Film Fun Magazine (October 1933) … The Ootchy – Kootchy Rule — Reality can’t possibly compete (June 15, 2012 / 25 Sivan 5772) …

Film Fun Magazine (October 1933) … The Ootchy – Kootchy Rule — Reality can’t possibly compete (June 15, 2012 / 25 Sivan 5772) …
Virginia Union University
Image by marsmet545
Thirdly, the problem with romance and ootchy-kootchy is that it’s all about some fictional fantasy. Original romance was all about unrequited love. It could stay in the clouds but it never actually existed.

It was never required to withstand the test of dirty diapers, unpaid bills and leaky faucets. Dinner doesn’t have to be made, homework doesn’t require doing and the garbage doesn’t have to be taken out. Reality can’t possibly compete.

True romance is in the giving, not the taking.

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…..item 1)…. aish.com … www.aish.com/f … HOME FAMILY MOM WITH A VIEW ….

The Ootchy-Kootchy Rule

Why couples who show the most public affection are more likely to divorce.

June 15, 2012 / 25 Sivan 5772
by Emuna Braverman
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img code photo … The Ootchy-Kootchy Rule … HOME FAMILY MOM WITH A VIEW blog …

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www.aish.com/f/mom/The_Ootchy-Kootchy_Rule.html

People who define marriage mostly as romance are more likely to put their own needs over the needs of the partnership and 1-1/2 times more like to divorce. These are the 2010 findings of the University of Virginia National Marriage Project. And they accord perfectly with my husband’s “Ootchy-Kootchy” rule. In his experience, the couples that are the mostly physically demonstrative in public (and that have the most nauseating pet names for each other!) – you know the ones I mean – have the lowest rate of marital success.

What gives?

I think there are a few reasons that explain the high divorce rate.

One is that frequently all that public display is exactly that – a performance for the audience. It’s not about how you feel about each other; it’s more about how the world feels about you. “Look at that gorgeous couple.” “They seem so in love.” It’s all about the image, the show. It’s about a romantic scene (too many movies?) and not about reality. It may even be about being in love with the idea of love. But it’s certainly not evidence of a deep and committed relationship.

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Secondly, most people who truly care about each other, while occasionally affectionate in public, recognize that the true expression of love is an intimate and private concern. They don’t want to cheapen it by public proclamation and performance. They don’t want their privacy violated; their unique and special relationship gawked at by complete strangers, widely observed, or even marveled at. It will take away some of its special character. It’s too precious to risk.

Thirdly, the problem with romance and ootchy-kootchy is that it’s all about some fictional fantasy. Original romance was all about unrequited love. It could stay in the clouds but it never actually existed. It was never required to withstand the test of dirty diapers, unpaid bills and leaky faucets. Dinner doesn’t have to be made, homework doesn’t require doing and the garbage doesn’t have to be taken out. Reality can’t possibly compete.

—–True romance is in the giving, not the taking.

And yet it’s reality and not romance that ultimately has more staying power. And in that reality, it’s the people who don’t put their own needs first who have the most successful marriages. It’s not about giving up on romance but it’s about recognizing that true romance is in the giving, not the taking. It’s putting your spouse’s needs first. It’s about attending to the internal demands of the marriage and ignoring the rest of the world. All that counts is the two of you.

No one else needs to see the affection to prove the relationship is real. No one else needs to experience the giving. In fact, a truly holy union doesn’t allow anyone else in, particularly strangers at the mall or bus stop!

Keeping a relationship private also helps preserve it. The more public exposure, the more the intensity of a situation dissipates. We need to guard our relationships from external perspectives and interference.
It’s time to put the affection back in the home where it belongs. It’s time to put the romance back on the fiction shelf. And it’s time to dig deep and put in the effort to make a substantial relationship, based on shared goals and values, and good character. And it’s time to be much more concerned about our private behavior than about public response.
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N&W 1218 Departs Roanoke – October 12, 1991

The 1218 departs Roanoke, Virginia in spectacular fashion for Walton on October 12, 1991, in what would turn out to be one of the steam locomotive’s final excursion runs. The class A 1218, built in 1943 in the Norfolk & Western’s Roanoke Shops, was due for its five-year inspection the following Spring, and was never returned to service. Three years later, Norfolk Southern abandoned their steam excursion program, retiring the class J 611 and leaving the fate of the disassembled 1218 uncertain. In January of 1996, the 1218, now with only a shell of a boiler, was towed from the former Birmingham steam shops back to Roanoke, and in 2003, after cosmetic restoration, it was moved to the Virginia Museum of Transportation for permanent display.

