means "Mountain of health". Mount Salus was also the name of the home of Walter Leake, third governor of Mississippi, which was located in Clinton and built in 1812. In 1828, the name was changed from Mount Salus to Clinton in honor of DeWitt Clinton, the former governor of New York.

The first road through Mount Salus/Clinton was the Natchez Trace. Currently Clinton has 3 major highways that cut through the city, U.S. Highway 80, U.S. Interstate 20 and the Natchez Trace Parkway.

Mississippi College, a Christian university located in Clinton, is the oldest college in the state of Mississippi, founded January 24, 1826. Mississippi College is the second oldest Baptist university in the world, and was also the first coeducational college in the United States to grant a degree to a woman. The historically black institution of higher education for women, Mount Hermon Female Seminary was established in 1875 by Sarah Ann Dickey. It closed in 1924.

Confederate forces, as well as Union troops—both under the command of Ulysses S. Grant and General Sherman—briefly occupied Clinton during the U.S. Civil War on the way to the Battle of Vicksburg in May 1863. Grant, who scored a decisive victory at Vicksburg, mistakenly believed that John C. Pemberton, a Confederate general, would attack him at Clinton.

In September 1875, the Clinton Riot occurred in downtown Clinton during a political rally of about 3000 people. The riot was racially and politically motivated, related to the contemporary Reconstruction movement under the Republican led U.S. government. Approximately 50 people were killed, mostly African-American, and all Republican. The lack of response from the U.S. government in retaliation signaled the beginning of the end of reconstruction.

During World War II, Camp Clinton was established, a German POW camp south of town which housed about 3,000 German soldiers. Most of the prisoners were from the Afrika Korps. Of the 40 German generals captured in WWII, Camp Clinton housed 35 of them. The German soldiers provided the labor to build a replica model of the Mississippi River Basin for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, used for flood prevention.

Clinton, the smallest city to ever host a Fortune 500 company, was the headquarters for WorldCom from the mid-1990s to until 2002. After its bankruptcy due to the largest accounting scandal at the time in U.S. history and fraud-related convictions of Bernard Ebbers, CEO and Scott Sullivan, CFO, it changed its name to MCI and moved its corporate headquarters location to Ashburn, Virginia. Verizon, MCI’s successor and which also owns SkyTel (no relation to Bell Mobility’s Skytel brand), still occupy the massive formerly WorldCom compound in Clinton.

Clinton is a Certified Mississippi Main Street Community.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinton,_Mississippi

Natchez Trace Parkway, Clinton Visitor Center, Clinton, Mississippi (1)

Natchez Trace Parkway, Clinton Visitor Center, Clinton, Mississippi (1)
Virginia Union University
Image by Ken Lund
Clinton is a city in Hinds County, Mississippi, United States. Situated in the Jackson metropolitan area, it is the tenth largest city in Mississippi. The population was 23,347 at the 2000 United States Census.

Clinton, founded in 1823 was originally known as Mount Salus, which means "Mountain of health". Mount Salus was also the name of the home of Walter Leake, third governor of Mississippi, which was located in Clinton and built in 1812. In 1828, the name was changed from Mount Salus to Clinton in honor of DeWitt Clinton, the former governor of New York.

The first road through Mount Salus/Clinton was the Natchez Trace. Currently Clinton has 3 major highways that cut through the city, U.S. Highway 80, U.S. Interstate 20 and the Natchez Trace Parkway.

Mississippi College, a Christian university located in Clinton, is the oldest college in the state of Mississippi, founded January 24, 1826. Mississippi College is the second oldest Baptist university in the world, and was also the first coeducational college in the United States to grant a degree to a woman. The historically black institution of higher education for women, Mount Hermon Female Seminary was established in 1875 by Sarah Ann Dickey. It closed in 1924.

Confederate forces, as well as Union troops—both under the command of Ulysses S. Grant and General Sherman—briefly occupied Clinton during the U.S. Civil War on the way to the Battle of Vicksburg in May 1863. Grant, who scored a decisive victory at Vicksburg, mistakenly believed that John C. Pemberton, a Confederate general, would attack him at Clinton.

In September 1875, the Clinton Riot occurred in downtown Clinton during a political rally of about 3000 people. The riot was racially and politically motivated, related to the contemporary Reconstruction movement under the Republican led U.S. government. Approximately 50 people were killed, mostly African-American, and all Republican. The lack of response from the U.S. government in retaliation signaled the beginning of the end of reconstruction.

During World War II, Camp Clinton was established, a German POW camp south of town which housed about 3,000 German soldiers. Most of the prisoners were from the Afrika Korps. Of the 40 German generals captured in WWII, Camp Clinton housed 35 of them. The German soldiers provided the labor to build a replica model of the Mississippi River Basin for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, used for flood prevention.

Clinton, the smallest city to ever host a Fortune 500 company, was the headquarters for WorldCom from the mid-1990s to until 2002. After its bankruptcy due to the largest accounting scandal at the time in U.S. history and fraud-related convictions of Bernard Ebbers, CEO and Scott Sullivan, CFO, it changed its name to MCI and moved its corporate headquarters location to Ashburn, Virginia. Verizon, MCI’s successor and which also owns SkyTel (no relation to Bell Mobility’s Skytel brand), still occupy the massive formerly WorldCom compound in Clinton.

Clinton is a Certified Mississippi Main Street Community.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinton,_Mississippi