Harvey Thaxton, 64, Lives with His Mother in Rhodell, West Virginia (See Picture #14030), near Beckley 04/1974

Harvey Thaxton, 64, Lives with His Mother in Rhodell, West Virginia (See Picture #14030), near Beckley 04/1974
Colleges In Virginia
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Harvey Thaxton, 64, Lives with His Mother in Rhodell, West Virginia (See Picture #14030), near Beckley. A Retired Miner, He Used Black Lung Money to Buy Whiskey and Paint the Wall in the Picture Red. He Receives a Monthly Benefit in Addition to a One Time Black Lung Payment. The Picture on the Wall Shows Him in World War Ii Uniform with His Wife, Now Dead 04/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-14031

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
West Virginia (United States) state
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556483

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

David Shanklin, 19, Lives in a Coal Company Town near Sunbright, West Virginia, and Graduated From Logan County High School. His Girlfriend, Janet Edwards, 17, Still Attends High School in Logan…

David Shanklin, 19, Lives in a Coal Company Town near Sunbright, West Virginia, and Graduated From Logan County High School. His Girlfriend, Janet Edwards, 17, Still Attends High School in Logan…
Colleges In Virginia
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: David Shanklin, 19, Lives in a Coal Company Town near Sunbright, West Virginia, and Graduated From Logan County High School. His Girlfriend, Janet Edwards, 17, Still Attends High School in Logan. David’s Father Was Killed in the Mines in 1954 by a Roof Fall and He Wants to Be a Miner, But His Mother Doesn’t Want Him To. The Youth Has a Brother Working in the Mines. Notice the Out Houses in Front of the Homes 04/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-13966

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
West Virginia (United States) state
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556418

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Keeping House: Women’s Lives in Western Pennsylvania 1790-1850

Keeping House: Women’s Lives in Western Pennsylvania 1790-1850

This book is a fascinating re-creation of the lives of women in the time of great social change that followed the end of the French and Indian War in  western Pennsylvania.  Many decades passed before a desolate and violent frontier was transformed into a stable region of farms and towns.  Keeping House: Women’s Lives in Western Pennsylvania, 1790-1850  tells how the daughters, wives, and mothers who crossed the Allegheny Mountains responded and adapted to unaccustomed physical and psychological hardships as they established lives for themselves and their families in their new homes.

Intrigued by late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century manuscript cookbooks in the collection of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania, Virginia Bartlett wanted to find out more about women living in the region during that period.  Quoting from journals, letters, cookbooks, travelers’ accounts – approving and critical – memoirs, documents, and newspapers, she offers us voices of women and men commenting seriously and humorously on what was going on around them.

The text is well-illustrated with contemporaneous art– engravings, apaintings, drawings, and cartoons.  Of special interest are color and black-and-white photographs of furnishings, housewares, clothing, and portraits from the collections of the Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania.

This is not a sentimental account.  Bartlett makes clear how little say women had about their lives and how little protection they could expect from the law, especially on matters relating to property.  Their world was one of marked contrasts: life in a log cabin with bare necessities and elegant dinners in the homes of Pittsburgh’s military and entrepreneurial elite; rural women in homespun and affluent Pittsburgh ladies in imported fashions.  When the book begins, families are living in fear of Indian attacks; as it ends, the word “shawling” has come into use as the polite term for pregnancy, referring to women’s attempt to hide their condition with cleverly draped shawls.  The menacing frontier has given way to American-style gentility.

An introduction by Jack D. Warren, University of Virginia, sets the scene with a discussion of the early peopling of the region and places the book within the context of women’s studies.

List Price: $ 21.95

Price: $ 11.00

Obama’s Health Care starts to save lives, but Republicans pledge to dismantle it.