Exploring Bowden Cave (near Elkins WV – October 14 1998)

Another passion of mine besides trains-cave exploration! Here, we check out Bowden Cave, a few miles east of Elkins, West Virginia. This really isn’t a thorough exploration, as most of my cave explorations usually are, but just a trip to the stream passage located on a lower level of the cave (challenging enough!). We on occasion make short explorations such as this to see what we’re up against should we decide to return and explore more thoroughly after all. My first 8mm camcorder had no built-in light, making it necessary to use our bike headlights as cave lights! I tried to maintain as much detail as possible under these circumstances. So come on in with us!! We’re over 40, and we did it!! Actually, we stopped here while taking the “scenic route” home from Cass! Note: This cave was closed in the early 2000s (reason unknown) but I believe it’s been reopened since. Use caution, and know what you’re getting into! And, please, take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints, and kill nothing but time! From an 8mm video. Mastered here in 720p for best upload results with my software.

Presidents of the College of William & Mary Exhibit, October 2011

Presidents of the College of William & Mary Exhibit, October 2011
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the Presidents of the College of William & Mary exhibit series located on the third floor of Swem Library just outside the Brown Board Room. The exhibit provides a history of the College as seen through the eyes of its presidents. This exhibit case features the presidencies of James Blair, William Dawson, William Stith, and Thomas Dawson and will be on display from October 13, 2011 through April 20, 2012.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

This exhibit is part of a continuing series about the presidents of the College of William & Mary. The items selected here are from the Special Collections Research Center. The Center’s University Archives contains records from a number of William & Mary presidents.

For more information about the Office of the President records in the Special Collections Research Center, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/index.php?p=collections/classifications&…

James Blair, 1693-1743

As the first president of the College of William & Mary, James Blair oversaw the reconstruction of the Wren Building after a fire in 1705; the transfer of the Charter from the founders to the president and masters of the College; the construction of the President’s House and the Brafferton; and the hiring of capable members of the faculty. Blair was head of the Church of England in Virginia; rector of Henrico, Jamestown, and Bruton Parish churches; as well as a member and president of the Virginia Governor’s Council. These positions made Blair one of the most powerful men in the colony, resulting in periodic clashes over power between him and three royal governors: Sir Edmund Andros, Sir Francis Nicholson, and Alexander Spotswood.

For more information about James Blair, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/James_Blair

James Hargrove. James Blair, 1705 Reproduction of Oil Painting , University Archives Photograph Collection (UA 8).

James Blair Our Saviour’s Divine Sermon on the Mount London, 1740, Rare Books: BT 380.B55 1740 V. 1

William Dawson, 1743-1752

Educated at Queen’s College, Oxford, William Dawson came to the College of William & Mary in 1729 as master of moral and intellectual philosophy. After the death of James Blair in 1743, Dawson became the second president of William & Mary and inherited all of Blair’s appointments apart from rector of Bruton Parish. During his tenure as president, Dawson maintained a harmonious relationship with the royal government and the faculty of the College.

For more information about William Dawson, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/William_Dawson

Surveyor’s License of John West, Jr., 1749. William Dawson signed this surveyor’s license on behalf of the College of William & Mary. University Archives Subject File Collection, UA 9

A letter from the Rev. Mr. Dawson, Commisary to the Lord Bishop of London, and President of William and Mary College, to the clergy of Virginia in America London, 1745. Rare Books: E97.D3

William Stith, 1752-1755

William Stith, third president of the College of William & Mary, attended the Grammar School around 1720 and then returned to Williamsburg as master of the grammar school from 1731-1732. When William Dawson died in 1752, there was a bitter fight between provincial leaders and Governor Robert Dinwiddie as to who would be the next president. In the end, the provincial leaders’ candidate, William Stith, was elected president. As a result, William & Mary’s faculty and the Board of Visitors became embroiled in a power struggle over the governance of the College that would last until the American Revolution.

For more information about William Stith, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/William_Stith

William Stith Deed, 1738. In this deed, William Stith gave two lots in the city of Williamsburg to the College of William & Mary. University Archives Subject File Collection, UA 9

Marcus Minucius Felix M. Minucii Felicis Octavius cum integris observationibus Nic. Rigaltii, et selectis aliorum. Recensuit, suasque notas adjecit Joannes Davisius. Praemittitur Franc. Balduini Dissertatio, rerumque & Latinitatis Indices subnectuntur London, 1707. Stith’s signature and bookplate appear on the inside cover of this volume. Rare Books: BT1116 .M6 1707

Thomas Dawson, 1755-1760

The presidency of Thomas Dawson, a 1737 graduate and brother of William Dawson, was filled with controversy as the conflict between the faculty and the Board of Visitors continued to grow. During the fourth president’s tenure, the faculty and the local government disputed over the right to try clergy as well as over the Two Penny Act in 1758, which lowered salaries for clergy by two-thirds. In addition, the Board of Visitors and the faculty clashed over who had the authority to expel students and dismiss members of the faculty. In the end, Thomas Dawson’s presidency was ineffective in repairing those rifts.

For more information about Thomas Dawson, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/Thomas_Dawson

Thomas Dawson, Williamsburg, Virginia to Lady Gooch, widow of Sir William Gooch, Governor of Virginia (1727-1749) January 1758 William and Thomas Dawson Papers, Mss. 65 Pst D32

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

Presidents of the College of William & Mary Exhibit, October 2011

Presidents of the College of William & Mary Exhibit, October 2011
Colleges In Virginia
Image by Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library
Shown here is an image from the Presidents of the College of William & Mary exhibit series located on the third floor of Swem Library just outside the Brown Board Room. The exhibit provides a history of the College as seen through the eyes of its presidents. This exhibit case features the presidencies of James Blair, William Dawson, William Stith, and Thomas Dawson and will be on display from October 13, 2011 through April 20, 2012.

The following is taken from the label text presented in this case:

This exhibit is part of a continuing series about the presidents of the College of William & Mary. The items selected here are from the Special Collections Research Center. The Center’s University Archives contains records from a number of William & Mary presidents.

For more information about the Office of the President records in the Special Collections Research Center, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/index.php?p=collections/classifications&…

James Blair, 1693-1743

As the first president of the College of William & Mary, James Blair oversaw the reconstruction of the Wren Building after a fire in 1705; the transfer of the Charter from the founders to the president and masters of the College; the construction of the President’s House and the Brafferton; and the hiring of capable members of the faculty. Blair was head of the Church of England in Virginia; rector of Henrico, Jamestown, and Bruton Parish churches; as well as a member and president of the Virginia Governor’s Council. These positions made Blair one of the most powerful men in the colony, resulting in periodic clashes over power between him and three royal governors: Sir Edmund Andros, Sir Francis Nicholson, and Alexander Spotswood.

For more information about James Blair, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/James_Blair

James Hargrove. James Blair, 1705 Reproduction of Oil Painting , University Archives Photograph Collection (UA 8).

James Blair Our Saviour’s Divine Sermon on the Mount London, 1740, Rare Books: BT 380.B55 1740 V. 1

William Dawson, 1743-1752

Educated at Queen’s College, Oxford, William Dawson came to the College of William & Mary in 1729 as master of moral and intellectual philosophy. After the death of James Blair in 1743, Dawson became the second president of William & Mary and inherited all of Blair’s appointments apart from rector of Bruton Parish. During his tenure as president, Dawson maintained a harmonious relationship with the royal government and the faculty of the College.

For more information about William Dawson, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/William_Dawson

Surveyor’s License of John West, Jr., 1749. William Dawson signed this surveyor’s license on behalf of the College of William & Mary. University Archives Subject File Collection, UA 9

A letter from the Rev. Mr. Dawson, Commisary to the Lord Bishop of London, and President of William and Mary College, to the clergy of Virginia in America London, 1745. Rare Books: E97.D3

William Stith, 1752-1755

William Stith, third president of the College of William & Mary, attended the Grammar School around 1720 and then returned to Williamsburg as master of the grammar school from 1731-1732. When William Dawson died in 1752, there was a bitter fight between provincial leaders and Governor Robert Dinwiddie as to who would be the next president. In the end, the provincial leaders’ candidate, William Stith, was elected president. As a result, William & Mary’s faculty and the Board of Visitors became embroiled in a power struggle over the governance of the College that would last until the American Revolution.