President Barack Obama was back defending his historic health care reforms Wednesday, as key elements of the important law came into effect despite Republican pledges to dismantle the new system. The legislation was helping end the “horrendous” vulnerability of millions of uninsured Americans who had been denied coverage, unfairly dropped from company plans, or were simply unable to afford insurance, Obama said. Health care reform was “the most important patients bill of rights that we’ve ever seen in our history,” Obama told a backyard meeting of residents in the town of Falls Church, Virginia. Insurance companies can no longer drop clients once they become ill, impose a lifetime limit on how much they will pay out to a client, or refuse coverage to children with pre-existing conditions. But Republicans have vowed to repeal the reforms. Obama vowed to fight back, and pointed out that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has said the measure will save taxpayers mountains of cash at a time of steep deficits. “Why would you want to repeal something that the CBO says will save us a trillion dollars, if you’re serious about the deficit?” Obama told his handpicked audience at a local home. “It doesn’t make sense. It makes sense in terms of politics and polls, it doesn’t make sense in terms of actually making people’s life better.” The White House, in a statement hours earlier, said the Patient’s Bill of Rights put “an end to some of the worst insurance company abuses, and
Video Rating: 3 / 5

Wendell Potter in VA Beach: Health care law “already saving the lives of millions”

Virginia Organizing, Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy and Empower Hampton Roads were prompted to hold the “Real Dialogue on Health Care” forum because they feel that many people are unaware of what is in the health care law. The forum’s keynote speaker, Wendell Potter, is a former insurance executive who testified numerous times before Congress on the need for health insurance reform. Potter, a well-respected journalist and author of the book “Deadly Spin,” has become a leading critic of the health insurance industry, exposing strategies health insurance companies use to drop coverage and deny care in order to boost their profits.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

Jack Smith, 42, a Disabled Miner Who Lives in Rhodell, West Virginia, near Beckley 06/1974

Jack Smith, 42, a Disabled Miner Who Lives in Rhodell, West Virginia, near Beckley 06/1974
Virginia Workers Compensation
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Jack Smith, 42, a Disabled Miner Who Lives in Rhodell, West Virginia, near Beckley. He Had Worked in the Mines One Year When a Rock Cavein Crushed His Legs, and It Took Him 18 Years before He Received Workman’s Compensation. His Wheelchair Was Bought by His Friend, Arnold Miller, President of the United Mine Workers. Smith Now Operates a Beer Joint and Stays Up on Union Activities. He Has Manned Picket Lines in the Past in His Wheelchair. The Dog Is a Family Pet 06/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-14097

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
Beckley (Raleigh county, West Virginia, United States) inhabited place
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: http://arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556549

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Buy copies of selected National Archives photographs and documents at the National Archives Print Shop online: gallery.pictopia.com/natf/photo/

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted

Jack Smith, 42, a Disabled Miner Who Lives in Rhodell, West Virginia, Shown with One of His Daughters, Debra, in the Tavern He Now Operates 06/1974

Jack Smith, 42, a Disabled Miner Who Lives in Rhodell, West Virginia, Shown with One of His Daughters, Debra, in the Tavern He Now Operates 06/1974
Virginia Workers Compensation
Image by The U.S. National Archives
Original Caption: Jack Smith, 42, a Disabled Miner Who Lives in Rhodell, West Virginia, Shown with One of His Daughters, Debra, in the Tavern He Now Operates. He Had Worked in the Mines One Year When His Legs Were Crushed in a Roof Cavein. It Took Him 18 Years to Received Workman’s Compensation. His Wheelchair Was Bought for Him by His Friend, Arnold Miller, Now President of the United Mine Workers Smith Is Active in the Union, and Has Manned Picket Lines in the Past 06/1974

U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-14098

Photographer: Corn, Jack, 1929-

Subjects:
West Virginia (United States) state
Environmental Protection Agency
Project DOCUMERICA

Persistent URL: http://arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=556550

Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001.

For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html

Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html

Buy copies of selected National Archives photographs and documents at the National Archives Print Shop online: gallery.pictopia.com/natf/photo/

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted
Use Restrictions: Unrestricted