For more information about William Stith, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/William_Stith

William Stith Deed, 1738. In this deed, William Stith gave two lots in the city of Williamsburg to the College of William & Mary. University Archives Subject File Collection, UA 9

Marcus Minucius Felix M. Minucii Felicis Octavius cum integris observationibus Nic. Rigaltii, et selectis aliorum. Recensuit, suasque notas adjecit Joannes Davisius. Praemittitur Franc. Balduini Dissertatio, rerumque & Latinitatis Indices subnectuntur London, 1707. Stith’s signature and bookplate appear on the inside cover of this volume. Rare Books: BT1116 .M6 1707

Thomas Dawson, 1755-1760

The presidency of Thomas Dawson, a 1737 graduate and brother of William Dawson, was filled with controversy as the conflict between the faculty and the Board of Visitors continued to grow. During the fourth president’s tenure, the faculty and the local government disputed over the right to try clergy as well as over the Two Penny Act in 1758, which lowered salaries for clergy by two-thirds. In addition, the Board of Visitors and the faculty clashed over who had the authority to expel students and dismiss members of the faculty. In the end, Thomas Dawson’s presidency was ineffective in repairing those rifts.

For more information about Thomas Dawson, please visit scrc.swem.wm.edu/wiki/index.php/Thomas_Dawson

Thomas Dawson, Williamsburg, Virginia to Lady Gooch, widow of Sir William Gooch, Governor of Virginia (1727-1749) January 1758 William and Thomas Dawson Papers, Mss. 65 Pst D32

From the Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library at the College of William and Mary. See swem.wm.edu/scrc/ for further information and assistance.

West Virginia sunset, October 2009

West Virginia sunset, October 2009
Virginia Western
Image by Alaskan Dude
While visiting family in western PA in October 2009 we popped into northern West Virginia to check out some state parks, including Cooper Rock, Valley Falls, and Blackwater Falls. WV is really an underrated state – it is very scenic – great waterfalls, vistas, rolling hills and big rivers – if you have a chance, check it out!

12 October 2009 NYSE Closing Bell High Point University

Students, faculty and administrators from High Point University visit the NYSE. In honor of the occasion, Dr. Nido R. Qubein, BB&T board member and President of High Point University rings The Closing Bell®. BB&T Corporation, headquartered in Winston-Salem, NC , is among the nation’s top financial holding companies with 2.4 billion in assets. Its bank subsidiaries operate approximately 1500 financial centers in the Carolinas, Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Georgia, Maryland, Tennessee, Florida, Alabama, Indiana and Washington, DC BB&T ranks No. 2 in market share in North Carolina; No. 4 in Virginia/Washington, DC; No. 3 in South Carolina; No. 1 in West Virginia; No. 5 in Georgia; No. 6 in Maryland; No. 4 in Kentucky; and No. 6 in Tennessee. BB&T’s operating strategy distinguishes it from other financial holding companies. BB&T’s banking subsidiaries are organized as a group of community banks, each with a regional president, which allows decisions to be made locally, close to the client. This also makes BB&T’s client service more responsive, reliable and empathetic. Since 1989, BB&T has completed the acquisition of 60 community banks and thrifts, more than 85 insurance agencies, and 35 non-bank financial services companies. This acquisition strategy has contributed significantly to BB&T’s success. About High Point University At High Point University, every student receives an extraordinary education in a fun environment with caring people. HPU, located in the
Video Rating: 5 / 5

9th International Software Process Workshop: Proceedings, Airlie, Virginia, October 5-7, 1994 (International Software Process Workshop//(Proceedings))

9th International Software Process Workshop: Proceedings, Airlie, Virginia, October 5-7, 1994 (International Software Process Workshop//(Proceedings))

List Price: $ 80.00

Price: $ 80.00